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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok, Suzuki talks about a "special tool" to reveal the FI codes in the manual. The "special tool" is $15.99 from Suzuki. In reality it is a single toggle switch with two wire leads and probably a pin insert at each end.

The "special tool" works by using the two leads to connect two jumpers on a wire header with the 109.

I'm cheap and spoke to a local bike shop, P**** T***, and John told me all about the "special tool" when I asked him. I won't put the shop name in because I'm not sure if Suzuki police exist.

Ok, I have a "special tool", only $15.99, see pic below:



Here is the plug which uses the "special tool". Pull the left side cover off by the ECU, and there will be two unused plugs with black boots on them. One of the plugs inside the rubber boot is black and the other is white. Remove the boot from the white plug.

To keep perspective, rotate the white plug so that the plug 'lock' pin is on top. See the highlight in the picture below:



Then on the right side of the plug, you will insert your "special tool" into the top right pin connector hole and the bottom right pin connector hole.



Turn the bike ignition on - there is no need to start the bike. The FI code will display in the odometer box. C##. Look up our FI error code in the manual, or call Suzuki with the number, and then you'll know what's up with the FI.

Now, another tip about the FI code in the odometer box using the "special tool". When you look into the odometer box and see the code, e.g. C46 (EXCVA - exhaust control valve), just to the left of the code will be a hash mark. That represents the position of the throttle open percentage/position. If you then open up your throttle, the hash mark will move up screen to represent the increasing open position of the throttle. If it is moving appropriately, that is supposed to mean that your throttle is working ok.

That's it. That's all I know about this. Enjoy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
tom_C said:
Jeff, would you post a close-up, detailed pic of a connector showing which hole is the "lock" and the place where the wires actually connect. I tried and tried to get the #7 black with brown stripe wire (SET wire) out of the connector but couldn't get it to budge. I tried both the small hole and the larger hole at #7. I must be doing it wrong.

I know, I'm kind of slow but if you would just show me I can save having to cut my wiring harness which I really don't want to do. Thanks!
Tom,

Go back to the How to. "I tried and tried to get the #7 black with brown stripe wire (SET wire) out of the connector but couldn't get it to budge"

The connector in this How To is not on the ECU. Do not mess with the ECU to do this code check with the "special tool". Do not mess with the ECU to do this code check with the "special tool". Do not mess with the ECU to do this code check with the "special tool".

This connector is not on the ECU.

Read the instructions carefully, and follow step - by - step. "there will be two unused plugs with black boots on them. One of the plugs inside the rubber boot is black and the other is white. Remove the boot from the white plug."

Take a look at the pic with the yellow circle on it, in the first post. The push to disconnect connector is positioned at the top of the picture, and that provides the orientation that I held the connector, and once you have the connector in that position, push in connector on top, then the two right holes, circled in red, are where you insert your "special" tool.

Here is an enlarged pic.



Again, notice the orientation of the push pin connector, on the top of the white plug.

One of the things someone can do, if they need a larger blow-up, is save the pic to their computer, and enlarge it.

Follow the steps, one by one, and do not skip any step. You will get there and it will work for you. Once you do it, it will be in your repertoire forever.

Hope this helps.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
1 wheel peel said:
I had to disassemble the plug itself then be very careful not to pull any other wires out, then reassemble the plug end & connect the harness back. :bigthumbsup: Hope this helps.

later D
1 wheel,

I am not sure what you mean by "disassemble the plug itself". The plug I am talking about only has a black rubber boot on it that needs to be pulled off. The rubber boot is only for weather protection. It is not a plug that plugs into the ECU and it is not used for any SET wire conversion, like Tom seems headed.

Maybe you are thinking of the plug in to the ECU, which is not this plug for this How To.

I am emphasizing this because Tom seemed to be off into referencing the ECU plug for the SET wire mod, and this is not the ECU connector at all. I know you understand that, but at this point I am not sure Tom understands that. I don't want him to damage anything because he confuses something.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Tom,

If you are not sure how to do this, leave it alone. You do not want to plug in the "special tool" into any connector, if it is the wrong connector.

If you still have difficulty with this, give me your phone number and I will call you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Tom,

I hope you are just trying to be funny.

No, do not use the plug on the ECU. Use the white plug that I put into the blown up picture.

Here it is again.

 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
tom_C said:
Just messing with you Jeff. Thanks for the info!
Thank god, I was starting to feel I was back working with patients, again! :joke:

Good luck. Let is know what it says.
 

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The only problem with your version .. you normally shut off your bike to insert that sucker, you then have lost the code in most cases.

Its nice to have a connected unit with a switch that you can reach w/o turning the motor off.

Yes, JDMS-2 is the same thing... been making those for 6-7 years now.

Do becareful on the jumpers, the wrong one (pins) will resuslt in a very expensive ECU lesson.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
jeffw said:
The only problem with your version .. you normally shut off your bike to insert that sucker, you then have lost the code in most cases.

Its nice to have a connected unit with a switch that you can reach w/o turning the motor off.

Yes, JDMS-2 is the same thing... been making those for 6-7 years now.

Do becareful on the jumpers, the wrong one (pins) will resuslt in a very expensive ECU lesson.
Jeff W:

I don't know about losing codes, but what it did for me was when my system was throwing an Fi, which accompanied turing on the bike/ignition system, I could just have the short in the system, turn the key on, and the code would present itself.

I suspect, but don't know from practical experience, that if you bike was throwing a code after riding a bit, you'd just need to have the jumper in place while you ride.

I also don't know if it throws multiple Fi's, if you can cycle through those, since I did not have multiple codes, but the Suzu mechanic said you just press the dash buttons to cycle through multiple codes, as well as TP, etc.

You were a Suzu mechanice once? Is this information correct?
 

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Jeff W:

I don't know about losing codes, but what it did for me was when my system was throwing an Fi, which accompanied turing on the bike/ignition system, I could just have the short in the system, turn the key on, and the code would present itself.

I suspect, but don't know from practical experience, that if you bike was throwing a code after riding a bit, you'd just need to have the jumper in place while you ride.

I also don't know if it throws multiple Fi's, if you can cycle through those, since I did not have multiple codes, but the Suzu mechanic said you just press the dash buttons to cycle through multiple codes, as well as TP, etc.

You were a Suzu mechanice once? Is this information correct?
The codes will only be erased if the ECM loses connection to the wiring harness.

When you get multiple codes the LCD will cycle through the list of codes continuously at about 1 per second.
 

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:eek:Thanks and I'll let you know what I get. Terry M.
Ok, Suzuki talks about a "special tool" to reveal the FI codes in the manual. The "special tool" is $15.99 from Suzuki. In reality it is a single toggle switch with two wire leads and probably a pin insert at each end.

The "special tool" works by using the two leads to connect two jumpers on a wire header with the 109.

I'm cheap and spoke to a local bike shop, P**** T***, and John told me all about the "special tool" when I asked him. I won't put the shop name in because I'm not sure if Suzuki police exist.

Ok, I have a "special tool", only $15.99, see pic below:



Here is the plug which uses the "special tool". Pull the left side cover off by the ECU, and there will be two unused plugs with black boots on them. One of the plugs inside the rubber boot is black and the other is white. Remove the boot from the white plug.

To keep perspective, rotate the white plug so that the plug 'lock' pin is on top. See the highlight in the picture below:



Then on the right side of the plug, you will insert your "special tool" into the top right pin connector hole and the bottom right pin connector hole.



Turn the bike ignition on - there is no need to start the bike. The FI code will display in the odometer box. C##. Look up our FI error code in the manual, or call Suzuki with the number, and then you'll know what's up with the FI.

Now, another tip about the FI code in the odometer box using the "special tool". When you look into the odometer box and see the code, e.g. C46 (EXCVA - exhaust control valve), just to the left of the code will be a hash mark. That represents the position of the throttle open percentage/position. If you then open up your throttle, the hash mark will move up screen to represent the increasing open position of the throttle. If it is moving appropriately, that is supposed to mean that your throttle is working ok.

That's it. That's all I know about this. Enjoy.
 

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special tool

Your special tool worked well, except yours had and racing stripe and mine did not. lol. Got a code C28 and the tps appears to be working fine; when I moved my throttle, so did the dash move. Now what does c28 mean in layman's terms? Maybe one day they will make an onboard computer that would say what the problem is, like "Hay jackass, change your oil n plugs" , lol. :joke:
 

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No I do not. Also, the normal pressure up and squeak sound you hear at the key turn appears to have lengthened a bit and sounds slightly different. Almost like a printer printing really fast. Last about 5 secs.
 

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This is the point where the dyno jet was hooked into on the tps. Is it possible that the code is just recognizing the accessory as foreign? It appears to run fine, but gotta go run it for sure to make certain. It was raining all weekend and this morning and haven't had a chance to ride it except around the corner. I just completed it sunday afternoon.
 

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okay, I pulled the tank and air cleaners off and tested continuity and resistance. All like its supposed to be. Will this code clear itself once the "problem" is no longer evident, once I start and run the bike, or do I need a "special tool" to do that once it has run?. Also, when you first turn the key and you hear the "squeak", that vibrating noise I told you I heard is from the throttle body butterfly plate(?) fluctuating back and forth rapidly like maybe the system is self testing or priming. Is that normal?
 

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Also, my left air intake box was not connected to the air tube leading to the throttle body (oops) on the front cylinder. Could that have made the code or even a difference?:dontknow:
 

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At last, at last, satisfaction at last. Went for a ride. Came back to code still lit, so I cycled the ignition switch on and off about 3x's rapidly (worked on my 03' chevy avalanche) and the code disappeared!!!!!! checked it over and over and rode it around the block, no code. Even the throttle body flutter stopped upon first turning the key. Now all you here is the inevitable squeak of the fuel pump pressuring up and then ECSTASY WHEN YOU HERE THAT ENGINE CRANK!!!!! And no code!!!!!!! Thanks for your help Papa. :2excited::hot::bow::beer3::yourock:
 
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