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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I pulled my fuel filter out of the tank to check it since my bike recently took a turn to running like crude.

well the filter was dirty as expected,but, also when i was removing it i did twist a lil bit and the filter portion popped off the elbow :edit: i tried a time or two to put it back on ,so before i fall to useless frustration I am turning to the more knowledgable. will it go back together?

i was hoping to be able to rinse out as best i can and keep at least have it hold til the weather got bitter cold and i wouldn't mind having it parked for a lil while. My dealer doesn't have a filter in stock and word on the street is nobody does and the C filter which is different then the M is on indefinite backorder
 

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I pulled my fuel filter out of the tank to check it since my bike recently took a turn to running like crude.

well the filter was dirty as expected,but, also when i was removing it i did twist a lil bit and the filter portion popped off the elbow :edit: i tried a time or two to put it back on ,so before i fall to useless frustration I am turning to the more knowledgable. will it go back together?

i was hoping to be able to rinse out as best i can and keep at least have it hold til the weather got bitter cold and i wouldn't mind having it parked for a lil while. My dealer doesn't have a filter in stock and word on the street is nobody does and the C filter which is different then the M is on indefinite backorder
Did it break or just come apart. I did mine last year and don't remember the exact way it looks. I do know that they are fragile and it is easy for it to snap...happened to me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
it doesn't appear to have any broken plastic, or any ragged edges like it broke apart. It felt, sounded & looks like it just popped off the elbow.

It looks like it should snap back together. maybe i can figure a way to get the pictures off my phone and uploaded here since a picture might help
 

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they are very very fragile ...... will guess you broke it tho, you would have to post a picture to be sure.... Kane109 did the same thing and took it back and they ordered him a new one...
 

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Now, I was to toy with this over this winter, but this may be a good time to start a discussion on it.

Why not replace the filter with some other more readily available filter?

I am thinking:

Keep it all in the tank

Run a line from where the stock filter connects to a normal in line filter, then run a line from the filter to the low spot in the tank.

What am I missing here?

If they are so hard to get, why are we using them?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
here is a picture of how dirty the filter was when i pulled it out,

I did look at it very closely and see some spots around the open ring of the filter/strainer that do look like the plastic is broken, and not just able to pop the end of the elbow back into the ring around the opening of the filter

only about 7,000 miles on the bike. i am pretty sure i know when i got the bad gas, I am not sure if it was dirty gas, but i kinda did notice it didn't have the smell i am used to while fueling. It wasn't long after that the bike started having a stutter while accelerating and then eventually showed the FI light, the light didn't come on right away next time i rode the bike ,but eventually did. This combined with the stuttering is what led me to think fuel filter, so i pulled the tank to replace the spark plugs and check out the filter
 

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Can you post a good picture of your fuel pump, where the filter attaches?

And a good shot of the filter housing with a ruler or tape measure in the photo?
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Now, I was to toy with this over this winter, but this may be a good time to start a discussion on it.

Why not replace the filter with some other more readily available filter?

I am thinking:

Keep it all in the tank

Run a line from where the stock filter connects to a normal in line filter, then run a line from the filter to the low spot in the tank.

What am I missing here?

If they are so hard to get, why are we using them?
The fuel pump set-up is already at a nice low spot of the tank, the only real issue i can think of is the stock "strainer" is contained in rubber boot that holds gas and will keep it from running dry when the tank is low and your going downhill and leaned over & it may make the fuel gauge less accurate since it would not be secured in one spot and could conceivably move around

I don't think the M filters are as hard to come by as the C's are but still at 50 to 60 bucks a shot, a more readily available and less expensive alternative would be nice, maybe I'll tinker with that tomorrow since I am high&dry right now it can't hurt
 

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The fuel pump set-up is already at a nice low spot of the tank, the only real issue i can think of is the stock "strainer" is contained in rubber boot that holds gas and will keep it from running dry when the tank is low and your going downhill and leaned over & it may make the fuel gauge less accurate since it would not be secured in one spot and could conceivably move around

I don't think the M filters are as hard to come by as the C's are but still at 50 to 60 bucks a shot, a more readily available and less expensive alternative would be nice, maybe I'll tinker with that tomorrow since I am high&dry right now it can't hurt
Here is my thinking on that:

The stock filter is much like an in line filter.

We will use this one for example:



The inner filter element is like the filter in our bikes.

The housing is much like the rubber boot housing in our bikes.

So, the after market filter should hold a reserve of fuel just like the stock filter.

I am not saying to let it dangle.

Secure the new filter in place, in the same position the stock filter is held at by bringing a mount down off of the fuel pump mount arm.

You could actually skip the inlet hose that I mentioned and just have the inlet of the in line filter open to the tank.

This all relies on being able to get a tube and a hose clamp around the nub on the fuel pump, to which the stock filter connects.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
i have the pump back inside the tank, and buttoned up to keep from filling the garage with gas fumes,but from a quick glance at the elbow that mounts to the pump 3/8 I.D. fuel line would work and If i remember correctly the nub is at least a 1/4" long and should be enough to get a clamp on it

I have a few things that need tended too early tomorrow but dont have work and should be able to put some time into this after my errands are tended to. It'll be nice if i can get this working it is my favorite time of year to ride and I was beginning to feel like i was gonna be calling it a year til next spring
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 · (Edited)
your filter is broken. sorry. :dontknow:
:agree: dont be too sorry and lose any sleep over it though

after all i am the dumbas$ that broke it :D
 

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Now, I was to toy with this over this winter, but this may be a good time to start a discussion on it.

Why not replace the filter with some other more readily available filter?

I am thinking:

Keep it all in the tank

Run a line from where the stock filter connects to a normal in line filter, then run a line from the filter to the low spot in the tank.

What am I missing here?

If they are so hard to get, why are we using them?
I pulled mine last year to change it. Fortunately I had ordered 2 at that time. I broke one by basically blowing on it...that is how fragile. We talked about the exact same thing you were referring to as well. Curious on why not just bypass and throw an inline filter in it.
 

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Here is my thinking on that:

The stock filter is much like an in line filter.

We will use this one for example:



The inner filter element is like the filter in our bikes.

The housing is much like the rubber boot housing in our bikes.

So, the after market filter should hold a reserve of fuel just like the stock filter.

I am not saying to let it dangle.

Secure the new filter in place, in the same position the stock filter is held at by bringing a mount down off of the fuel pump mount arm.

You could actually skip the inlet hose that I mentioned and just have the inlet of the in line filter open to the tank.

This all relies on being able to get a tube and a hose clamp around the nub on the fuel pump, to which the stock filter connects.
I had my old filter in the shop, so it was easy to measure it.

The inlet is .430" in diameter, so a 3/8" hose would fit over it a little loose. Ideally a 7/16" would work better.

The filter has a recess that goes over the nipple on the pump. The depth of the recess is .275", so the nipple on the pump is a little longer than that. There should be room to put a thin hose clamp around it.

As far as using a filter like the one you have, it should work if it can be mounted to the pump some way. I'd consider mounting a sock on it similar to the ones on cars or trucks to help hold some fuel around it.
 

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When I changed out my tanks I cleaned my filter and it appears they all have very fine black stuff in them, I wonder if this ethanol fuel is eating away at the Slosh boxs around them, Like zoom told me about the boxes? I remember when it first came out it was flushing old carburetor cars fuel lines out and plugging their filters, and eating away at the older gaskets in the carbs.
 

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Now, I was to toy with this over this winter, but this may be a good time to start a discussion on it.

Why not replace the filter with some other more readily available filter?

I am thinking:

Keep it all in the tank

Run a line from where the stock filter connects to a normal in line filter, then run a line from the filter to the low spot in the tank.

What am I missing here?

If they are so hard to get, why are we using them?
When I did my first fuel filter replacement a long time ago, my wife worked at AutoZone. I literally went through every box, every catalog, and exhausted every resource (even went to CarQuest and did the same thing) to find a useable alternative that wasn't $50. Every filter that came close had the wrong end, was the wrong size, or had a straight where the elbow is. All of those filters were like $12.00, but nothing matched up. If you manage to find something else, let me know.

-Josh
 

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When I changed out my tanks I cleaned my filter and it appears they all have very fine black stuff in them, I wonder if this ethanol fuel is eating away at the Slosh boxs around them, Like zoom told me about the boxes? I remember when it first came out it was flushing old carburetor cars fuel lines out and plugging their filters, and eating away at the older gaskets in the carbs.
If you wipe the slosh box off when you remove it, you'll find it has deteriorated some. I'd guess some of the black comes from that, but more probably comes from all the rubber hoses in the pumps at the station.

I just heard a week or so ago that the EPA has now proposed going to E15, but it's up to stations whether or not they carry it. That's going to cause some problems in anything other than an E85 vehicle.
 

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Hey Jack, the filter is NASTY anyway so you should replace it...the new one is white like snow.

I like the inline filter opinion, why not just allow the bike to pull the fuel out of the tank and then install an inline filter.
 

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If you wipe the slosh box off when you remove it, you'll find it has deteriorated some. I'd guess some of the black comes from that, but more probably comes from all the rubber hoses in the pumps at the station.

I just heard a week or so ago that the EPA has now proposed going to E15, but it's up to stations whether or not they carry it. That's going to cause some problems in anything other than an E85 vehicle.
Oh that's just great I also heard that ethanol in fuel decreases the volume of gas we are actually getting. Now they want to dilute it even more???? Oh thats right global warming and the ozone. Silly me........
 
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