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Recently in this board and also from other sources, I have been reading about inexperienced riders getting hurt because they are new to motorcycling and the equipment chosen is really to much to handle by beginners. The M109r is a beast that needs to be tamed. If you have never ridden before, please read this site, learn all you can about the bike, but make it a future purchase. Start off on a smaller more manageable steed. Your patience will be rewarded.
 

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Theoretically, what you say is true. This is my first bike, and have had very limited experience on motorcycles prior to this purchase. I had ridden maybe 100 miles or so on my uncle's Harley Road King Classic. I now have 3500 miles on my 109 in just over 8 weeks. I know for a fact that had I gotten something smaller, I would already be wanting something bigger and more powerful. It would really suck to outgrow a bike that quick. Also, the technique for driving an 1800cc bike is the same as driving a 250. That's why they use the small bikes in the MSF courses.... if you learn the techniques, it doesn't matter what size bike you use them on. Now, before you tell me to try and do a figure 8 on my 109 in the area that you can do it on a 250, please understand I'm talking about the technique. Obviously there are going to be differences in character between the two bikes. Now, all this being said, would I let my wife start out on this bike? Probably not. I guess the protective side of me would kick in over proven facts.
 

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I went from a 10+ year break in riding bikes back to ridding a 109 and it really is like starting all over again. Having said that, there's no way in the 700 Chinese version of Hades that I would have bought a small bike or a sport bike to "learn" on again, it would have been a waste of money. And lets face it, the 109 is actually better balanced and better handling that MOST of the smaller cruisers out there that I rode prior to getting one.
 

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taijiman said:
Recently in this board and also from other sources, I have been reading about inexperienced riders getting hurt because they are new to motorcycling and the equipment chosen is really to much to handle by beginners. The M109r is a beast that needs to be tamed. If you have never ridden before, please read this site, learn all you can about the bike, but make it a future purchase. Start off on a smaller more manageable steed. Your patience will be rewarded.
I disagree. It depends on the attitude of the new rider, among other things. If the new rider takes an MSF Basic Rider Training class, takes their time and respects the bike and doesn't try to "show off" or otherwise ride beyond their abilities then they will most likely be just fine. A friend of mine bought a VTX 1800 for his first bike. He's been riding it for 4 years and has yet to have a wreck, but he had the right attitude going into it and that makes all the difference in the world IMHO. :doorag:
 

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I would have to agree to a certain point.....
If you are a careful and respectful new owner you will be fine.... ease into playing..... if you have a death wish and wanna crank the throttle open at every instant, don't start out with a 109, you will hurt yourself......
somewhere in between... you gotta be the judge.... its one freedom we still have...
Even experienced riders will tell ya to respect this beast.....


on a another note... Safety courses: IMO I think should be required for ANYONE getting there license for the first time (regardless of age), should be required even before getting your temps....
 

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Moonbaby said:
on a another note... Safety courses: IMO I think should be required for ANYONE getting there license for the first time (regardless of age), should be required even before getting your temps....
+1

And may I say that in my MSF course there were at least 3 of us with previous riding experience and there were 6 of 12 under the age of 18
 

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I am one who agrees that the M109R is not a beginner's bike. Nor is any seriously large displacement single or twin. MSF is not set up to adequately prepare new riders for what is about to be an eye-opening and potentially painful experience when dealing with the negative aspects of engine braking on this beast. Especially in tricky situations like rain, sand, gravel, etc. Yes, some new riders learn quickly. Some do not and I feel sorry for those who learn the hard way what happens when rolling off the throttle under adverse conditions with 900cc’s per cylinder. :eek:
 

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Medic1210 said:
.. I know for a fact that had I gotten something smaller, I would already be wanting something bigger and more powerful. It would really suck to outgrow a bike that quick. ...
+1

If you understand how your body influences your surroundings, like if you've played sports or have experience using your body in an atheletic fashion, you should have no problem with the 109 as a first bike.

Wanting another, more powerful bike like the one on that 109 board you were reading about does not have to happen to you. Trust your ability to learn new things safely.
 

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My 109 was my first ever bike. My only other experience on a bike was as a kid riding with my Dad as a passenger. As others have posted, it's all about respect for the bike and how bad it can hurt you if you're not careful. My bike spent it's first two weeks at the car dealership that I work and I just rode it around the back lot on my lunch breaks and for a little while after work. for a month after that, the only streets it saw was the ones in my neighborhood. The hardest thing to me was leaning how to lean the bike in the slow corners or turning from a stop. Never riding before, I had to convince my mind to let me lean the bike so I could turn. I have a stubborn mind and it took a lot of convincing, but I still took my time at it. Due to hurricane Katrina, the local MSF(that used a small airport runway for it's course) had to find another location because of all the planes from the new orleans airport now being there. So I didn't take the MSF course for almost 2 months after I had the bike. I learned a lot in the course and can honestly say I wouldn't feel as comfortable on my bike if I hadn't taken that course.

Having the bike for 5 months now, I'm, still learning and still taking it easy. Yes, this bike is extremely powerful and fast and I love that, but I bought this bike just to be able to enjoy the ride. No rush in getting it over with.
 

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Well, This is my first bike in 30 years and I can tell you that it was a real hard beast to tame when I bought it the first day but I have taken the course and did learn some techniques but I can tell you this is the bike for my size and anything less wouldn't do! (6'1" 220lbs)

I did try the Vrod several times and none of the other bikes that even look bigger were as balanced as this bike. The idea of what you do and how you get hurt has to do with your experiences, I can tell you that I have done 140 with the bike and as amazing as it was, it's not what I wanna do all the time.

This is heavy cruiser and has to be handled properly! Otherwise this is a perfect bike for anyone who wants a big bike like this.
I am sure riding a 250 and then going to this really doesn't give you much experience as the handling and controlling this bike is so much different than any other bike I have ridden before.

All I can say is I wouldn't trade this for any other bike on the road, specially not the custom rods since they are really just a show bike and not to be ridden at all except going straight and looking good parked. :bigthumbsup:
 

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Other than riding a few dirtbikes when I was a kid, my first bike was a Yamaha Fazer purchased in 94. Rode it quite a bit for 2 1/2 years then sold. Had not ridden since. Decided to get back into riding and bought my 109 the beginning of June. Immediately took an MSF course.

This is a big, and very powerful bike... but I find it much more balanced and comfortable than the 250's in the MSF course. I'll be the first to admit, that I have yet to ride my 109 the extreme. I'm riding, and getting great enjoyment, from just cruising around town and a couple short road trips and keeping it to the speed limit..... at least until I have a bit more experience under my belt. This is my choice and I'm not even tempted to ride hard like many of the veterans on this board. They have the ability and experience and are capable of it. I know I'm not there yet, but will be in time.

That being said, I would have not gotten a smaller bike. It would have been a total waste of money and I would not be able to sell in a year and get a decent price. Therefore I got this bike knowing I'd take the safety course and work my way back into riding.

To each his own, but I have been comfortable with my choice as has my wife(the boss) :D

Mike
 

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I buy into the logic... sort of... the M isn't exactly the best bike for people to start on - there's a helluva lot better choices... the combination of size and power are kind of difficult...

...people CAN learn on this bike... I'd prefer they didn't if I were their family though. I'd say a cruiser in the 1100 - 1500 range would be a better "learning" cruiser...

...if a person wants to try learn on this bike - well, that's their choice. If a bike is less power responsive on the low end, I think the learning curve would be a helluva lot quicker. Might be cheaper too if you "learned" on a used bike.

What irks me a helluva lot more are kids starting with a Gixxer - some are staring on the 'busa. Any bike will get you into trouble but a race ready rocket is begging for someone who is inexperienced to become road paint.
 

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Bluecruzer said:
What irks me a helluva lot more are kids starting with a Gixxer - some are staring on the 'busa. Any bike will get you into trouble but a race ready rocket is begging for someone who is inexperienced to become road paint.
That's why most countries have tiered licensing. Heck, I had to putt around on a 50cc Vespa in order to prove myself worthy of moving up to the 250cc class. In hindsight, it was probably for my own good.
 

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I think all new riders should spend time riding in the dirt first before going on the pavement. It teaches you a lot about braking and throttle input plus it is softer when you go down, and you will go down. I have ridden on the street for over 34 years and my dirt bike roots have kept me alive. I have survived two on road crashes due to anothers fault but still felt like I could have been more aware even though I did nothing wrong. I used to hate riding through the middle of downtown in Tarrant and Dallas counties but I have adapted. I liken it to combat experience.....combat riding.....never let your guard down.
 
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ummmmm I've been riding for quit awhile but its on dirt, very little road time. This is my first road bike that I've owned. I've had it just over a month (got it July 7th) and have 4232 miles on it. Out of all the street bikes I've been on I think this one is by far the easiest to handle if its given respect and if you practice all the really cool things you learned in the multiple riding courses. Regardless of the bike its the practice that makes the difference, I still hit the parking lots in the mornings and do crazy things just to drill in my defencive riding skills and make sure that if anything major does happen I don't have to think about it I'll just react to it. (try a few high speed drills but not as much as I should)

I agree this is a big bike but dang it was soo good looking...(I think I might have even seen my name on it somewhere :joke:) and I just couldn't get myself on the scooter they where trying to sell me ;).
 
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I have to disagree here. I have found the 109 to be a very good handling and balanced bike. It has a lot of power, but that doesn't make it difficult to ride. I have 5000 miles on it so far and hae enjoyed every one. A 109 rider should be big and strong enough to handle a bike like this.
 

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I got my first linsence for "Light" motorcycle,,max 125cc in Sweden and then when you turn 18 you can get what ever size you want. I started out with my 400cc ( also had my accident with that one ), drove after that for another 15+ years. I remember how I just took it easy with my first 1100cc coming from a 750cc.

Now,,this M109 is my first bike in 12 years, I was rusty when I did this MSF course here in Michigan and it was really helpful to "revive" everything.
I think it is like learning to ride a bicycle,,once you have it in the basics it is there to stay and it just need practise.
So I think like "de-rusting" training every spring would help in states with not-so-nice bike weather during winter.

Of course the M109R is a lovely beast and should be treated that way. As a starter/beginner bike I think it needs a looot of respect if this is what you first ever sit on and you really need to be careful, you're sitting on a lot of power. :bigthumbsup:

Like the other day,,,I have just got out of breaking in, done-over-with. I just nicely pulled the throttle on an "average" 55 mph road with "average" gearshifting and voila,, I was doing 90mph like that,,and I had a WOW feeling,,,so be careful..it is a lot of bike,,I just love it. :D :D :D :D :bigthumbsup: :bigthumbsup: :doorag: :bigthumbsup:
 

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Medic1210 said:
Theoretically, what you say is true. This is my first bike, and have had very limited experience on motorcycles prior to this purchase. I had ridden maybe 100 miles or so on my uncle's Harley Road King Classic. I now have 3500 miles on my 109 in just over 8 weeks. I know for a fact that had I gotten something smaller, I would already be wanting something bigger and more powerful. It would really suck to outgrow a bike that quick. Also, the technique for driving an 1800cc bike is the same as driving a 250. That's why they use the small bikes in the MSF courses.... if you learn the techniques, it doesn't matter what size bike you use them on.  Now, before you tell me to try and do a figure 8 on my 109 in the area that you can do it on a 250, please understand I'm talking about the technique. Obviously there are going to be differences in character between the two bikes. Now, all this being said, would I let my wife start out on this bike? Probably not. I guess the protective side of me would kick in over proven facts.
Wow, Im sorry to disagree...I've been riding for about 40+ years...don't get me wrong...but there is no substitute for experience, none...dumb luck is really great to have but 100 miles on your uncle's road king means nothing...if you haven't taken the MSF basic and the advanced course along side of real experience, count yourself lucky that you've never been challenged by what riding a bike or unthinking cage drivers can throw at you...you are only fooling yourself. I hope I'm not coming off too preachy...this Bike we all share is a very accomplished beast...I have nothing but respect for it's abilities...and continue to further my own abilities as a rider, I'd only hope you would do the same...Ride smart , ride safe...always seek to better your abilities...just don't believe your own press.
 

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Trogdor said:
Wow, Im sorry to disagree...I've been riding for about 40+ years...don't get me wrong...but there is no substitute for experience, none...dumb luck is really great to have but 100 miles on your uncle's road king means nothing...if you haven't taken the MSF basic and the advanced course along side of real experience, count yourself lucky that you've never been challenged by what riding a bike or unthinking cage drivers can throw at you...you are only fooling yourself. I hope I'm not coming off too preachy...this Bike we all share is a very accomplished beast...I have nothing but respect for it's abilities...and continue to further my own abilities as a rider, I'd only hope you would do the same...Ride smart , ride safe...always seek to better your abilities...just don't believe your own press.
Exactly. Have you noticed the number of posts here where the only explanation for the cause of crash is something like, "next thing I remember was laying in a ditch" or "I just ran out of turn". Well, there's a reason for everything and most reasons could have been avoided with proper training and experience. This is especially true when it comes to seriously BIG twins. Go too hot into a turn, roll off the throttle and you're in for a surprise. A surprise in which you'll have a fraction of a second to respond correctly. You won't have time to think. You're reaction needs to be engrained in your brain. What happens when you brake too deeply into a turn and roll off the throttle with the clutch out on this monster? Your bike will fight to stand straight up and go straight! Hop on a two-stroke or 4 banger and do the same thing. You'll find minimal to non-existent engine braking and more wiggle room for corrections. Can this stuff be learned by trial and error by new riders on this bike? Certainly! But, you're taking a big risk learning on your own.
 

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After 25 years of not riding a bike, I bought an M50 last October. My reasoning was I should ride a more intermediate sized bike to get myself acclimated to riding again. In May of this year I just couldn't stand not have the 109 that I really wanted, so I went out and bought it. Before I got on the 109 I did some reading and I expected differences due to the weight and power. I expected the weight of the bike to come into play at slower speeds; the steering head to get progressively heavier in slow turns; the throttle response to be highly respected given the power of the bike combined with fuel injection and shaft drive; and the large rear tire to elicit more effort to effect the same turn characteristics. Having expected all of this and run through the effects in my mind, once I got on the 109, from the very first, I found it just as easy and predictable to ride as the M50. After 6,500 miles on it, I'll have to say I found the 109 vs the M50 to be no different if approached with the right mental preparation and expectation.

In all honesty, I truly believe had I just jumped right into the 109 instead of buying the M50, I don't think it would have posed any more challenge. I was mentally prepared for it's size and power, and It acts exactly like I expected it to.

Now I have two bikes and need to sell one. Anyone looking for a real clean M50?
 
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