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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am just curious, I rode dirt bikes long ago, back in my teen years, but have not rode anything two-wheeled (besides a pedal bike) for the past 10-15 years now.

How long does it normally take to "get back in the saddle" so to say?

Also, I have been just riding around my neighborhood, and taking the bike out on some country roads, to get used to the feel of it, as well as get used to riding again.

Any suggestions on ways to get used to the bike any quicker, or ways to get more comfortable on it... or am I doing just fine now, with taking it out for around 30 minutes at a time, getting used to how it feels?

I've already taken the MSF course, which taught me a lot on safety and accident avoidance (used those skills earlier today actually) just figure I could ask you experts for the best way to go...

I want to learn to ride safely and enjoy riding :)

Thanks all!!!

New Rider with a big grin on :)
 

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The M109R is a pretty big bike to be relearning to ride. I would suggest you practice what was taught at the MSF course in a safe place. Do you have an empty parking lot to practice the skills? Balance and control are really important. Try to stay away from traffic until you are really comfortable on the bike.
Be safe and keep the shinny side up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
taijiman said:
The M109R is a pretty big bike to be relearning to ride. I would suggest you practice what was taught at the MSF course in a safe place. Do you have an empty parking lot to practice the skills? Balance and control are really important. Try to stay away from traffic until you are really comfortable on the bike.
Be safe and keep the shinny side up.
I could ride on over to a school parking lot as they are out for the summer, but then I would have to go through traffic to get there, unless I found a trailer I could use till I got comfortable with the bike. So far I have gotten very comfortable on the streets around my house, as during the day they are basically empty, with just a few construction workers from time to time, who have helped my skill a TON actually, as I've had to practice quick braking and other skills a TON as they don't pay any attention to a bike on the road...

There is a country road behind my house that I went out on some, got it up to 55 and riding smoothly... did a few quick stops from that speed and it stops FAST, love how well this bike handles.... I just want to get really comfy on it over time, and enjoy it :)

Was just curious if anyone has any good ideas on what things to do to practice and get comfortable the best and safely on the bike... or does it really just take many miles and miles of practice riding, to get really comfy?

I just want to do this RIGHT, and enjoy it along the way... so one day I can be able to ride safely and enjoy the crap out of this wonderful bike :)
 

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I was an avid rider of mainly dirt bikes when I was alottt younger up until the time i got married and had my first child, I had no street experience i.e. no license at all until a few years back. My first bike back in the saddle was a Honda Shadow 1100. I got my license first the went and completed all the MSF courses offered here. When I was relearning and prior to being licensed I stuck to mainly side neighborhood roads and parking lots until I felt comfortable with my skills and the bikes abilties, and of course passed my license test. I recently traded that bike in for the M109 and even with this bike I treat as a learning process as there are things much different between it and my old shadow. All I can say is start slow, gain your confidence with both you and the bike then have fun.
"Live to Ride"
 

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You picked a good bike this bike is a blast to ride but you may have bought the wrong bike to learn on . All i can tell you is that really take it easy with this bike because the power is awesome. but there is no special trick you can do to learn how to ride better just time and Patience. Also don't do any thing on the bike you know you are not capeable of doing. And if you have the money to buy a smaller used bike till you learn and are comfortable riding again that would be the way to go. Good luck and be safe . 8)
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I've not gone into 4th gear yet... but have made it up to 3rd and had a grin doing it... took it out on the back country roads and had fun taking those curves... this bike handles GOOD!!!

In a way, I am glad that I am getting used to this bike around all these JERK CONTRACTORS WHO CAN NOT DRIVE, as my awareness is higher, and learned how to quick stop already...

This bike is amazing... can't wait till I can actually get her past 3rd gear and past 3k rpms... so far doing the break in, not let it go over 3k rpm, per the owner's manual....

:)
 

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I agree with what's been said already - you have chosen a very big and powerful bike to cut your teeth on. I have 2500+ miles on mine and I'm just getting comfortable with the size and power (been riding street bikes off and on for 20 years). Someone recommended maybe picking up a smaller, used bike to practice on. That would be the best scenario, but that's just my opinion. Whatever you do, be careful and don't let anyone tell you you're ready for something if you feel that you aren't. Good Luck! :bigthumbsup:

Edited to include: Be mindful of getting a flat tire around all that construction... not only do they not seem to know how to drive, they are also notorious for leaving behind all kinds of debris when they tear off in their trucks at the end of the day :duck:
 

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Practice, Practice, Practice....
If you haven't already...take the MSF course...then practice some more. I also have..and kept an 800 intruder which was my first bike. After riding the beast 130 miles last weekend I definately have found a LOT of differences and I know my limitations. Once you hit 4th gear don't let the thrill and power of this bike seduce you and believe me it can :eek: :D. Stay away form traffic and Practice, Practice Practice.

Ride safe...respect yourself....and the bike :bigthumbsup:

Devilish
 
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