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Here ya go...

 

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Man, that sure looks nice. I really like the inner visor and the flip up face. You're gonna have to give a good detailed review after you've put a few hundred miles in it. Ok, now the questions we all want to hear. What's the total price, including shipping in US dollars? How long did it take to arrive after you ordered it?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I bought it from a guy on Ebay. The cost in US dollars including shipping was $250.21. It was sent from Belfast on 9-4 and I got it in Florida today! Here's the guys link, by the way these helmets are brand new on the market and not many stores have them.

http://stores.ebay.com/betterthedeal-co-uk

Ric
 

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nice...but flip-ups are usually a little noisy for my taste. hows that one?
 

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Those helmets are not 100% safe....they are nice but I notice yours are only ACU GOLD Approved...no Dot and certainly not Snell I see . Those helmets also
have a warning disclaimer on them in fine print on the helmet stating that they do not offer full protection...use at your own risk.

They also tend to be heavier...and very noisy ! Just wanted you to know...looks good though .
 
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Aren't Snell and DOT both US Ratings? These helmets are from Europe. I am sure their ratings are different. I know Snell considers flip up helmets the same as open face and my understanding is you can't get a Snell rating on an open face.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Actually from what I've read the European testing and ratings are equal if not better in some areas than US standards.
As far as noise...I put it on last night and drove maybe 10 or 15 miles and it seemed to have a very nice feel to it and very quiet. But then again anything is quieter than 70 MPH with no protection. Plus it was nice not getting smacked in the face with all the bugs. :bigthumbsup:
 

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clone1008 said:
Actually from what I've read the European testing and ratings are equal if not better in some areas than US standards.
As far as noise...I put it on last night and drove maybe 10 or 15 miles and it seemed to have a very nice feel to it and very quiet. But then again anything is quieter than 70 MPH with no protection. Plus it was nice not getting smacked in the face with all the bugs. :bigthumbsup:
I have a good friend that sells a lot of helmets on ebay and most of those are to European customers. maybe I can get him to come over here and give us an education on rating and such. The guy really know his helmets. :doorag:
 

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Lamonster said:
I have a good friend that sells a lot of helmets on ebay and most of those are to European customers. maybe I can get him to come over here and give us an education on rating and such. The guy really know his helmets. :doorag:
I would be really interested in some in depth stuff on helmets..I've had a few and am getting sick of finding something 'better' just after I buying a new one.
 

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toneout said:
Aren't Snell and DOT both US Ratings? These helmets are from Europe. I am sure their ratings are different. I know Snell considers flip up helmets the same as open face and my understanding is you can't get a Snell rating on an open face.
There is one flip-face that has passed snell approval... and I don't think you'd want to pay for it 8) Lost the link to it, but it came from this site if you do a search.

I emailed the European distributor in the UK to see if they would sell helmets in the US and to ask them how the ECE rating compares to Snell and DOT.

As I understand it, and my understanding may be wrong here, if you're wearing an unapproved helmet but meet the requirements for riding without a helmet then there's no issue. But hey, I'm giddy about being able to sleep in my own bed tonight (after > a month)... prolly gonna have to dust my entire house this afternoon.... Guess I'll find out if the Ionic Breeze was worth the money or not 8)
 

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clone1008 said:
Actually from what I've read the European testing and ratings are equal if not better in some areas than US standards.
As far as noise...I put it on last night and drove maybe 10 or 15 miles and it seemed to have a very nice feel to it and very quiet. But then again anything is quieter than 70 MPH with no protection. Plus it was nice not getting smacked in the face with all the bugs. :bigthumbsup:
Clone, do you have 'June Bugs" where you live? If not then don't go into areas where they are without a helmet.. at 75mph they bounce off car windshields so hard you can actually chip the glass and then they fly off like nothing happened... Impacting one on your helmet will flip your head around worse than catching a rock upside the head.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
DaltonH said:
Clone, do you have 'June Bugs" where you live? If not then don't go into areas where they are without a helmet.. at 75mph they bounce off car windshields so hard you can actually chip the glass and then they fly off like nothing happened... Impacting one on your helmet will flip your head around worse than catching a rock upside the head.
No June Bugs here...however we have a major love bug problem in Florida. These little suckers swarm by the millions.
Actually I think Florida probably has almost every insect known to man. :eek:

DaltonH, which UK dealer did you email? The one that I provided?

Ric
 
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I would think the ECE rating would be superior, if anything just because they batch test instead of just sending one helmet of a given line for testing and passing. I couldn't find the article I was hoping to find, but here's something from webbikeworld on the standards. ...I just remember a online mag testing helmets and the results finding many cheaper dot only rated helmets performing as well or better than snell rated simply by the more common sense tests conducted. Anywho, here's the stuff from webbikeworld:

When a motorcyclist goes into a shop to buy a helmet and starts reading the stickers and labels on the helmets for sale, he or she is likely to have some questions. This is because in spite of interest and lip service to international harmonization, there are still numerous performance standards for motorcycle helmets.

Some are government standards and others issued by private organizations. These standards differ in many ways but are similar in that they measure a helmet’s ability to absorb impact. The effectiveness of the retention system that keeps the helmet on the head is also tested as are accessories such as face shields.

Equally important, although not directly addressed by helmet standards, are wearability issues such as comfort, ventilation, weight, fit, cost, appearance, and availability. There are two ageless helmet maxims that the reader should be aware of. First is that if you can tell the helmet designers exactly what your crash will be, they can make you the best possible helmet for that particular crash. Second is that the best helmet possible won’t protect you if you’re not wearing it.

Motorcycle helmets are designed, manufactured, and tested to meet performance standards. These performance tests drive the helmet design and the measured performance of the helmets in laboratory testing, and therefore accident performance as well. In spite of the similarity of purpose, the methods and requirements vary dramatically from standard to standard.

Some are relatively simple, and others are far more complex. It is important to note that none of the standards are meant to precisely replicate the threats that a motorcyclist may see in a crash. This is primarily due to the need for reliability and repeatability in the testing environment, to say nothing of the variability of actual crashes.

There have been several studies of motorcycle crashes over the last 25 years that have attempted to evaluate any protective advantage or disadvantage of helmets meeting one standard or another (Hurt, 1981; Otte, 1991). No advantage has ever been shown in these field studies for any particular standard, so the helmet industry and individual riders are left comparing theoretical pros and cons of the various standards.

That is not to say that research has not shown important differences in helmets. Since helmets protect best what they cover most, additional coverage has always been found to provide additional protection: a full-facial coverage helmet has more protection than an open-face which has more coverage and protection than a shorty (partial coverage) helmet.

Research in California (Hurt, et al, 1981) showed that 90% of real life crash impacts are at or below the impact requirements of the U.S. Department of Transportation’s Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard No. 218, performance standard for motorcycle helmets (also known as FMVSS 218 or DOT).

It is critical to note that helmets have been continually shown to be effective in reducing head injury, regardless of what standard they might meet. The only noteworthy exception is the novelty helmet worn in protest of mandatory helmet use laws. These “helmets” do not meet any standard and cannot be expected to provide meaningful head protection.

In the United States, there have historically been two helmet standards applicable to motorcycle helmets. The FMVSS 218 or DOT is the mandatory U.S. government standard that all motorcycle helmets must meet to be legal for sale and use on public roads and highways.

This standard was first issued in 1974 and was updated in 1980 and again in 1988. Much work has been done toward another update in the near future. The second standard is issued by the Snell Memorial Foundation, a private organization that issues its own motorcycle helmet standard.

A third helmet standard from the Economic Community of Europe (ECE) is actually the most commonly used internationally, the ECE 22.05, required by over 50 countries worldwide. While helmet standards all have the goal of regulating helmet performance for protection of riders’ heads, some performance requirements conflict between standards.

A major benefit for U.S. riders is that the ECE 22.05 standard does not directly conflict with the DOT standard. Limited testing shows that ECE qualified helmets will also meet the demands of FMVSS 218. Of course, not all DOT helmets will meet ECE 22.05 because the European standard does require testing at higher velocities than DOT.

Another advantage of the ECE 22.05 standard is the requirement for mandatory batch testing of helmets before they are released to the riding public. What this means to the consumer is the quality of the helmet in meeting the ECE 22.05 standard is assured by a mandatory sample testing of every production of helmets before they leave the factory, not with random testing performed after thousands of helmets with unknown quality are delivered to the dealers.

No one helmet designed to a particular standard or standards can provide the maximum protection in all types of crashes and no helmet can protect the wearer against all foreseeable impacts. Helmets can be designed to provide additional protection, for example, full-face helmets compared to the open-face types, but added protection comes with a weight penalty.

How much weight are you willing to wear? If you reject helmets with less coverage, you will end up with a helmet that covers most of your head and weighs about three pounds. By choosing a helmet meeting a high performance standard such as ECE 22.05, you can minimize that weight while maximizing protection.

Summary

If you’re not comfortable with a helmet that only meets the US Government DOT standard, what do you look for? Historically, American riders have looked for a Snell label but the world is getting smaller and we now have other viable alternatives. The ECE 22.05 standard is used in over 50 European countries, including Germany, a country known for taking a hard line on personal protection.

Helmets certified to the ECE 22.05 standard are approved for competition events by AMA, CCS, FIM, Formula-USA and WERA and are chosen by nearly every professional motorcycle racers competing in world championship road racing, motocross and off road events, including the ultimate sport of Moto GP. Helmets that are certified to both DOT and ECE 22.05 offer the highest level of realistic protection with the added benefit of light weight for day-long comfort and rider performance.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
dynamos2000 thank you for that informative piece. I tried to do my homework before I bought this helmet. Contrary to what EAGLEFAN67 stated above, I believe that this helmet is as safe if not safer than most American made helmets. By the way I don't know what ACU GOLD approved is but I do know that this helmet is ECE-2205 APPROVED.

This is from their website under "safety & technology":

http://www.caberg-helm.com/home.aspx?xL=e&xM=azienda&xSM=safety+&+technology&xP=&xPC=

Ric
 

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toneout said:
Aren't Snell and DOT both US Ratings? These helmets are from Europe. I am sure their ratings are different. I know Snell considers flip up helmets the same as open face and my understanding is you can't get a Snell rating on an open face.
Not true. I have an open face Aria that is Snell approved.
 

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Lamont may be giving me more credit than I deserve in the helmet knowledge area.

It is true that no retractable/removable chin protection type helmet has ever been Snell approved. From what I've read, no helmet of this type has ever been submitted for testing. Manufacturers know the requirements and actually do their own testing before submitting a helmet. No one wants to have a helmet FAIL a safety certification process.

The reason a retractable/removable chin guard helmet will not pass Snell includes the fact that Snell cannot guarantee the chin guard will be in place at all times, not necessarily that the helmet (in proper configuration) will not pass.

I sell motorcycle helmets and helmet repair parts, mostly Arai, on eBay. I've been doing this for about 5 years. About 1/3 of my customers are in Europe or the UK. With the dollar getting ever weaker against the British Pound and the Euro, my International business continues to grow.

I have done a lot of research on helmet construction, materials and safety ratings. This is because I'm always getting questions about helmet types and the differences between DOT/Snell and other International safety standards. Here is what I've found.

Originally, Snell was developed for auto racing. One of the major factors in the Snell criteria is the helmet shells ability to resist penetration. Statistics show auto racers are likely to encounter contact with hard and possibly sharp objects in a crash.

This is great if you're in a race car, but not necessarily good for a motorcycle rider. Research shows helmet penetration is rare in a motorcycle accident. This is significant because there is a trade off between penetration resistance and G-Force transferred to the head. I'm sure everyone knows that G-Force is simply the rate at which an object is accelerated or decelerated.

The brain is a fragile item, handle with care. G-Force is the single most important factor producing head injury in a motorcycle accident. Snell rated helmets actually transfer a significantly higher G-Force to the head than Non-Snell rated helmets. This is a fact that is well documented. The only debate is whether the increased penetration resistance is worth the additional G-Force energy it creates.

In addition, helmets that pass the Snell rating tend to be heavier. The stuff needed to resist penetration is much heavier than the material used to reduce G-Force.

So what about European/UK safety ratings? Europe and the UK are much more motorcycle specific with their safety standards. They have taken the hard research data and realized that a motorcycle rider is safer with the most G-Force resistant helmet they can get. There is still a shell penetration component in the International ratings but it is not predominant as with Snell.

Bottom line, in my opinion, the European/UK ratings deliver a better, safer helmet for a motorcycle rider than do the Snell ratings.

To Snell's credit they have begun to make some changes in their rating process to be more motorcycle specific. But from everything I have read there is still an over emphasis on shell penetration to the detriment of G-Force reduction.

How about DOT rated helmets. Excluding the 1/2 helmets which don't cover enough of the head to really give much protection, most DOT helmets have a better G-Force rating than do much more expensive Snell rated helmets. Since Flip-Front and 3/4 helmets can't qualify for Snell anyway, they are free to incorporate the weight savings and improved G-Force aspects.

Arai, Shoei and other high end helmet makers have been trying to get Snell to re-think their motorcycle safety standards for some time now. They don't like the fact that their very expensive Snell rated helmets are not able to afford the level of G-Force reduction that some much less expensive helmets do.

One last thing. The best helmet in the world will not give you much protection if it doesn't fit correctly. Arai did some research several years ago and found the about 70% of non-professional motorcycle riders were wearing a helmet at least 1 size too big for them. I have found this to be very true.

If the helmet is too big it WILL probably come off in an accident. Having been in the fire department for 33 years I can tell you this happens all of the time.

Hope this helps and I didn't bore you.
 
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