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Maybe I've been under a rock or something, but I'd never heard of this until picking up a brochure for nitrogen filling tires instead of using regular air. Is there a legitimate benefit or is this a rip off? Anyone riding on nitrogen?
 
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I believe they use nitrogen to fill tires so the pressure remains constant. As a tire gets warm, the air inside it expands, increasing the pressure. Nitrogen will not expand. I don't think they have to use 100% nitrogen.
 

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Ok, so the question this raises for me is-- Isn't the recommended manufacturer tire pressures suggested for your bike, to keep tire wear even, taking into account the increase as the tire warms? In other words, your cold tire is filled to 42psi, but increases to say, 46psi while driving. Considering that most tire wear comes from a warm tire since the rubber is softer, then wouldn't the manufacturer suggest a pressure just under the 'true' ideal pressure (the warm pressure), knowing the pressure is going to increase during riding? If you use a gas that is going to remain at a constant temperature, is tire wear going to be negatively affected since it will never reach the warmed pressure of normal tires? In other words, should you fill the tire to a higher psi to account for hot tire pressures? Have I confused many people with that? I about confused myself.
 

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It's not about the nitrogen. It's about reducing the other gases in the air, mostly water vapor and oxygen. Water vapor is bad in a tire because as the tire heats up any moisture in the tire will become vapor, and this vapor takes up much more room than the liquid did, which inturn causes the pressure to rise in the tire. this is why the manufacturer's say to measure air pressure in your tires when cold, that way there is much less water vapor in the tire to skew results. another reason nitrogen is a little better is it is on the larger molecules in the air, so it is harder for it to get out which helps maintain correct tire pressure, not to count that if nitrogen is used it is much much drier. Now one could just put a good drier on there air compresser and drain the water off the tank everyday and get nearly as good results since most of the air that we all breath is 79% nitrogen anyway. I believe the amount of the other gases escaping the thru the tire is marginal at best and would take months to see a change, but that is just one of the selling points these people use to get people to switch to nitrogen.

ohh and nitrogen will also expand, as will every other gases known to man, it just expands much less than some other gases and significantly less than water vapor. just look at it this way at average room temperatures water is a liquid, and nitrogen is a gas. When you heat the tire up due to friction and by the tire flexing under load it will cheat the sir in the tire. if you take the tire from 75 degree to 180 degrees this will cause the most of the water to turn to vapor(and lots of it, 1 cubic foot of water will make about 2000cubic feet of water vapor) and the nitrogen will stay about the same.

I am not for it or against it, I just wanted everyone to be educated and decide for themselves. personally i don't use it, i just try to keep my air tank some what dry by draining it once a week or so.

On a side note I like playing with these peoples minds when they start trying to sell me on this, because most have no idea what they are taking about.
;)
 

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Welllllll... i will add a couple things and not get into arguements with anyone here...

Facts:

N2 (nitrogen)
Density - 1.25 kg/kg (approx)
Weight - 28 mol (approx)

O2 - (Oxygen)
Density - 1.42 kg/kg (approx)
Weight - 32 mol (approx)

Air - somewhere in between depending on where you are and what all is in it.... (Typically 79% N2, 20.95%O2, .05% everythign [email protected] sea level)

as far as size or leakage goes N2 will leak faster due to its weight and smaller size...

#1 reason.. to get rid of all the unknowns (moisture, hydrocarbons, sulfurs.. whatever else..)
#2 predictability... 100% N2 is the same the world over.. no matter what altitude, no matter what cliamte, no matter where you get it...

if ya really want any more details than this let me know... i figure this has gone way to geek already...
 

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I don't know about using nitrogen, but I have always sworn by using hydrogen to fill my tires. It is very light, thus making the 109 much lighter and faster. It also keeps you on your toes as any abrupt bump or large pot hole coudl cause a massive explosion killing me and anyone within a 30 foot radius. (this is a joke, do not fill your tires with any explosive gas)
 
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pizzmor said:
I don't know about using nitrogen, but I have always sworn by using hydrogen to fill my tires. It is very light, thus making the 109 much lighter and faster. It also keeps you on your toes as any abrupt bump or large pot hole coudl cause a massive explosion killing me and anyone within a 30 foot radius. (this is a joke, do not fill your tires with any explosive gas)
:p
 

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dry compressed air is already around 82% nitrogen so save your money - your not going to
feel or see the difference.....i've tried it on my sportbikes..........
 

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I am thinking about adding neon gas in my tires, so all i have to do is add a little neon and a little electricity and my tires would glow. :p
 

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They just want to charge you for the air. It's Bu##sheet. Air is free and Nitrogen is not.
lol, air is nitrogen...with a very small amount of o2 and other trace gasses
 

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Crow said:
I am thinking about adding neon gas in my tires, so all i have to do is add a little neon and a little electricity and my tires would glow. :p
:a20:
I'd love to see that one pulled off :joke: :joke:

Now if I could just find the clear rubber I might be able to rig something up :D the electricity might not work after the first rotation of the tire but it will look cool until the bike is moving :joke: :joke:
 

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jeffw said:
Racing is just about the only application.....
I used nitrogen in my Cessna 310. Well, until I sold it.
Ok it's fast, so I guess racing counts. hehe

Anyway, the point being (for the forum) that nitrogen is widely used for tires that can't (or shouldn't) have large pressure variations.
 

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Medic1210 said:
Ok, so the question this raises for me is-- Isn't the recommended manufacturer tire pressures suggested for your bike, to keep tire wear even, taking into account the increase as the tire warms? In other words, your cold tire is filled to 42psi, but increases to say, 46psi while driving. Considering that most tire wear comes from a warm tire since the rubber is softer, then wouldn't the manufacturer suggest a pressure just under the 'true' ideal pressure (the warm pressure), knowing the pressure is going to increase during riding? If you use a gas that is going to remain at a constant temperature, is tire wear going to be negatively affected since it will never reach the warmed pressure of normal tires? In other words, should you fill the tire to a higher psi to account for hot tire pressures? Have I confused many people with that? I about confused myself.
Yes, you'd use a higher pressure.

What to do to find out what "cold" nitrogen pressure to use:

1) Set the stock pressure with air and ride the bike to get the tires hot.
2) Stop and measure the tires hot.
3) deflate them and change over to nitrogen. Rinse, repeat. This will help get rid of most of the moisture in the tire. 2x is ok, 5x is best (it's a math thing).
4) set the pressure to stock or +1 or 2 psi and ride the bike to get the tires hot.
5) check the pressure and adjust with nitrogen until it's the same pressure as air when the tires are hot.
6) Ride again to make sure the tires are hot and the hot nitrogen pressure is constant and the same as the stock hot pressure.
7) Let the tires cool and measure the cold nitrogen pressure.

The last pressure is what you'll use to fill the tires with nitrogen from then on.

(Ok, I wrote this on a moment's notice, so please forgive me if it's a bit babbly...)Â :D
 

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pizzmor said:
I don't know about using nitrogen, but I have always sworn by using hydrogen to fill my tires. It is very light, thus making the 109 much lighter and faster. It also keeps you on your toes as any abrupt bump or large pot hole coudl cause a massive explosion killing me and anyone within a 30 foot radius. (this is a joke, do not fill your tires with any explosive gas)
From the "getting too geeky gallery"...
I remember a Mythbusters episode about a helium filled football supposedly flying farther - I think there was an argument about a seriously long punt...
Anyway, they tried it and lighter than air gas (helium and arguably anything ligher than air) made the football fly LESS. Although the football weighed less and in a vacuum would have gone farther for the same amount of force applied, the lighter ball wouldn't penetrate the air as well. It turns out it was a mass issue and heavier is actually better.

I guess that nitrogen would make the '109 brakes more efficient at high speed. 8)
 
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