M109 Rider Forums banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
824 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I don't know if it's just my fat fingers or what but I can't get the fuel line loose. Does anyone have any pics of that connector to help me see how it comes apart?
I did a search but could not find any.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16,261 Posts
No pics, but lift and slide the tank back a few inches, support it w/ a block of wood or similar, reach up under the tank, there are 2 plastic tabs on the connector you need to squeeze together and separate the 2 lines. Very simple.

This link may be of some further help in the future
http://www.m109riders.com/forums/showthread.php?t=126079
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
15,179 Posts
as big b said

squeeze the tabs, they are light blue, i tried the black part, but it doesn't move lol, so squeeze the blue ones and pull

I don't know if it's just my fat fingers or what but I can't get the fuel line loose. Does anyone have any pics of that connector to help me see how it comes apart?
I did a search but could not find any.
 

·
Radio Active Member
Joined
·
27,671 Posts
Push the line all the way in first and then pull the tabs and pull the line off. One side always came off easy and then I started pushing the line all the way on and it seems to work better.
 

·
Radio Active Member
2007 Candy Sonoma Red
Joined
·
22,878 Posts
The blue clip stays on the fuel tank while the black line slides off. Keep that in mind and it's a lot easier.

You can also rotate the line around so it's easier to depress the blue clip.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
824 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the tips, got it off this morning with no problem, still have fat fingers but there is enough room to get 2 hands on this thing. I tried pulling the blue part towards the black, that is how plumbing connectors work, then I tried squeezing the black part, that did not work, now I know the right way and your right, it is easy.
I thought once the tank was off the plugs would be easy to get to. HAH!
But that is not why I removed the tank, I am changing the coolant, who else thinks it's stupid to design a bike where you have to pull the tank to add coolant?
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
15,179 Posts
It's called

Job security for the bike shops, LOL Glad you got it off.

Thanks for the tips, got it off this morning with no problem, still have fat fingers but there is enough room to get 2 hands on this thing. I tried pulling the blue part towards the black, that is how plumbing connectors work, then I tried squeezing the black part, that did not work, now I know the right way and your right, it is easy.
I thought once the tank was off the plugs would be easy to get to. HAH!
But that is not why I removed the tank, I am changing the coolant, who else thinks it's stupid to design a bike where you have to pull the tank to add coolant?
 

·
Radio Active Member
Joined
·
27,671 Posts
Thanks for the tips, got it off this morning with no problem, still have fat fingers but there is enough room to get 2 hands on this thing. I tried pulling the blue part towards the black, that is how plumbing connectors work, then I tried squeezing the black part, that did not work, now I know the right way and your right, it is easy.
I thought once the tank was off the plugs would be easy to get to. HAH!
But that is not why I removed the tank, I am changing the coolant, who else thinks it's stupid to design a bike where you have to pull the tank to add coolant?
You could not put the radiator shroud back on or buy an M90. Then you could change your antifreeze with greater ease. I do not thik it is a big deal. I mean you only have to change it every two years.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
824 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I agree with you when it comes down to changing it every 2 years, but what about when you overheat from maybe a traffic jam or parade and it spews coolant out and you want to add some while on the road? It is not a good idea to make the coolant reservoir unaccessable.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,847 Posts
Finding a place to mount all the goodies that go with liquid-cooling, on a motorcycle has always been difficult. Especially if you do not want it to detract from the appearance of the bike. Nowadays the trend is to have it liquid-cooled, while appearing as if it is air-cooled, aka fake cylinder fins and low-profiile radiators. So the best way to accomplsih this is to hide it underneath something. My wifes M50, the reservoir is under the right engine sidecover and is a real pain to get at.

Incidentally, mine is four years old and I have not had to tinker with the cooling system at all. I know they say every two years, but in my experience with cars and bikes, this is totally unnecessary. My wifes 98 Ford Taurus still had the factory coolant when we traded it in. One of those coolant testers, you know what I am talking about, stick it in and suck some coolant out, and it tells you if it is good or not? Her car had near 200,000 miles on it and the factory coolant was still good. I took it to a Valvoline place in 2008 to get the coolant changed, they tested it and said it was unnecessary.

I can stick one of those testers hoses down inside the reservoir on my 109R, and as long as it shows good, I'll keep-on-keepin-on.

Oh yeah, never had a liquid-cooled anything overheat on me, even with living in the Mojave Desert for 26 years.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
824 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I didn't change mine either, it was good, just low.
Some other stuff I was wondering about. Why change the plugs so often?
I pulled mine, they look great, no wear and burning even. Car plugs are good for 100K, I think this are the good plugs, is it baritium tip? Probably didn't spell that right, but those plugs are made to go a distance. Checked my brake pads, about 50% left after 18,000 miles. I may sound cheap but dollars are hard to come by these days so I don't just replace stuff because someone says to.
I've been working on cars and bikes for 35 years and I have learned to ask questions and then do a little research on your own and make an informed decision. IF someone can give me a valid reason then I am not hard headed. Just frugal.
 

·
Radio Active Member
2007 Candy Sonoma Red
Joined
·
22,878 Posts
If you need to add coolant on the road, or even just for maintenance, there's an easier way.

The vent tube for the coolant reservoir is that black tube hanging down near the oil filter. Fill a squeeze bottle with coolant, stick it in the end of the rubber hose, and squeeze until you get enough coolant in the reservoir. Keep a pan under it to collect what drains back out, or let it suck it back in the bottle.

Can't get much easier than that. :D
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top