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This is Part 3 of a 3-part How-To post:

Check clearances: Turn the bars full left and right to ensure adequate clearance at the master cylinder. WARNING! When you turn the bars to the right, do it s-l-o-w-l-y! If you have rotated the bars down from the stock position, the double banjo bolt under the master cylinder will most likely scratch and dent your tank and speedometer bezel! :realmad: If your bars are in the stock position or rotated up you should have no problems. Turn the bars left and right again, this time checking for binding between the forks. If you have a hydraulic jack, jack your bike up until the front wheel no longer contacts the ground. Turn the bars left and right and check for proper brake line length. Feeling the lines about eight inches up from the caliper, the lines should be slightly loose to snug, not taut. If you jacked the bike, drop it back down on the side stand.

Tighten the banjo bolts: If clearances checked out ok, turn the bars full to the left. Hold the top brake line end tight against the casting stop under the master cylinder while also holding the bottom line end parallel to the upper line end. Now tighten the double banjo bolt under the master cylinder. Torque the double banjo bolt to 20 ft. lbs (this is the correct torque setting for steel male bolts and ends to female aluminum per Goodridge). If you do not have a torque wrench I cannot really describe what 20 ft. lbs. feels like. For what it’s worth, Aprilia (Italian 2-stroke roadracing bikes) shop manuals describe all torque settings as “good and tight”. Go figure. ::)




Now tighten the lower banjo bolts at the caliper. Make sure the line ends are snug against the casting stops on the calipers. Torque the lower bolts to 20 ft. lbs.

Secure cables and lines: Remember that rubber o-ring that held the right control cables to the right brake line? Wrap the o-ring around the cables and right brake line and secure with a small tie wrap. Leave the tie wrap loose with a gap so the lines can flex and slip.


Take a pair of pliers and close the wire guides and bracket guides slightly. Do not cinch tight against the brake lines. Close them only slightly to ensure that the brake lines do not escape the guides.


Bleed the front brakes:
This how-to is not intended to elaborate on brake bleeding techniques. There are many ways to bleed brakes. Nutshell version using a Mityvac: Keep in mind that the purpose of bleeding is to replace the air in the braking system with brake fluid. That said, DO NOT shake your bottles of brake fluid! Open a sealed bottle of DOT4 brake fluid and fill the master cylinder reservoir to the full line.


Before you start bleeding at the caliper, make sure the fluid in your reservoir is bubble-free. Draw fluid to the master cylinder piston by s-l-o-w-l-y squeezing the front brake lever a few times.


Remove the bleeder screw cap from the caliper of your choice. Place an 8mm 6-point box-end wrench over the bleeder screw. Place the Mityvac suction tube over the end of the bleeder screw. Pump the Mityvac until you have created as much vacuum as possible. Slowly open the bleeder screw. When you are about out of vacuum, close the bleeder screw. Keep a close watch on the brake fluid level in master cylinder reservoir at all times. If less than 1/4 full (bottom of sight glass), add brake fluid to the reservoir. If you run the reservoir dry at any time, you will have to start this whole process all over. Also keep an eye on the fluid level in the Mityvac reservoir. When the Mityvac reservoir is about 2/3 full, close the bleeder screw and discard the brake fluid in the Mityvac reservoir. Do not return this fluid to the master cylinder reservoir! Pump the Mityvac until you have created as much vacuum as possible. Open the bleeder screw. When you are about out of vacuum, close the bleeder screw. Repeat until you are drawing fluid with no air. Pump the Mityvac until you have created as much vacuum as possible. Slowly pull the suction tube off the bleeder screw. Move to other caliper and repeat the bleeding procedure until you are drawing fluid with no air. Slowly squeeze the front brake lever 10-20 times. Repeat the entire bleeding procedure again, once for each caliper (or 3-4 times if you are anal about your brakes, like I am).

Fill the brake reservoir with brake fluid up to the full line.


Install the black rubber diaphragm.


Install the white plastic diaphragm plate.


Install the master cylinder cap and tighten the two Phillips head screws.


Install front fairing (headlight nacelle):
Reverse the procedure for removing the front fairing. Make sure you seat the headlight plug well. Make sure the push pins “pop” into place (flush) when you push the center pins. Make sure the big, ugly, black plastic rear cover is fully seated in the back of the front fairing.

Test front brakes:
Practice your emergency stopping in a vacant parking lot or on a deserted back road. If your brakes feel squishy, bleed them again. Admire your handiwork. :beer3:



Then, go for a ride, preferably on twisty mountain roads. :bigthumbsup:


...end part 3 of 3.
 

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Re: Goodridge braided stainless steel front brake lines Part 3 of 3 (dial-up bew

Another nice how to!! Great job with pics and docs :doorag:
 

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Re: Goodridge braided stainless steel front brake lines Part 3 of 3 (dial-up bew

Just finished your 3-Parter That was a great How To. Pictures were in focus and clear and you covered everything in a logical manner. I have done the brakes on a Supra and with this information I will certainly do my 109. Thanks again I was waiting for this one. :bigthumbsup: :bigthumbsup: :super: :2cool: :a18:
 

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Re: Goodridge braided stainless steel front brake lines Part 3 of 3 (dial-up bew

Glad I could help! Been feeling like I've been doing all taking and no giving on this board. There's just so much great info here thanks to everyone. :)
 

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lookes on there sitre cant find that part number for the lines can you help me out Great job cant wait to do mine.
 

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Re: Goodridge braided stainless steel front brake lines Part 3 of 3 (dial-up bew

appreciate all the effort you put into this very good tutorial. i've never done anything mechanical on vehicles before in my life, but i'm diving into it on my bike with the help of good folks like yourself. i just ordered the brake lines from directline.
 

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Re: Goodridge braided stainless steel front brake lines Part 3 of 3 (dial-up bew

just got around to installing them. couldn't have done it without your great tutorial. i used a mityvac, and it ended up not being difficult at all. i see what ya mean about being anal...i must have bled each one 5 times to make sure it was done right. can't half-ass the ole brakes, especially the front ones.
 

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Re: Goodridge braided stainless steel front brake lines Part 3 of 3 (dial-up bew

:clap2: :clap2: :clap2: :clap2: :clap2: :clap2: :clap2: :clap2: :clap2: :clap2: :clap2: :clap2: :clap2: :clap2: :clap2: :clap2: :clap2: :clap2: :clap2:

That has to be one of the best "how to's" I've ever seen. Awesome job!!! :bigthumbsup: :bigthumbsup: :bigthumbsup: :bigthumbsup:
 

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Re: Goodridge braided stainless steel front brake lines Part 3 of 3 (dial-up bew

Hey Seapup, I just checked in the service manual, and the recommended torque setting for the banjo bolts, or brake hose union bolt as they call it, is 16.5ft/lbs (23N-m or 2.3kgf-m). Not sure if it really makes a difference, but just figured I would post it for clarification. :bigthumbsup:
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Re: Goodridge braided stainless steel front brake lines Part 3 of 3 (dial-up bew

Medic1210 said:
Hey Seapup, I just checked in the service manual, and the recommended torque setting for the banjo bolts, or brake hose union bolt as they call it, is 16.5ft/lbs (23N-m or 2.3kgf-m). Not sure if it really makes a difference, but just figured I would post it for clarification. :bigthumbsup:
Hey, I understand your hesitation. :D Good to see you double checking where TQ settings are concerned. :bigthumbsup: Just make sure you use the ft/lb scale not the Nm scale (I've made that mistake before). :eek:

Goodridge listed the following at the time of my writing:
9 ft/lb for aluminum banjo bolts to aluminum caliper or master cylinder using copper washers.
20 ft/lb for steel (chrome, zinc plated or stainless) banjo bolts to aluminum caliper or master cylinder using copper washers.

Now they list:
6-12 ft/lb for aluminum banjo bolts to aluminum caliper or master cylinder using copper washers.
14-24 ft/lb for steel (chrome, zinc plated or stainless) banjo bolts to aluminum caliper or master cylinder using copper washers.

This is the 1st time I've used steel banjo bolts (use aluminum in my race bikes). I just went with 20 ft/lb per Goodridge. I'm sure 16.5 ft/lb is sufficient. :bigthumbsup:
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Re: Goodridge braided stainless steel front brake lines Part 3 of 3 (dial-up bew

bodqua7 said:
Great job on your how to!!!!!!!
Thanks man! Looks like I missed all the other props above. Sorry guys! I appreciate it! :D
 

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Re: Goodridge braided stainless steel front brake lines Part 3 of 3 (dial-up bew

I did it! I installed my Goodridge stainless brake lines this afternoon. :D I would have never tackled this project had it not been for this awesome How-To. I've never messed with brakes of any kind ever in my life. I used a pump vac loaner from Advance Auto Parts, which didn't work all that well. The tubing that came with it was 1/4" I.D. tubing, and didn't create enough seal to create vacuum. I had to run to lowes to pick up a couple feet of 3/16" I.D. tubing. It worked better, but the vacuum basically sucked, and not in the way a vacuum is supposed to. I never could get much vacuum pressure (it had a gague), as air would leak around the bleeder screw. If I was using the vacuum to draw out fluid, I never quit seeing bubbles. I think it was air leaking around the tube. I bled almost a full container of brake fluid. I ended up just doing it the "old fashioned" way. I left the vac tube and canister attached and just pumped the handle until it was good and firm, held it, and with my free hand, unscrewed the bleed screw. When doing it this way, I got no bubbles (this was after doing it several times with the vac BTW). I was even able to do this on the left side. I would pump the handle good and firm, and then walk around to the left side and grab a handful of lever with my right hand while I reached down with my left and bled the line. I haven't had a chance to go riding, as I finished up after dark and had my girls at home with me by myself. I did a quick spin down the street, and the brakes seem very firm. :bigthumbsup: Man that headlight nacelle was a PITA to put back on. Thanks for the excellent instructional Seapup. :bigthumbsup: :yourock:
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Re: Goodridge braided stainless steel front brake lines Part 3 of 3 (dial-up bew

Medic1210 said:
........If I was using the vacuum to draw out fluid, I never quit seeing bubbles. I think it was air leaking around the tube. I bled almost a full container of brake fluid...........
Been there, done that.
I was trying to bleed the brakes on my Kaw and the hose didn't fit the bleeder screw very well. Endless bubbles. I was thinking, man, I'm sure glad I took the time to bleed these brakes! After going through almost 2 bottles of fluid, I started laughing myself silly when I figured out the air wasn't coming from the brake lines. :a20:

Wow! I thought I had long arms with a 36" sleeve length. :eek: Now you're going to make me go to the garage and see if I can reach the brake lever and the left caliper at the same time. BRB...

Interesting... the reach from the lever to the left caliper isn't as far as I thought! :bigthumbsup:

Cool to see another member getting this mod done! :clap2: :beer2: Take a good ride, post some pix and tell us what you think. :a18:
 

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Re: Goodridge braided stainless steel front brake lines Part 3 of 3 (dial-up bew

seapup said:
Been there, done that.
I was trying to bleed the brakes on my Kaw and the hose didn't fit the bleeder screw very well. Endless bubbles. I was thinking, man, I'm sure glad I took the time to bleed these brakes! After going through almost 2 bottles of fluid, I started laughing myself silly when I figured out the air wasn't coming from the brake lines. :a20:

Wow! I thought I had long arms with a 36" sleeve length. :eek: Now you're going to make me go to the garage and see if I can reach the brake lever and the left caliper at the same time. BRB...

Interesting... the reach from the lever to the left caliper isn't as far as I thought! :bigthumbsup:

Cool to see another member getting this mod done! :clap2: :beer2: Take a good ride, post some pix and tell us what you think. :a18:
Yeah I'll be attempting this soon also. I have the set of Goodridge lines (the tri set) but right now I have nothing to attach them to at either end. The master cylinder is getting chromed by The Polisher, and the brake calipers are getting chromed by another shop, and my wheels are getting chromed by a 3rd shop. I like to spread the wealth. I also have no triple trees or forks, so I can't attach the calipers or bars to anything either. -sigh-
Oh well, hopefully in a month it will all be back together, better than ever! :D :doorag:
 

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Re: Goodridge braided stainless steel front brake lines Part 3 of 3 (dial-up bew

seapup said:
Cool to see another member getting this mod done! :clap2: :beer2: Take a good ride, post some pix and tell us what you think. :a18:
I'll go for a good ride today for sure. Oh, I forgot to mention... the black rubber o-ring with the wire tire holding the OEM brake line to the throttle cable was not on my bike. :dontknow: There were also a couple interesting wire tie placements as well. :confused: Another question, acutally more an afterthough, but when bleeding the lines, what's the purpose of building vacuum, opening bleeder, and then closing it back before vacuum is lost? Since I couldn't really build much vacuum (definitely wouldn't hold one), I just opened the bleeder screw and kept pumping the vac handle. It worked, so I'm not sure what the benefit is otherwise. Oh, I also torqued it to 20ft/lbs since I figured the service manual is giving specs for their banjo bolts, not the stainless ones on the Goodridge bolts. Here's a couple quick snaps. Don't look at the dust on the tank. It's been in the garage all night, and I didn't dust it so it looks filthy. :redfaced:



 
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