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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So...anyone that messes with e-bay, know about these a#%holes that send you these bogus e-mails trying to get you to log in so they can capture and use your info. I thought I was a pro at detecting these until this morning!! I get a E-mail....the topic is"Question from e-bay member".....sender="e-bay member". I sell a lot on e-bay so thought nothing of it!! I open it and read the message that reads,"HI! Do you still have this item for sale?? I'm online right now and can pay right away!!". So...I start thinking what item did I list that didnt sell in recent weeks?? So....I clicked the link to bring me to the item. Let me tell you....this e-mail that I got was IDENTICAL to the page you would get from a "real" e-bay member.....except for one thing that I overlooked. When someone mails you about a item you are selling, there WILL be a URL to the item, but there is also a description of the item that was missing!! So...me being half asleep....I clicked the link and was linked to the e-bay log in page. I logged in....and as soon as I did my stomach dropped!! I suddenly realized that clicking that link should have brought me right to the item!! Instead it brought me to a very old listing of some Chevy heads that were for sale. They got me!!! :swear: I instantly closed my email and logged into e-bay, and Pay-Pal, and changed my passwords!! I also did the norm....forwarded the email to [email protected] . I feel sooo stupid!! :redfaced: Hope nothing bad comes of this!! It looked so legit guys!! So....just a heads up....if you get a member email from e-bay....always check the address it is comming from before you click ANYTHING!! It should come from this address: [email protected] . Dodt fall for this BULLSH$T!!-HELL :evil:Â
 
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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
It is getting worse and worse. I had someone nab my credit card numbers somehow and charge up over 2k the other night. I got a call from my credit card company asking if I made all these charges. Fortunately, i am not responsible for the charges. Got something similar from Paypal last weekend that looked exactly like Paypal telling me that there was some suspiscious activity involving my account and I should change my password right away. When i went to change my password, it also asked my to verify my credit card info and asked for my PIN #. As soon as i saw that, I knew something was up. Keep in mind. The Paypal logo is all over this e-mail, the links are all looking legit, etc etc. I reported it right away and sure enough it was a skam.

You really have to watch your back on the net anymore. Thank goodness we are safe here :p Now would everyone please just pm me with your PIN numbers and I will keep them on file for you. Trust me........................... :joke: :joke:
 

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Any time I see any email from anyone that I don't know (and that includes my bank, e-bay, etc.) I immediately close my email and then close the browser I was using. Then I either call the bank/e-bay or log into my account by re-opening a different browser (I use both Explorer and Netscape just because of people attempting to get my account info). URLs can appear to be normal (like from e-bay) but the hacker can hide a different URL behind the one you see. It's also best to type in the URL yourself. That way you know exactly where your going.
 

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The best way to detect these as phishing scams is to always look at the url of the link they want you to click. It will not be the URL you would expect to see. The way they make it even more realistic is by making all other links on the page true links. Just the Click Here to login link will be the one that takes you to their site. Most browsers will show the URL of the link without needing to click on it... Just hover your mouse over it to see. Here's an example.

This was obviously a fake because I have no business with this company, but still this is what I mean.

To update your Federal Credit Union® records click on the following link:
http://www.ncua.gov/account_problems/

That's what the link was written as, but when you hovered over the link, it showed up as

http://125.99.121.101/.web/login.php

That's an obvious giveaway. All Phishing emails will be identifiable by the URL they actually use.

I looked farther in my junk folder and found one from "Ebay". It's not as official looking as others I've seen, but this gives you another idea.

This is an excerpt

As a result, your access to bid or buy on eBay has been restricted. To start using fully your eBay account, please update and verify your information by responding this notification.

"Button that says Respond to This Notification"

If you do not respond by July 17 2006 your account may be suspended for security reasons.

Note: If this is the second time you receiving this notice, it might be because you have made a mistake when you entered your details or the account was not updated.

Well, when I hovered the mouse over the button, this was the url.

http://216-23-218-210galvestonbay.net:81/ebay.com/index.php?MfcISAPICommand=SignInFPP

That's pretty obvious to me that it's fake.

Here's a bogus URL from a PayPal email I got. If this one doesn't scream fake I don't know what does.

http://kgrr-clan.de/docs/vwar/backup/. /www.paypal.com/index.htm
 

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i tryed to buy something in 2001,(a gift for my wife) i went to the url , and four days later i owed $55000.00 it took me 36 weeks to clean this up . BE VERY AWERE !!!!!
 

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Medic1210 said:
To start using fully your eBay account, please update and verify your information by responding this notification.
Either you typed it wrong, or the poor use of english grammar would have been the first red flag I notice. Most of them can't speak proper English.

I once got an email from a company in China wanting me to buy their products. Their email said "If you are interesting please reply to this email". So of course I responded "I'm sorry but I'm not very interesting". :a20:
Sometimes I crack myself up. :D

By the way, I always do the hovering cursor thing you mentioned as well. Once an IT guy always an IT guy I guess. ;) :doorag:
 

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Excellent catch. As someone else mentioned, eBay isn't the only target of these scammers. It's pretty much any company that has a large online presence, and that the scammers feel they can make some money by getting your login info or getting your credit card info.

The login ones, like you had, will give them your password. They will then often set up listings on eBay where they will scam other eBay members in your name.

The good thing is the vast majority of these scams are caught and taken down long before they ever get anyone.

The best way to avoid this stuff is educate yourself. Learn what the scams are and how they work. Any email that states it is from eBay or your bank, and asks for your sign-in information or financial information, avoid it.

A while back eBay rolled out a new site feature that can really help you avoid this if you are aware of it. If you go to your My eBay page, there is a link on the left side that says 'My Messages'. Click on this to go to your messages on eBay. Any messages that are directly from eBay will appear in this page, and will be highlighted in blue. If you get an email in your regular email, and it's not in My Messages, it's not from eBay. Any messages sent from one member to another will also be there, and will include information on recognizing and avoiding scams.

eBay also has a whole section of their site dedicated to educating people to internet scams. Look in the help section for something called the 'Security Center'.

For those afraid to purchase items on eBay, for fear of scams and fraud, just use the same precautions you would use buying something on the street (classified ads, etc). If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is. Learn all you can about the seller before investing much money. Learn about what you are doing before you start bidding on stuff or buying stuff. You wouldn't tear into the engine on your 109 without knowing exactly what you are doing. Take the same approach to buying items online. Learn exactly what you are doing before you dig into it.

I have had over 100 successful transactions on eBay and the only one that was remotely bad was a buyer didn't pay for a $30 item. I reported it, got some of the fees back, relisted the item for free, and the buyer was suspended. I bought the exhaust for my Volusia on eBay, and it was perfect. I even spent $1000 on a digital SLR camera and absolutely love the thing. One of my best transactions, saved about $500 from retail (bought from a retailer selling on eBay).

Learn what you are doing, do your homework, be a bit wary, and you will be fine.

Contrary to a previous opinion, I love eBay. It appears Direct Line likes it too as they are the current high bidder on the wrecked 109. (Good luck!)
 

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M109R Fan said:
It could still come from that addres (or show it comes form that address) and be coming from somewhere else... :verymad:
Excellent point.....most of these scammers that have any idea what they are doing know how to forge the headers on an email to make it appear as if it is coming from an @ebay email address. They do the same thing with the bank scams (e.g. @wellsfargo.com). Don't trust it solely because it comes from what appears to be a valid corporate email address. For eBay stuff, check your 'My Messages'. Also, anything eBay would send you (other than a change of email address confirmation generated by YOU) can easily be accessed or completed by going to your already saved eBay links and clicking through the site. You should never have to click on a link in your regular email then sign in.
Again, trading through eBay can be lucrative or save you a lot of money as long as you are cautious and take your time.
 
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