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yeah i seen it before too,.... good write up...

i live just a few miles from where the test rides were done....

I/we ride these roads nearly every weekend....great ridin out here in the Texas Hill Country..... and Luckembach is a pretty neat place to ride out to on the weekends...alot of bikes out there too.

tc
 

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In this article it is the first time I read about an issue I already realised as well:

When it’s time to slow things down, you’ve got those wonderful dual discs up front that can handle the entire job just fine, with only two fingers. That’s good, because the rear brake, on the other hand, is somewhat anemic. Hit it and the bike sort-of says, “Huh?”

Admittedly, part of the problem was the adjustment of the brake pedal, which was a bit of a reach for my size, and Suzuki says that can be adjusted to suit the rider's inseam. But it still took a hefty foot to effect any noticeable change in speed.
The rear brake really is a bit weak and the only time I really use it is, when I have to go to a full stop. Then I apply the rear together with the front brakes to make a more "balanced stop" which is smoother than front brakes only. But still the rear brake is not as useable as it should be, especially on a cruiser where the rear brake normally is the most used brake.

But there is no question that the front brakes are superior to anything I ever rode. You just need a dry and smooth surface for them to work.
Other than that, "machine breaking" or "gear braking" is the way to go and it needs a lot of thinking in advance to do it right.

Overall my impression is, that this bike is pretty demanding to its operators skills and it could easily overwhelm the abilities of a motorcycle newbie.
 

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That is the most honest and objective write up I've seen to date . . . :bigthumbsup:
 
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