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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So do any of u use fuel injector cleaner ???

If so have u tried sea foam....

It is great stuff.... :bigthumbsup:
 

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I love Seafoam for carborators, but on fuel injectors, I tend to use a dedicated FI cleaner rather than Seafoam, which is more of an all-purpose system cleaner.

Be sure to do an oil change after you use seafoam though. It can be a little rough on your oil if any gets past your rings (like in a puke situation)
 

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I use a good dose of Seafoam around every oil change, and in between I use Techron every few tanks.

I used to have problems with it pinging, even running on 93 octane, and had to add a couple ounces of octane boost every other tank. But since changing pipes that seems to have gone away.
 

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Seafoam is good stuff. I've used it in my gas, oil, and intake tract on my other vehicles.

It's supposed to work as a fuel stabilizer as well, which is good for the winter months.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
I love Seafoam for carborators, but on fuel injectors, I tend to use a dedicated FI cleaner rather than Seafoam, which is more of an all-purpose system cleaner.

Be sure to do an oil change after you use seafoam though. It can be a little rough on your oil if any gets past your rings (like in a puke situation)
Do U know u can put sea foam in your oil... ??? Tho I don't in my bike because I keep the oil changed very often .. dose not hurt anything...!!! And why would it go past your rings ??? I use it to clean fuel injectors it works awsome... here is a vido of alot of uses for it... :doorag:

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Do U know u can put sea foam in your oil... ??? Tho I don't in my bike because I keep the oil changed very often .. dose not hurt anything...!!! And why would it go past your rings ??? I use it to clean fuel injectors it works awsome... here is a vido of alot of uses for it... :doorag:

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I know you can put it right in the oil, but that is straight out of the bottle and not having been 'burnt' on the other side of the piston.

How would it get past your rings? Because the fit in there is not perfect and there are plenty of puking bikes (with the correct amount of oil in them) out there to demonstrate that it is happening. Where do you think that extra pressure in the crank case is coming from to cause the puke?

I have used Seafoam in my lawn tractor in the intake. The motor is way old and the rings are a little worn, but it runs well enough to mow the lawn. The oil change after the Seafoam yielded some odd characteristics in the oil I drained out. It was almost like it curdled the crud in the oil into lumps. Perplexed, I ran Seafoam in the oil until the next change and everything was good. One mow before the next change, I used Seafom in the intake again and saw the same curdling as the first time. I concluded that once Seafom is 'burned' in front of the piston, it does not want to be mixed into the oil. Not all that scientific, but enough for me to have my concerns about it on my bike.

Just passing along what I have seen.
 

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I think maybe SR was talking about changing the oil if you use the Seafoam to decarbonize the engine. They do recommend you change it after doing that because you are potentially flushing a lot of abrasive material out of the cylinders, and some of it could get past the rings. But most modern engines burn so clean that decarbonizing really isn't done that much anymore.

I used to do it on my old trucks and cars by pulling a vacuum line off and letting it suck the Seafoam straight from the can into the engine, just to the point that the engine almost stopped running. Once it picked back up you let it suck more in. It would clean a lot of carbon out.
 

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I think maybe SR was talking about changing the oil if you use the Seafoam to decarbonize the engine. They do recommend you change it after doing that because you are potentially flushing a lot of abrasive material out of the cylinders, and some of it could get past the rings. But most modern engines burn so clean that decarbonizing really isn't done that much anymore.

I used to do it on my old trucks and cars by pulling a vacuum line off and letting it suck the Seafoam straight from the can into the engine, just to the point that the engine almost stopped running. Once it picked back up you let it suck more in. It would clean a lot of carbon out.
Reading that it just occurred to me that you can run it in the gas. I used it on the tractor in the intake, so there may have been much higher concentrations than you would expect if you are running it in mixed in your gas.:dontknow:
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Reading that it just occurred to me that you can run it in the gas. I used it on the tractor in the intake, so there may have been much higher concentrations than you would expect if you are running it in mixed in your gas.:dontknow:
Yea I could see that if u poured it directly in the intake it could cause that, all that carbon build up going into the cyclinders all at once.... :bigthumbsup:

Cuz if I had to change my oil everytime I put it in the gas would have to change oil every 400 miles... :D ( I just add a few ounces)
 

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Reading that it just occurred to me that you can run it in the gas. I used it on the tractor in the intake, so there may have been much higher concentrations than you would expect if you are running it in mixed in your gas.:dontknow:
You're 100% correct. When Seafoam first came out a long time ago most folks used it directly in the intake, which led to the warning and common process of changing the oil afterward. But it makes a great general purpose fuel system cleaner by adding a couple ounces to the fuel. I've only added it to the oil a couple times to clean a sticky lifter, which it also does very well.

It also removes water from the fuel and as was stated above, also helps stabilize the fuel during storage.

Short story about how well it can work. A few years ago my Mom and Dad gave us an old motor home that they no longer used. It had been sitting for at least 3 years with old fuel in it. It had a 42 gallon tank that was almost full, so it wouldn't have been easy to drain it. It would barely start and ran very poorly. The fuel smelled more like kerosene than gasoline. I put 3 cans of Seafoam in it and let it run for about 30 minutes before starting the 200 mile trip home. Along the way I stopped at almost every station and topped the tank off with fresh fuel. For about 30 miles it wanted to stop every time you came to a stop sign or light, and being an automatic the only way to keep it running was to treadle the throttle and hold the brake tight, and pray a little. Within 50 miles it had started to perk up and run better, and well before getting it home it was running great. It gets about 10 mpg so topping it off that first few miles didn't dilute the old fuel that much, so most of the improvement came from the Seafoam.
 

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Sometimes you just need to be reminded that a product is more versatile than the way you have come to use it out of habit.:redfaced:

I will tell you that you can perk up your lawn tractor by running in straight in the intake though, but be sure to change the oil afterward.;) Oh, and be sure to do it outside and do not stand down-wind of the exhaust. The blue smoke coming out of that pipe is some nasty poo.

Also, making cold-air intakes for your lawn tractor is easy and worthwhile.:D
 

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I use a good dose of Seafoam around every oil change, and in between I use Techron every few tanks.

I used to have problems with it pinging, even running on 93 octane, and had to add a couple ounces of octane boost every other tank. But since changing pipes that seems to have gone away.
Most of the pumps around here are single hose jobs now, (except for the diesel pump, watch out for the green nozzle!!), and since "everyone" uses the regular, we are putting a hose full of regular in the tank when we fill up. I'm sure that "waters" down the octane rating somewhat. A bit of octane booster every so often sure won't hurt!! :bigthumbsup:
 

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Seafoam every other tank, keeps things nice and clean. I add it to the oil a day before an oil change. I've done this from day one. When I had my valves done at 40,000 the tech told me that the top of the motor looked like new, I'd like to think that the Seafoam helped.
 

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Most of the pumps around here are single hose jobs now, (except for the diesel pump, watch out for the green nozzle!!), and since "everyone" uses the regular, we are putting a hose full of regular in the tank when we fill up. I'm sure that "waters" down the octane rating somewhat. A bit of octane booster every so often sure won't hurt!! :bigthumbsup:
I've fixed that little problem. My wife and I both ride and her bike runs fine on 87 octane. So we fill up at the same time and I fuel hers up first. That way mine gets fresh 93 octane in it every time. :D

And hers seems to run better adding the premium to it too.
 
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