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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Have some pronounced tire cupping occuring with only 1400 miles on the stock Dunnie. The tire is set 36 psi. I'm going to jack it to 40 psi and try to get more center wear. Had the exact same problem with the 1800 VTX. Made improvements by raising the air pressure. Hopefully it will improve overall tire wear. Have a new Dunnie Elite 3 sitting in the garage. It has no centerline groove like the stock tire and according Dunnie it's suppose to have longer/better wear features.....
Had a ME 880 Metz on my X when it was traded and that tire appeared to wear better that the Dunnie.
Has anyone else "jacked" front tire pressure???
 

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bob109 said:
Have some pronounced tire cupping occuring with only 1400 miles on the stock Dunnie. The tire is set 36 psi. I'm going to jack it to 40 psi and try to get more center wear. Had the exact same problem with the 1800 VTX. Made improvements by raising the air pressure. Hopefully it will improve overall tire wear. Have a new Dunnie Elite 3 sitting in the garage. It has no centerline groove like the stock tire and according Dunnie it's suppose to have longer/better wear features.....
Had a ME 880 Metz on my X when it was traded and that tire appeared to wear better that the Dunnie.
Has anyone else "jacked" front tire pressure???
No appreciable tire wear here. Do you have pictures of yours?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Wanted said:
No appreciable tire wear here. Do you have pictures of yours?
No pictures...cupping is on the left side of the tire....I think jacking the pressure to 42 psi will reduce the wear substantially.....I should have realized that the fork rake/angle on the 109 is very close to the 1800 X/C and both bikes use the identical tire size.....guess this proves the cupping is across the spectrum of several brand/style of bikes.
 

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wouldnt low pressure affect both sides of the tire equally? Is it possible it is being caused by something else?
Seems strange to me, but I am no expert
 
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sledzep01 said:
wouldnt low pressure affect both sides of the tire equally? Is it possible it is being caused by something else?
Seems strange to me, but I am no expert
We ran a 350 mile trip last summer with Donna's, my wife's, tires about 5 PSI too low. Both tires cupped but only on one side. I agree that it goes against everything I've ever been taught but it was only on one side.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
sledzep01 said:
wouldnt low pressure affect both sides of the tire equally? Is it possible it is being caused by something else?
Seems strange to me, but I am no expert
For reasons I'm unaware of, the wear is always more pronounced on the left side of the tire, just off the center line. I had a 1800 VTX/C.....same problem. A friend has a Gold Wing, same condition. I'm beginning to think it's a problem with Bikes weighing over 650 lbs.?????
 

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I always thought it was because of road crowning. Most roads are crowned such that the contact patch is skewed left of center.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
ITguy said:
Read about this in the past and best my memory serves I am pretty certain this is the cause for left being more prominent. In US (ride on right side of road vs left side in say Europe) left turns are going to cause more wear than right turns as you are likely traveling at a higher speed in the left turn (wider angle versus near 90 for right). The opposite would be true of riders in say Europe their right side would show more wear.
Anyone on this board have friends or relatives who live in Europe and ride motorcycles???? I know there's a Aussie rider member here, but I think those folks also drive on the right side as we do! Some info from folks who actually live on the other side of the"pond" would confirm this theory!
 

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Of course we could just ride in the opposite lane half the time to balance things out. It would amuse the oncoming trafic too.
Concenus used to be that most of left cupping is caused by road crowning and a little more pressure might help. In the meantime, you might at most sqeeze another thousand or so out of the tire so I'm not too concerned.
Jerbear
 
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The complete article here: http://www.rattlebars.com/valkfaq/tirewear/

The important part:

But the question remains - Why is this wear more evident on the left front in most cases? Actually, excessive side tire wear is only evident on the left front in countries where one rides on the right side of the road. Riding right means that the left side of your tire will have more (and likely faster) miles on it than the right side. Left hand turns have a larger radius than right hand turns in right side driving countries, hence you ride farther (and likely faster) turning left than turning right with subsequent increased side band wear on the tire's left side. The left side of your tire has more miles on it (in some extreme cases, twice as many) than the right side of your tire. And the side of your tire only gets mileage when you are leaned in a turn, otherwise, this area of your tire does not contact the pavement at all as shown in the photo. European left side drivers find that the right side of their front tires will wear out first. Quite the opposite effect for precisely the same reasons reversed. (If you're still not convinced, we will re-visit this issue later with more reasons)
 

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Wanted said:
I always thought it was because of road crowning. Most roads are crowned such that the contact patch is skewed left of center.
I am under the same impression.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
HalGreenlee said:
The complete article here:Â http://www.rattlebars.com/valkfaq/tirewear/

The important part:

But the question remains - Why is this wear more evident on the left front in most cases? Actually, excessive side tire wear is only evident on the left front in countries where one rides on the right side of the road. Riding right means that the left side of your tire will have more (and likely faster) miles on it than the right side. Left hand turns have a larger radius than right hand turns in right side driving countries, hence you ride farther (and likely faster) turning left than turning right with subsequent increased side band wear on the tire's left side. The left side of your tire has more miles on it (in some extreme cases, twice as many) than the right side of your tire. And the side of your tire only gets mileage when you are leaned in a turn, otherwise, this area of your tire does not contact the pavement at all as shown in the photo. European left side drivers find that the right side of their front tires will wear out first. Quite the opposite effect for precisely the same reasons reversed. (If you're still not convinced, we will re-visit this issue later with more reasons)
Sounds logical to me!
 

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My dad spoke with a dunlop rep at a rally and told him to put the psi that is on the tire and not go with what is required for the bike. By doing this he got 21000 miles out of 1 set on his winger
 

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bigzuki109er said:
My dad spoke with a dunlop rep at a rally and told him to put the psi that is on the tire and not go with what is required for the bike. By doing this he got 21000 miles out of 1 set on his winger
That has been a debate with tires for a long time. The tire manufacture states max PSI due to the weight load rating. But the manufacture states pressure due to there design of the vehicle. I would ask a Suzuki engineer why they chose to have the tires set at that pressure. just my 2 cents.
 
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