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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Is it bad to have miss matched tires? By that I mean, a Bridgestone in front and Metzeler in rear? Would the average rider notice the difference if any? Is there any safety concerns?

I have about 15k miles on my 90. I am going to replace the rear this week, this will be the 3rd tire including the original. Looks like I'm getting about 7500 miles a tire, which doesn't seem bad. I am on my 2nd front, it got replaced around 12k.
The thing is my drive has changed from 70 miles highway/5 miles curves to 15 miles highway/20 miles curves. Now the curves aren't mountian switchbacks or anything but still drag pegs.
So I have been reading up on here and see there are some tires out there that are supposed to stick better then the stock bridgestones, if i switch brands in the rear should I switch the front too?

Thanks,
Kevin
 
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In general it is not a good idea to mix and match. But alot of people do it. It should be an informed descision though. Your front tire and rear tire have to work together to provide the proper balance of performace characteristics. Manufacturers know these requirements and build their tires as a matching set. As an example you want the front tire to have more traction than the rear in breaking and turning so that the front doesn't start to slide first. If it does you crash. If the back slides first you can recover and you have more feel for that limmit, in general. So if you were to mix tires and end up with a harder compound on the front, it will most likely slide first and you'll crash. The stiffness of the carcus is another area where they need to work together as well. If the way they react to bumps is really different it could cause and oscillation (weave) after hitting bumpy pavement. You really should know what you're doing when you step outside the box. There are people who do it and say it works fine, but I wouldn't copy them unless they can explain how their descision was based on some knowledge of what they're doing.

In your situation I have opted for another matching rear tire and changed them both when the front needs changing. But if you really want the handling now, go for a new set.

Now which ones you choose is a whole nother" can of worms. :bigthumbsup:
 
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This comes from a guy who has 260 as back tyre. ;)
And your point is?????

It's still a metzeler ME 880 Radial same as the front. If you know how tires work, like I do, You'd know, it is, a propper choice.

Now the 160 rear, run backwards, on the front, Now that's crazy, right?:D
 

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My point was that using larger tyre affects the handling characterics as well due unsprung mass and tire profile change. It is just as (or more) dangerous as using mixed tires that are both recommended by manufacturer.
 
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My point was that using larger tyre affects the handling characterics as well due unsprung mass and tire profile change. It is just as (or more) dangerous as using mixed tires that are both recommended by manufacturer.
It is not a danger at all if you know what those changes actually do and how a tires profile works with the geometery and and the other tire on a motorcycle.

The taller more rounded profile of the 260 helps the 9 turn better, reduses the countersteering effort, and has a higher load rating. All positive changes, and is therefore a better, safer choice than the original tire size. Nothing like the risk of mixing brands and ply designs. I know and understand the physics involved of how a motorcycle turns and the tires roll in that process. The size and profile are very important to optimizing a motorcycles turning capabilities. The stock sizes on the 9 are within an acceptable norm and rated for the use range of the bike. But they are not optimal for the best handling. The Metz ME 880's 240/260/280/300 (on the right size rims) are all rated for the same use perameters and are of superior construction and capability than the stock Dunnies. Each has a different profile and weight rating. Of those, the 260 has the best profile for handling performance due to the rate of turning diameter change under lean increase. That means that for a given lean angle it will turn a tighter circle than any of the other profiles. The style thing of having a big fat rear tire causes all of these fat azz cruisers to have too wide a rear turning radius for good handling. The 260 addresses that an provides an improvement in all aspects of performance compared to the stock size and consruction. Therefore it is not a risk to use it in any way shape or form.
 

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:agree:Guess he told you...LOL. I think I will do what Pegasus said. I was looking at getting new tires this week thanks for the info. Are your tires on the stock rims.
 
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