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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Markham-20130803-01059.jpg Markham-20130803-01062.jpg Markham-20130803-01063.jpg Markham-20130803-01065.jpg Markham-20130803-01066.jpg

Remove Tank with less then 1/3 Fuel. Lay upside down on a rug and and remove PUMP slowly and carefully. Flip the Rubber Boot off to the side and remove Metal clip and slide off plastic fitting of filter. Look How Dirty the Filter is compared to the New White one. 3 Parts you will need are in the 4th Image with part numbers. O Ring for the Trap Door on the Bottom of the Tank, Metal Clip and Filter. Bike Runs so much better now with clean filter. I would suggest doing it by 15K I waited to 35K and would get stalling at stop signs and it got worse that even when pulling out to pass on hard accell it would just stall out cough and burp. Its only $60 and worth it.
 

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I hate internal fuel filters... May work on adding an external one since the bike only have 600 miles on her.

Darrin
 

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That doesn't look like the fuel filter, that looks like the fuel strainer on the inlet side of the fuel pump.

No-one has ever posted up a picture of the actual fuel filter, at least I have never been able to find one. :dontknow:
 

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That doesn't look like the fuel filter, that looks like the fuel strainer on the inlet side of the fuel pump.

No-one has ever posted up a picture of the actual fuel filter, at least I have never been able to find one. :dontknow:
If the 90 is like the 109, there is another filter inside the pump. It cannot be replaced, have to replace the entire pump. Therefore it is wise to keep it from getting dirty to begin with by keeping the strainer in good working order.
 

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Did your bike have any issues when it was low on gas(like one dot left) feeling like it was starving for gas.Mine is doing this.I'm also a little over 40k
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Remove Tank with less then 1/3 Fuel. Lay upside down on a rug and and remove PUMP slowly and carefully. Flip the Rubber Boot off to the side and remove Metal clip and slife off plastic fitting of filter. Look How Dirty the Filter is compared to the New White one. 3 Parts you need are in the 4th Image. O Ring for the Trap Door on the Bottom of the Tank, Metal Clip and Filter. Bike Runs so much better now with clean filter. I would suggest doing it by 15K I waited to 35K and would get stalling at stop signs and it got worse that even when pulling out to pass on hard accell it would just stall out cough and burp. Its only $60 and worth it.
 

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Again, don't know if this pertains to the 90 as well. But on my 109, when the in-tank strainer was bad, it did not matter whether the tank was full or not. It idled poorly, would not accelerate, died for no apparent reason, etc. New strainer and it was all fixed up.
 

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Changed mine recently also and it made a difference around 20,000 miles. It was almost impossible though to get it on as the fit between the strainer and fuel pump is so tight you will thing you have the wrong part. I followed one of the posts and soaked mine in gas for a few hours and I finally got it on. It is a very easy part to break also while you are wrestling with it. Please enlighten on any method other than the gas method you used to expand the plastic on the filter.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
YES YES

Did your bike have any issues when it was low on gas(like one dot left) feeling like it was starving for gas.Mine is doing this.I'm also a little over 40k
Yes it was brutal... less then 1/3 of a tank was deadly... would die coming to a stop sign and die on hard accel. Its all better now and I have done 220K ran it down to bone dry and no stalling no issues just from that siimple change. I also ran a full bottle of sea foam though to try to clean the internal fuel pump filter best I can when the fuel strainer filter was fresh.
 

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Again, don't know if this pertains to the 90 as well. But on my 109, when the in-tank strainer was bad, it did not matter whether the tank was full or not. It idled poorly, would not accelerate, died for no apparent reason, etc. New strainer and it was all fixed up.
I thought the same on my previous bike, but the fault came back. I think all the moving about unsettles the crap in the 'fuel filter' and has little to do with the strainer.

Then I found out about the 'hidden' fuel filter. Back flushing with carb cleaner while poking with soft copper wire cleaned it up. Restored all the power I hadn't realised I'd lost. Had it gone to the dealers it would have been 'bend over' time......:eek:
 

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strainer

If the 90 is like the 109, there is another filter inside the pump. It cannot be replaced, have to replace the entire pump. Therefore it is wise to keep it from getting dirty to begin with by keeping the strainer in good working order.
how do you keep a strainer in good condition?
 

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how do you keep a strainer in good condition?
Change it out every 8k or so. Not sure what Suzuki recommends.

Or, add an in-line fuel filter outside of the tank which is what I will be looking into.
 

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Change it out every 8k or so. Not sure what Suzuki recommends.

Or, add an in-line fuel filter outside of the tank which is what I will be looking into.
I replaced mine at 25K. I bought a new filter a few years back but never got around to replacing it till recently. Anyway, it looks pretty good compared to others I've seen. I have an extra fuel pump and decided to take it apart to look for an additional screen. I could not find one, so if there is one, it is in the pump itself, like Cbxer55 said. One thing I did notice is the orifice on the output of the pump itself is tiny. Probably wouldn't take to much to clog it up.

fuel_pump.jpg
 

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Blew up the fuel pump portion of the fuel system cutaway diagram in the service manual. Thought it may show an internal fuel pump filter. Hard to tell.

Fuel_Pump_Cutaway.jpg
 

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That doesn't look like the fuel filter, that looks like the fuel strainer on the inlet side of the fuel pump.

No-one has ever posted up a picture of the actual fuel filter, at least I have never been able to find one. :dontknow:
The fuel filter is located inside the fuel pump, and can't be serviced. You would have to replace the entire pump. So, the fuel strainer has been called a fuel filter for that reason.
I wouldn't get hung up on what it's called. Bottom line, Unless you want to replace the fuel pump regularly, you'll be replacing the strainer we all call a filter.
 

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Nice job on the tutorial Josh. Such an easy thing to do, to restore performance.

Come to think of it, mine had 32,000 Kms on the original filter. :eek:
 

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Thanks

Thanks for the how-to ChiWaWa; I replaced my fuel filter this weekend using your steps.....worked like a charm. :bigthumbsup:
 

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The fuel filter is located inside the fuel pump, and can't be serviced. You would have to replace the entire pump. So, the fuel strainer has been called a fuel filter for that reason.
I wouldn't get hung up on what it's called. Bottom line, Unless you want to replace the fuel pump regularly, you'll be replacing the strainer we all call a filter.
Something doesn't exist so rename another part? Sounds like a strange idea to me. Can I rename the cooling fan a turbo since I can't find one in the manual? :p:p:p

On a more serious note, having no filter on the pump must mean more junk getting though to the tiny filters on the injectors? I recently had a poor running/idling problem on one of my other bikes. Originally it would not pull over 100mph and was very lethargic. Replaced the pump and filter and all seemed great for a few months. Then months later riding through France, the engine would die when I came to a stop and power was definitely reduced. When I got back to the UK I removed the injectors and put them into an ultrasonic cleaning bath (cheaper to buy then send off 4 injectors) and after that, I could see that what looked like black holes (where the fuel rail connects) were in fact holes with small, white filters in. Reconnected the injectors and the bike fired up and runs great again.
Now this bike was built in '99 and spent most of it's life just sitting doing nothing in a garage somewhere. I expect the original pump problem and then the later injector problem was caused more by lack of use then small particles in the fuel. But the 9 not having a fuel FILTER does get me a little worried about where any small particles would be caught.

Thanks for the great info and diagram, at least I know not to tear the pump unit apart looking for a filter. :bigthumbsup:
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Glad to hear

Thanks for the how-to ChiWaWa; I replaced my fuel filter this weekend using your steps.....worked like a charm. :bigthumbsup:
All my problems are gone and the bike is running great. I did run an entire bottle of seafoam through it in the first tank of fuel to clean out anything that might have been in the fuel pump as per the debate above. Bike is running smooth.

Glad to hear it helped you Englee1
 

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Something doesn't exist so rename another part? Sounds like a strange idea to me. Can I rename the cooling fan a turbo since I can't find one in the manual? :p:p:p

LOL. It's called a fuel filter by most, because calling it a strainer confuses the process of replacing it to some that are looking for an actual fuel filter to replace. Nothing strange about that.
A cooling fan and a turbo, isn't exactly what I see as good comparison to prove your point again. We already know the filter and strainer are different, those that don't know will benefit from us calling it a filter. :)

In the end, glad you now know not to tear down the fuel pump.
 
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