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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
wanted to know had anyone went to a single disc ( left side ) on the front that has custom wheels, if so let me know the pros & cons thanks
 

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Here we go again.

One disk has more stopping power than your tire can deliver to the road. If it can lock up the front wheel, you are not getting any more stopping power. One disk, as proven by many bikes that have one disk, can lock up the front wheel just fine.

So, what are the real advantages to dual front disks? Prolonged braking. With 2 disks, the braking force is spread across the 2 disks. Thus, each disk does only half the job and builds up half the heat. A slower heat-up time means it will take you longer to reach 'brake fade', which is the decrease in performance of your brakes due to excess heat.

Now, the question is really, will most riders ever notice any difference? Do not get me wrong, there are those here that may push their bike to extremes and may actually be able to reach brake fade on one rotor. However, most riders will never see any real difference. The difference you will actually see is that you should expect to replace the pads on a one rotor rig twice as often as on a dual rig, but then you are only replacing 2 instead of 4, so that is really a wash.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
well one thing is for sure i tend not to use my front brakes that much to begin with, i've been riding over 20 years & i tend to downshift & use my rear brakes more & since my m109 is just for the city i dont see me really getting the chance to use all the power it possess, when i know im going far im on my silver bullet (2005 GL1800A Goldwing)
 

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Here we go again.

One disk has more stopping power than your tire can deliver to the road. If it can lock up the front wheel, you are not getting any more stopping power. One disk, as proven by many bikes that have one disk, can lock up the front wheel just fine.

So, what are the real advantages to dual front disks? Prolonged braking. With 2 disks, the braking force is spread across the 2 disks. Thus, each disk does only half the job and builds up half the heat. A slower heat-up time means it will take you longer to reach 'brake fade', which is the decrease in performance of your brakes due to excess heat.

Now, the question is really, will most riders ever notice any difference? Do not get me wrong, there are those here that may push their bike to extremes and may actually be able to reach brake fade on one rotor. However, most riders will never see any real difference. The difference you will actually see is that you should expect to replace the pads on a one rotor rig twice as often as on a dual rig, but then you are only replacing 2 instead of 4, so that is really a wash.
Spoken like a man who is in the know

however, if you knew you knew nothing you would know something.

let me give you just a couple of the calculations required when designing a braking system
Leverage muliplication (force-pivot point-m/cyl)
Hydraulic multiplication (M/cyl(s) bore size-Caliper(s) bore size)
distance from centre of hub (leverage/ force multiplication)
Resivouir size
Most important max hydraulic pressure
plus another 100 odd calcs required

having dabbled with braking systems (racing aplications) and I have seen what happens on a 109 when you take off one of the front disc's, the difference is huge.
you have just halved the stopping power of the front, which when ridden right, should be doing at lest 80% of the braking
You have also reduced brake cooling by half

good call Square Rounder

IMO
you can do it, but please get it done by a qualified tech with some knowledge on the subject

the gas man
 

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not trying to thread jack but has anyone used a perimeter break rotor on a 9? I saw one on a BMW and really liked the look
 

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One con is that you will not have the great stopping power.
Thats the biggest misconception ever, you ask how I know? Look :bigthumbsup: I can lock that bytch up if need be! It stops on a dime. I would suggest a steel braided line though.
 

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just because it can lock up the front wheel doesn't mean it can stop the bike faster or smoother, which is probably why suzuki went with two rotors instead of one given the size and weight of the 9. nearly all literbikes have two rotors in front, yet they weight much less, but they are there to assist in getting that bike down from speed quicker and smoother without having to overheat the brakes unnecessarily. just my .02 worth.

to the OP-
as you can see, this type of question will open up a can of worms. read the posts that will follow and make your own decision on what you feel you want to do. bottom line is YES it can be done, but some (like myself) will argue that it might not make the bike AS safe as if it had both installed.

be safe with whatever you decide.
 

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just because it can lock up the front wheel doesn't mean it can stop the bike faster or smoother, which is probably why suzuki went with two rotors instead of one given the size and weight of the 9. nearly all literbikes have two rotors in front, yet they weight much less, but they are there to assist in getting that bike down from speed quicker and smoother without having to overheat the brakes unnecessarily. just my .02 worth.

to the OP-
as you can see, this type of question will open up a can of worms. read the posts that will follow and make your own decision on what you feel you want to do. bottom line is YES it can be done, but some (like myself) will argue that it might not make the bike AS safe as if it had both installed.

be safe with whatever you decide.
If you have never ridden with it you really can't say can you. Not trying to be an a**hole, Im just speaking from EXPERIENCE. You may wear out the pad a little quicker but it has LITTLE to NO difference in stopping power. Its ultimately on you, do whatever makes you feel comfortable. :bigthumbsup:
 

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well one thing is for sure i tend not to use my front brakes that much to begin with, i've been riding over 20 years & i tend to downshift & use my rear brakes more & since my m109 is just for the city i dont see me really getting the chance to use all the power it possess, when i know im going far im on my silver bullet (2005 GL1800A Goldwing)
:eek: You've been braking wrong for 20 years:eek:

Or maybe your just used to Linked breaks on the wing .....we don't have that on the 9!
 

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Spoken like a man who is in the know

however, if you knew you knew nothing you would know something.

let me give you just a couple of the calculations required when designing a braking system
Leverage muliplication (force-pivot point-m/cyl)
Hydraulic multiplication (M/cyl(s) bore size-Caliper(s) bore size)
distance from centre of hub (leverage/ force multiplication)
Resivouir size
Most important max hydraulic pressure
plus another 100 odd calcs required

having dabbled with braking systems (racing aplications) and I have seen what happens on a 109 when you take off one of the front disc's, the difference is huge.
you have just halved the stopping power of the front, which when ridden right, should be doing at lest 80% of the braking
You have also reduced brake cooling by half

good call Square Rounder

IMO
you can do it, but please get it done by a qualified tech with some knowledge on the subject

the gas man
You sir, are out of line.

Who are you to assume what I know or do not know?

Run your numbers, I have.

You will confirm I am right.

I did not say to hack at it, just that it can be done safely and will still meet the needs of the average rider.
 

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i did it on my 05gsxr 1000 and just had to use my back brake with the front brake..easy to do so if you dont like the way it stops you can put it back on.
and it looks a lot better with it off,and easier to clean...:bigthumbsup:
 

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Keep in mind this is how these bikes were designed to be. Stopping a 700lb bike plus your weight is quite a bit. If the engineers at Suzuki thought one would be sufficient that's all they would have put on it. I would have lowered the cost of production down. I would doubt any of us have the degrees and skill set that those engineers have.

If you ride it like a cruiser (HD cruiser) and do not hit the twisties often or hard then one brake up front should be sufficient. But if you ride the twisties often and hard and do a lot of stop and go, why risk the brake fade?
 

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Keep in mind this is how these bikes were designed to be. Stopping a 700lb bike plus your weight is quite a bit. If the engineers at Suzuki thought one would be sufficient that's all they would have put on it. I would have lowered the cost of production down. I would doubt any of us have the degrees and skill set that those engineers have.

If you ride it like a cruiser (HD cruiser) and do not hit the twisties often or hard then one brake up front should be sufficient. But if you ride the twisties often and hard and do a lot of stop and go, why risk the brake fade?
Did the engineers do it or did the designers? The bike does not need a 240 but it has it. The bike does not need 1800cc but it has it. The bike does not need 2 front rotors, but it has them.

Just because it is stock does not mean it was there for engineering functional reasons. Just as many, if not more, features are there because a designer said that would sell better.

If you hit the twisties hard enough to see brake fade on one rotor, you should be getting about 1000-2000 miles out of a set of tires. I do not hit it that hard and doubt many do. Personally, I am not in good enough physical condition to do the cardio work it would take to run the bike that hard for that long.

As for the weight of the bike, that pales compared to your car. With 4 rotors total, it safely stops well more than 4 times the weight.
 

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If you have never ridden with it you really can't say can you. Not trying to be an a**hole, Im just speaking from EXPERIENCE. You may wear out the pad a little quicker but it has LITTLE to NO difference in stopping power. Its ultimately on you, do whatever makes you feel comfortable. :bigthumbsup:
actually I HAVE ridden one that only had a single rotor in the front, so unless you know what i have done, assuming that i hadn't and that you are the only one that has done this through experience is a big error on your part.

and even if i hadn't, i wouldn't have to experience the pain of falling off a third story building in order to know that it would hurt. :doh:
 
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