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Morning fellas! :D

I just had a question about something I was thinking about yesterday. I've added a number of performance parts to my bike (Pipes, K&N's, Intakes, Fi2000R) and I was wondering if before I was traveling at 100KPH at 3300RPM would adding 10HP cause the motor to do 100KPH at lets say...2900 rpm?

The only reason I'm asking is because I figured in my head that more power = less effort ...

If I am wrong, feel free to correct me!
 

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Morning fellas! :D

I just had a question about something I was thinking about yesterday. I've added a number of performance parts to my bike (Pipes, K&N's, Intakes, Fi2000R) and I was wondering if before I was traveling at 100KPH at 3300RPM would adding 10HP cause the motor to do 100KPH at lets say...2900 rpm?

The only reason I'm asking is because I figured in my head that more power = less effort ...

If I am wrong, feel free to correct me!
Your RPMs to speed ratio won't change based on power upgrades. This ratio is completely determined by gearing.....
 

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Age old stuff ............more power will only get you to 100mph faster ........but if you could get the motor to rev to say 8500 0r 9000 then we are talking because if say 1000rpm = 30 KM THEN 210 KMPH.....AT 7000RPM IF YOU COULD GET 8000 RPM THEN YOU WOULD BE DOING 240!!
 

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Adjusting RPMs

.

Motorcycles that have 'chain' drives allow you to replace the front and/or rear gear sprockets with ones that are smaller, or larger. The number of 'teeth' on each sprocket varies by the size as well.

The purpose is to adjust the ratio of engine rpm's (primary drive) to the number of rear wheel turns (final drive).

It's similar to changing gears on a 10-speed bicycle.

Typically both sprockets are changed out, and it can have a dramatic effect on the bike's performance. You can pick a front/rear sprocket gear ratio that gives you lower rpms for highway cruising, but the penalty is sluggish acceleration off the line (less torque).

Alternatively, you can pick a ratio that gives you quicker starts off the line, but the downside is higher rpms in all gears, which is most noticable and undesired when you're on the highway.

And unlike a 10-speed bicycle, you can't adjust the sprocket gear ratio while you're driving.

Changing the sprockets also affects the length of the chain. You might need to order a longer one, or cut some links out of the existing one.

Sometimes just the front or the rear sprocket is replaced to make minor adjustments to the rpm's. And sometimes a single sprocket is replaced due to clearance issues.

With a 'shaft' drive, you're limited by the gear ratio that was pre-determined by the designers. If a replacement shaft with different gearing were available, it would be an expensive item. And I suspect the hub housing at the rear wheel would have to be even bigger than it is.

In the case of the M109, the factory ratio appears to be optimum - it has fantastic low end torque, and it also cruises quite comfortably at 2,800 rpm @ 60 mph.

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