M109 Rider Forums banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
264 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My rear oil pan drain plug got stripped the other day. Not the plug, the drain hole. When I dropped the pan, it appears that someone has been in here before. I'm the second owner. There were no crush washers on the plugs, most of the small washers on the 14 retaining screws were missing, and there were a few places on the rim that looked like a gasket sealant had been used before. Most of the edges were completely clean though. My question is - do I use a gasket and/or sealant around the bottom of the pan? I always use a cork gasket and sealant when I drop my oil pan on the car or truck. Is it the same with this bike? Appreciate any help. Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,263 Posts
sealant

You should get a service manual and read 3-85
Short answer, yes, use Suzuki bond 1215 on the indicated surfaces, and new washers on the bolts.
Lots of places to get this stuff online if your dealer can't help you.
Best of luck.
Edit
I got curious and did a little reading. Seems like Three Bond makes all the sealants for Suzuki, Yahama, etc, they make 4500 products. Lots of folks swear by this sealant. Just a thin bead applied with a small 1/4 inch brush
http://www.bikebandit.com/threebond-engine-silicone-gasket-1211?WT.mc_id=1484958&CAWELAID=338430045
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
264 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the tip. I wonder if your typical Blue RTV sealant would be ok. I have some of that in the garage and wouldn't have to wait on the Three Bond coming in the mail. I will probably stop at the local auto store on the way home from work and see if they have any of the Three Bond sealant. I had to turn the pan over to the local machine shop to see if they could fix it with helicoil or Timecerts. I certainly don't want to spend about $250 for another pan.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,619 Posts
Grey Import Sealer

Thanks for the tip. I wonder if your typical Blue RTV sealant would be ok. I have some of that in the garage and wouldn't have to wait on the Three Bond coming in the mail. I will probably stop at the local auto store on the way home from work and see if they have any of the Three Bond sealant. I had to turn the pan over to the local machine shop to see if they could fix it with helicoil or Timecerts. I certainly don't want to spend about $250 for another pan.
I'm a professional bike mechanic and have tried about all sealers available. I have settled on one I that use for everything. It's grey import sealer. It's also called mega-grey, ultra-grey and sensor safe gray. It's available at any autoparts store. It's a lot cheaper than Suzuki brand sealer and it works as good or better than anything else I've used. It doesn't get stringy inside the motor like other RTVs.

The only thing I recommend is that you let it set up for 6 hours before you put fluids back in (and as should be the case with all sealers).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
264 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I stopped by Oreilly Auto Parts on the way home and saw each of the sealants that you just mentioned. I was about to buy the one labeled Copper Silicone Gasket for high temp applications. I believe it was made by the same company that makes the mega-grey stuff. Anyway, I didn't. I figured I'd try Advance Auto and see what they had. Since the machine shop still has my pan, there's no rush to get the sealant tonight.

By the way, today's 10 November 2010! Anybody know what that date means? It's the Marine Corps birthday. o-o-o-rah! Retired Gunny signing off.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
169 Posts
I'm a heavy mechanic and I would use an automotive senser friendly gasket glue. It will do the same job as the suzuki products and save you money. Put a nice thin bead don't use the whole tube
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,263 Posts
Heli coil

The machine shop should be able to install a heli coil and it will be stronger than the original threads. I used one on a spark plug hole that was cross threaded from the factory and blew the plug out on a Neon (Aluminum head) years ago. It held for the years my daughter drove it.
Yeah, any sealant will probably work, as long as it says sensor safe. I'd use the right one just not to worry about it myself. I got that info from a Seadoo forum, those guys really flog their engines, and rebuild them often, like every 100 hours for the turbos.
 

·
Radio Active Member
2007 Candy Sonoma Red
Joined
·
22,855 Posts
Out of curiosity, why the concern with it being a sensor safe sealant? Those are really needed when you are sealing something where the MAF or O2 sensors could be involved, but we don't have one of those. And it's in the oil pan so even the sensors in the air box wouldn't be exposed to anything. And it wouldn't hurt them anyway.

I use Seal All for almost anything I put together that is going to be exposed to oil or gasoline. It doesn't tend to string like most RTV's, it sets up quicker, sticks to almost everything, and is less flexible when cured. It is a little harder to apply, almost like applying a thin contact cement. Which it also does a pretty good job emulating if needed. :D

http://www.eclecticproducts.com/sealall.htm
You can pick it up at any auto parts store.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
142 Posts

This is the stuff I use on the forklifts I fix. I mostly use it on temepered steel gear box with aluminum covers. It responds well to vibration and heavy and thin liquids.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,619 Posts
Out of curiosity, why the concern with it being a sensor safe sealant? Those are really needed when you are sealing something where the MAF or O2 sensors could be involved, but we don't have one of those. And it's in the oil pan so even the sensors in the air box wouldn't be exposed to anything. And it wouldn't hurt them anyway.
I know it's sensor safe but that's not why I use it. It has a different chemistry than most RTV sealers. It doesn't use a peroxide cure which is why it's sensor safe but it has different properties.

It sets up harder (doesn't get stringy), doesn't squish out as much (it handles high torque apps better) and it simply is the best stuff I have used.

I have guys ride/haul/ship bikes to me from all over the country (I'm specialized) and I have one chance to get it right. It's not like they can just bring it back to me if I have a leak. It's the only sealer I trust.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
264 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I picked up the pan from the machine shop this morning. Everything looks great on it. Cost me $90 but that was better than $250 for a new one. I stopped and bought the mega-grey silicone gasket builder. I was missing 10 of the small gaskets for the retaining screws but I had some unused gaskets left over from working on my truck engine. I used a two-hole punch to punch out 10 holes which were the perfect size for the screws. I trimmed around them and they fit perfect. Now I'm just waiting for everything to set up for a while before I start putting the oil back in. Hopefully I'll be back on the road tomorrow. Fingers are crossed! Thanks to everyone for their comments and help. I really appreciate it. That's what a forum like this is great at.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top