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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I did a search, and while I was able to find several discussions on the subject, I wasn't able to locate a "how to" thread. Have any of you accomplished this procedure and if so, could you post a "how to" or a link? I need to cure my bike's high idle problem. Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Have you looked at a service manual grampi?
Yes, and it says to connect an ISC valve coupler and a mode select switch. I know I don't have these special tools. Are they something you can just make yourself, or do they need to be purchased from Suzuki? I figured there might be someone on this site that's done this procedure without these tools, or they just made something themselves to do it with.
 

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The Mode Select Switch can be made as described here which is definately "home-made". The diagnostic mode displays any codes the computer has generated plus it puts the SET valve to mid-range. I read somewhere it also sets something in intake side of the engine (maybe the ISC valve).

I don't know about the ISC valve coupler.
 

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I did a search, and while I was able to find several discussions on the subject, I wasn't able to locate a "how to" thread. Have any of you accomplished this procedure and if so, could you post a "how to" or a link? I need to cure my bike's high idle problem. Thanks.
Every time I start my bike up, it idles around 2800 rpm's. It takes right off when I let the clutch out and I love it. If you have high idle, are you idling around 5000 rmps?
 

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I'm going to reply only with the obvious, which you probably have already done. Check for any vacuum leaks, a vacuum leak is unmetered air that will cause the bike to idle fast. Another thing to try is disconnect the battery for 10 minutes to clear all fuel trim. Did you check the ISC to see if it is sticking? Just some things to check before taking it to the dealer for their proprietory tool hookup. (another pet peeve, seems every manufacturer thinks mechanics can't really fix anything unless they have 'factory' training).
 

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I did a search, and while I was able to find several discussions on the subject, I wasn't able to locate a "how to" thread. Have any of you accomplished this procedure and if so, could you post a "how to" or a link? I need to cure my bike's high idle problem. Thanks.
I was just looking into doing this myself. A friend of mine who has done this on a few of his bikes in the past said you just need a throttle body sync meter. They have digital ones and vacuum (older) ones.
I hanv't looked into it yet, but he said it was quite easy. After reading this thread, I'm now wondering.
In any event, I will follow this thread, and let you know what I find out once I've delved into it.
:tools:
 

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Found a few threads for other bikes. This is one guy that adjusts his every oil change on his GXSR.

You need a carb sync tool in order to do this, motion pro makes a good one: http://www.motionpro.com/motorcycle/tools/syncpro/

Its kinda easy to explain if you have worked on your bike before.
1) Prop up the tank and remove the air box. Here is the Spark Plug DIY, it tells you how to do remove it:
http://www.gixxer.com/forums/showthread.php?t=114103
2) Unplug the vacuum sensor (SEE PIC). On the bottom of this sensor you will see a piece of tubing, from this tube it will branch off to the throttle bodies, these are your vacuum hoses. Remove the VACUUM hose from each throttle body. FYI There are 2 hoses on each throttle body, the vacuum tube is the LOWER hose.
3) Replace the VACUUM tubes you just unplugged with the tubes from the sync tool, 1 per throttle body.
4) Start the bike, you will have an FI error, its ok, let the bike warm up. Once its warm adjust the idle to around 1500-2000 RPM, using the idle adjustment screw. Furing this entire process try not to REV the bike too hard because you will suck fluid into the throttle body (bad joojoo).
5) Adjust the throttle body using the small GOLD adjustment screw located on the top of the throttle body (SEE PIC). What you want is the vacuum pressures to be even across the tool. So adjust each one to make this happen. If only one cylinder is out of sync, then just adjust that one first. Keep in mind though, if you adjust one the others might move too, so its a balancing act. Dont get frustrated, just keep making small adjustments and eventually they will all even out.
6) Once your done, replace the vacuum tubes and plug in the vacuum sensor, replace the air box and its tubes, put everything back together that you took off. Start the bike again and enjoy.

More threads

I use a Carb-Tune II. NO fluid. Anyone who has used it will swear by it. Real easy to do. Use it twice and you've already saved yourself some money

I still hanv't looked into this for the 9 yet, but I will.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Found a few threads for other bikes. This is one guy that adjusts his every oil change on his GXSR.

You need a carb sync tool in order to do this, motion pro makes a good one: http://www.motionpro.com/motorcycle/tools/syncpro/

Its kinda easy to explain if you have worked on your bike before.
1) Prop up the tank and remove the air box. Here is the Spark Plug DIY, it tells you how to do remove it:
http://www.gixxer.com/forums/showthread.php?t=114103
2) Unplug the vacuum sensor (SEE PIC). On the bottom of this sensor you will see a piece of tubing, from this tube it will branch off to the throttle bodies, these are your vacuum hoses. Remove the VACUUM hose from each throttle body. FYI There are 2 hoses on each throttle body, the vacuum tube is the LOWER hose.
3) Replace the VACUUM tubes you just unplugged with the tubes from the sync tool, 1 per throttle body.
4) Start the bike, you will have an FI error, its ok, let the bike warm up. Once its warm adjust the idle to around 1500-2000 RPM, using the idle adjustment screw. Furing this entire process try not to REV the bike too hard because you will suck fluid into the throttle body (bad joojoo).
5) Adjust the throttle body using the small GOLD adjustment screw located on the top of the throttle body (SEE PIC). What you want is the vacuum pressures to be even across the tool. So adjust each one to make this happen. If only one cylinder is out of sync, then just adjust that one first. Keep in mind though, if you adjust one the others might move too, so its a balancing act. Dont get frustrated, just keep making small adjustments and eventually they will all even out.
6) Once your done, replace the vacuum tubes and plug in the vacuum sensor, replace the air box and its tubes, put everything back together that you took off. Start the bike again and enjoy.

More threads

I use a Carb-Tune II. NO fluid. Anyone who has used it will swear by it. Real easy to do. Use it twice and you've already saved yourself some money

I still hanv't looked into this for the 9 yet, but I will.
Couple of questions. With the object being to get both throttle bodies at the same vacuum level, is there a desired vacuum level you should be shooting for on the first one before you balance them out, or doesn't the amount of vaccum matter as long as they're both the same? And where did you get your Carb-Tune II?
 

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The quote in red was not from me, so unfortunately I can't answer your questions. It was a thread I found on another forum regarding a GSXR.
I was told however it doesn't matter what the vacuum is as long as they are the same.
 
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