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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Getting cold in NH and my hands have been the coldest part of my riding in the morning so I bought National Cycle N5503 Clear Hand Deflectors. 5 minute install and they look pretty sharp. Have to try them out this weekend and see if they make the difference I think they will in hand comfort.

Rich
 

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I've been using for a year now and they don't seem to do much as far as protection my hands in cold or rain.

I'm sure they make SOME difference, just don't seem to make a big one.

Good luck!
 

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I've been using for a year now and they don't seem to do much as far as protection my hands in cold or rain.

I'm sure they make SOME difference, just don't seem to make a big one.

Good luck!
I do agree that they make some difference.
I find that they help in a light rain. I can leave my regular gloves on and my hands don't get wet until I keep riding a long ways.

In the cold there seems to be enough wind that my hands get cold after a while. Just seems to delay it for a while.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Went for a ride this morning in the 30"s. The deflectors are better than hands exposed to the wind. With my snowmobile gloves it is tolerable. I can see that they would be helpful inn a light rain.
Rich
 

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The Tourmaster heated gloves are a nice addition, especially if you ride all year round
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the feedback Don. Heated gloves are a different direction than how I would work on the problem from my snowmobile experience, which is heated handlebar inserts.I am relatively new to motorcycles but I have been snowmobiling since the early 70's. Is the cabling for the gloves annoying? If I had a nickel for every time I've stepped off my snowmobile forgetting to unhook my heated helmet visor I could buy myself a decent meal, lol. Does anyone have feedback on using heated handlebar inserts? Poly Heaters carry handlebar inserts for motorcycles that will definitely fit inside a 1" handlebar but a potential issue I see is getting the heat transferred thru the throttle grip since there is a gap to allow grip to twist with the throttle. The clutch side should be the same as a snowmobile from a heat transfer standpoint. The heaters are not that expensive (~$35), they draw 18 watts and the decorative panel in front of the tank looks like it might make a good location to mount the switch.

Rich
 

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I ran heated grips on my first bike and they are helpful,b ut not enough for me , however i guess it all depends on what kind of riding your doing. My commute is pretty much all highway speeds and after about 20 -25 minutes the wind had found a way to suck the heat outta the outside and top of my hands even though the inside was toasty even hot.

My Gerbings heated gloves are much better then the grips were. IF i was doing around town or backroad riding the grips would be be sufficient i think ,but not at on the superslab for any period of time

for my wires to the gloves they are fished inside the jacket between the outer shell and the liner, temptroller on my left hip when i need it and plugged into the bike with a plug that hangs out under the front left of my rider seat , no issues with them

Thanks for the feedback Don. Heated gloves are a different direction than how I would work on the problem from my snowmobile experience, which is heated handlebar inserts.I am relatively new to motorcycles but I have been snowmobiling since the early 70's. Is the cabling for the gloves annoying? If I had a nickel for every time I've stepped off my snowmobile forgetting to unhook my heated helmet visor I could buy myself a decent meal, lol. Does anyone have feedback on using heated handlebar inserts? Poly Heaters carry handlebar inserts for motorcycles that will definitely fit inside a 1" handlebar but a potential issue I see is getting the heat transferred thru the throttle grip since there is a gap to allow grip to twist with the throttle. The clutch side should be the same as a snowmobile from a heat transfer standpoint. The heaters are not that expensive (~$35), they draw 18 watts and the decorative panel in front of the tank looks like it might make a good location to mount the switch.

Rich
 

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ahhh i forgot , had hand deflectors on my last bike and i liked them, you do still get plenty of air on your hands ,but, its not that direct heat sucking wind you experience without them. Not sure i am gonna order them again for the C though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks for the link. There is a photobucket album link on either page 2 or 3 of the post that still shows the step by step photos of the modification.

Rich
 

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I have the deflectors on my M109. I couldn't find any gloves to keep my hands warm enough in the winter. The deflectors took the edge off enough to make winter riding bearable again.

-Josh
 

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Covers.

http://www.discountramps.com/atv-handlebar-mitts.htm

I use at set like this that fit over my deflectors and I can ride with just a small set of gloves on. I ride 45 minutes to an hour on the highway and have no problems.

I put them over the deflectors because the speed pushes the covers onto the clutch and brake lever otherwise.

You can slide your hand in and out without a problem.

I have a Moose brand set but couldn't find them any longer.

I ride until the snow flies. Then, again when it stops.:D
 

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I've seen those used and they seem very comfortable.
I've gone through pair after pair of gloves looking for something that wasn't too bulky, but was warm enough.
We do the same, ride 12 months, as long as the roads are clear and the weather's above 32c
 
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