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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Did you know where the V-twin originated from?
It was a radial machine from an aircraft!

And now look at these :eek:





When it goes after John Levey, you need at least SEVEN heads in starformation to get a decent motorcycle engine!
He planted an R 2800 Rotec-Motor from an airplane on a chopper and presented them at several shows.

This motor is air-cooled, does have around 110 hp and 216 Nm torque :yikes:
John says it is unnecessary to watercool the motor, because of his large surface area...

History of Radial Engines

The first radial engines were produced towards the end of the 19th century; several years before the V-twin was introduced in motorcycles some consider it to be basis for the V-twin engine configuration. When studying the internal design of both with a master and articulating rod assembly, having worked on both it is plan to me that the V-twin was born simply by hacking off the top two cylinders of a radial.

Some very early radial motor designs rotated with the crankshaft and where called radial rotary motors the inertia produced when spinning that much mass proved to make aircraft and motorcycles difficult to handle. Yes an early motorcycle design had the motor rotating inside of the wheel.

Never confuse a radial motor with a rotary engine developed by Wankel decades later.
Radials are piston motors and always have an odd number of cylinders from 3 all the way up to 9. When stacked together creating rows usually up to 4, some of the largest piston engines ever made -Â 4,000+ horsepower were produced.

Aircraft mechanics know the sound of a radial much the same way you know the sound of a V-twin. Listen to the sound at the beginning of this website no motor sounds even close to a radial and no motor looks as beautiful as a round motor either.

With 7 cylinders all the way around the crankshaft there is no need for large counter weights to keep this motor turning smoothly and any engine builder will tell you the shorter the crankshaft the tougher the motor. Radials have run continually for over 5 years generating electricity and the radial was the motor of choice for the Sherman tank. Their durability matches that of diesel engines.

JRL would like to invite a few people to experience true old school in a new school chopper. It will be your responsibility to keep the radial story alive. This motor flew more men into battle than any other motor; it’s time it took you too. Â

You may go to Johns Website for more info at

http://www.jrlcycles.com

Now THAT would be a radi(c)al MOD for the 109! LOL!
What engine orientation would you like more, inline or confronting the wind?
 

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The silver bike was actually built by Jesse James.
And that plane is all wrong. They didnt do bling during WWII. Specially not in the navy :eek:
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the head up about the silver bike being made by Jesse James, because I had no idea who did that one.
But it was fitting the thread and added to diversity, to show that the star motor can be build in several orientations.

The star motor looks a bit wide for a bike if he is put confronting the wind, huh?
 

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Very interesting stuff. Thanks to all who contributed. :clap2:
 

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cbxer55 said:
The plane is a NOrth American T-28 Trojan. It was used as a trainer for Naval Airmen form the late 40s all the way through til the 90s. It was recently replaced by a turbo-prop type aircraft.

The largest, most powerful radial engines were the Pratt and Whitney Wasp Majors. These had 4 rows of 7 cylinders. Each row was slightly staggered from the one in front of it for cooling, and a lot of baffling. These were 2 stage turbo-supercharged and put out 3500 HP. 6 of these were used on the Convair B-36 Thundering Peacemaker, a 50s era bomber. It also had 4 General Electric J-47 turbo-jets of 5000 pounds thrust apiece.

Radials definitely have a unique sound. I used to hang out at Fox airfield in California. This is where the tankers flew from when fighting wildfires. They flew Douglas DC-6 and 7s, Consolidated PB2Y Privateers, Lockheed P2V Neptunes (these have 2 radials and 2 jets), Lockheed C-130 Herdules and P-3C Orions (these latter 2 are powered by 4 turbo-props). I always ;oked hanging around the approach end of the runway. When the big radial engined birds came in, they would touch-down and throttle back. Lots of back-firinrg and flames out the tail-pipes. Lovely sounds from cool old planes.

Robert Hill
Midwest City, OK.
I thought most of P&W engines in WWII were based in rows of 9 cylinders.................. the p-47, F4U, F6F , B-17 and many more have 18 cylinder engines AFAIK (including copys of the P&W engines made in Japan and by BMW for the FW-190s)
 

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You guys never cease to amaze me...
Thanks for the cool info and pix. :bigthumbsup:
 
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ppridgen1 said:
just for sh#ts and giggles ,A man down the road from me just died and in his shed there's a supercharged v12 (inverted) sitting there collecting dust.They said it was from a korean era bomber!prolly get it sheap as he was a junk collector from hell
You should go snap a few pics of that thing...I'd like to see it.
 

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Bonehead said:
I thought most of P&W engines in WWII were based in rows of 9 cylinders.................. the p-47, F4U, F6F , B-17 and many more have 18 cylinder engines AFAIK (including copys of the P&W engines made in Japan and by BMW for the FW-190s)
No I see how my wifei feels when I speak with her about the cobra pipes, JSD, 260 tires, etc.... :D
 

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Bonehead said:
I thought most of P&W engines in WWII were based in rows of 9 cylinders.................. the p-47, F4U, F6F , B-17 and many more have 18 cylinder engines AFAIK (including copys of the P&W engines made in Japan and by BMW for the FW-190s)
I believe the 18 over the 9 original is why they called the 18 the Double Wasp.
 

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Dickschiff said:
Did you know where the V-twin originated from?
It was a radial machine from an aircraft!

And now look at these :eek:





When it goes after John Levey, you need at least SEVEN heads in starformation to get a decent motorcycle engine!
He planted an R 2800 Rotec-Motor from an airplane on a chopper and presented them at several shows.

This motor is air-cooled, does have around 110 hp and 216 Nm torque :yikes:
John says it is unnecessary to watercool the motor, because of his large surface area...

History of Radial Engines

The first radial engines were produced towards the end of the 19th century; several years before the V-twin was introduced in motorcycles some consider it to be basis for the V-twin engine configuration. When studying the internal design of both with a master and articulating rod assembly, having worked on both it is plan to me that the V-twin was born simply by hacking off the top two cylinders of a radial.

Some very early radial motor designs rotated with the crankshaft and where called radial rotary motors the inertia produced when spinning that much mass proved to make aircraft and motorcycles difficult to handle. Yes an early motorcycle design had the motor rotating inside of the wheel.

Never confuse a radial motor with a rotary engine developed by Wankel decades later.
Radials are piston motors and always have an odd number of cylinders from 3 all the way up to 9. When stacked together creating rows usually up to 4, some of the largest piston engines ever made - 4,000+ horsepower were produced.

Aircraft mechanics know the sound of a radial much the same way you know the sound of a V-twin. Listen to the sound at the beginning of this website no motor sounds even close to a radial and no motor looks as beautiful as a round motor either.

With 7 cylinders all the way around the crankshaft there is no need for large counter weights to keep this motor turning smoothly and any engine builder will tell you the shorter the crankshaft the tougher the motor. Radials have run continually for over 5 years generating electricity and the radial was the motor of choice for the Sherman tank. Their durability matches that of diesel engines.

JRL would like to invite a few people to experience true old school in a new school chopper. It will be your responsibility to keep the radial story alive. This motor flew more men into battle than any other motor; it’s time it took you too.

You may go to Johns Website for more info at

http://www.jrlcycles.com

Now THAT would be a radi(c)al MOD for the 109! LOL!
What engine orientation would you like more, inline or confronting the wind?

The engine in the airplane looks like our older warsp Pratt and Whitney engine,WW2 Engine.
 

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cbxer55 said:
I cannot recall anything we built that used an inverted V-12. NOw during WWII a lot of german aircraft used inverted V-12s,
the Messerschmidt ME-109 being one of them. All of our WWII and Korean war stuff was either Allison or Packard-Merlins. These were all upright V-12s. That inverted V-12 mught be worth a lot of money to somebody in, say, the Confederate Air Force. There are a lot of folks restoring older aircraft that might be interested in that hunk of rusty metal. You might want to look closer, get some photos, and put out some feelers on it.

Robert Hill
Midwest City, OK.
+1 the ME-109, FW-190Ds and the HE-111 were fitted fitted with this ( Damlier-Benz ) inverted V-12s :bigthumbsup: ................. the the easy way to tell war era 109s and 111s ( they had the exhaust exiting the side of the cowl near the bottom) and the Spainish post war ones (and retofitted war models in the SAF) they were fitted with Rolls Royce Merlins ( had the exhaust exiting near the top of the cowl) ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
LOL! 48 cylinders looks a bit overkill and I doubt that this bike is handling any kind of being streetworthy.

We have some crazy guys over here as well.
Look what they made out of 24 leftover chainsaws, lots of belts a blowtorch and much of sparetime:


The Dolmette...

Back to the star-engine:
I wonder if those engines give problems cornering, due to the gyro effect?
They must have great stability but I think they would be pretty unwilling to change direction...
 
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