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Hi guys I'm Doug from Houston TX just got my c109r on 5/13/11 from Florida. I've never road a bike before but I've wanted one for years. i got my class to learn how to ride this Thurs and wanted to know any tips tricks just basic info, also if and of you riders live in the cypress area wanna show me some tips that would be great
 

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Hi guys I'm Doug from Houston TX just got my c109r on 5/13/11 from Florida. I've never road a bike before but I've wanted one for years. i got my class to learn how to ride this Thurs and wanted to know any tips tricks just basic info, also if and of you riders live in the cypress area wanna show me some tips that would be great
Good luck dude....bugga.....starting on a 9.......respect dude....respect. :-\
 

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Welcome to the forum! Good luck with your msf course and take it easy til you get used to the bike. That's a big, heavy, powerful bike to be starting out on.


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Welcome to the forum! Good luck with your msf course and take it easy til you get used to the bike. That's a big, heavy, powerful bike to be starting out on.

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:agree:and :welcome: you got a great bike :congrats: but as stated be careful.
 

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Good luck with your class. Just know the bike you'll be using in class is WAY different than the 109. Respect your bike and take your time to learn it well. My M109 was my first bike as well but I took at least two years to get comfortable on mine.
 

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:agree::welcome:and :congrats:! One things for sure you started at the top ! Just take it easy and learn your bike ! :bigthumbsup:
 

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Couple of things to remember:
1. She's a big girl and heavy. It's center of gravity is fairly low so it turns and manuvers well. But when you're stopped and you allow it to tip beyond a certain point, it's going to lay down. The secret is don't let it get to that point of lean.
2. Contrary to what you're friends may say, what you see on TV or what you might see on the road, the indicator of a good bike handler is not how fast you can go or how well you swerve thru traffic. It is how well you handle your bike at low speeds and in parking lots. When I teach some one to ride, I take them to mall parking lots on Sundays or schools on the weekend and set a course with cones (if you have them; blocks of wood if you don't). Learn how to turn at very low speeds both left and right. Once you mastered that, do it slower. Practice S turns around cones and circles around cones. Park on up hills and on side hills. Do everything they taught you at MSF plus a lot more.

MSF is the minimum needed to get you on the road. You need more and more practice. In aviation there is a saying that goes "there is no substitute for flying hours". That means on bikes you need to put on the miles. Drive as often and as frequently as you can. You might not think you're learning anything after a long boring trip but your body is. You need to be able do the most basic functions on a bike by reflex and correctly. When you put on the miles, you practice those things with out even thinking about.

Lastly, always where a helmet. If you don't think you need one do this one basic experiment. Have your GF drive a car and you hang out the passenger side a bit on some back road. Take a 10 pound watermelon and drop it from door height at 50 MPH (go faster or slower, if you want; it's the same results). Stop and go back and look at your watermelon - that's why you need a helmet.

After you have worked your ass off making yourself a good driver, when you have the right gear and your bike is safe - go out and enjoy yourself!
 

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:congrats: you are starting with a beast for your first bike. The little bits of advice I can give you that's not taught in any glass are these:

1. It's like chess. Always, Always be at least 3 moves ahead, so that you have options if something happens.

2. Always know what's going on around you, 360 degrees.

There are so many things that you will learn just from riding. Always respect any bike, no matter what size it is.:bigthumbsup:
 

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I had a hard time starting out on this bike after having ridden for 3 years on a 250. Starting on a 250 was easy especially considering the class is instructed with a 250. Jumping from a 250 (235lbs) to an 1800 (850lbs) is a huge difference, I don't think I would have made it starting out on 1800. Some of the incidents with nearly dropping the 250 that were saved simply due to the fact that you can pick it up with one hand would not have been pretty on with the 109.

Best of luck to you!
 

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That is one of the biggest, heaviest, most powerful bikes on the market.....show it lots of respect while you gain experience and you'll have a GREAT time!! :p
 

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my hat off to you for starting with such a beast. Myself I started with the C50, glad your here so like everyone has said practice, and welcome
 

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My best advice would be to ride within your limits. It is easy to allow yourself to ride faster than you are comfortable with, especially when riding in a group.
Take your time, learn the bike, and enjoy it!!!!!
 

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Welcome to the board, Ive ridden for over 35 years and I wouldnt recommend the beast for a first bike,but will guarantee you wont grow out of the c109,lots of good advice here and lots of info:congrats:
 

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just take your time it has alot of power but where is it written that you have to use it all.this m109r is my first bike just took my time and respected the bike.dont try to keep up with others.learn wat she can do and wat you can handle.good luck.hit me up when you want to ride.
 

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Although I have an m109r, I think I can speak for the c109r folks. Power and handling will be completely different. The most useful thing about a smaller bike, is getting used to the controls and basic techniques on a bike that is a bit more forgiving. It is not as likely to spank you if you lean it too far, or inadvertently give it too much throttle.

With that said, if you take your time and respect the 9 while you learn, you will be fine.
 
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buy some beefy engine/crash bars (just incase)
Practice practice practice!

Find a nice parking lot with no cars....or if you're in a location where your streets are empty...practice those figure 8's, slow speed turns....

Remember not to go too fast INTO a turn....you can never go "too slow", yet too fast will get you every time....If you have to break while in your turn, you're going too fast....

Relax be confidant, but not over confidant....that will get you every time

Good luck and hope to read about your happy two wheeled adventures!
 

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Wow Thats a lot of bike to start with, i would say ride with experienced riders for a while until you learn the beast, i honestly would have you learn on something smaller and more forgiving,, be carefull.....:welcome: to the site.
 
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