M109 Rider Forums banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
198 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A couple of days ago I installed a pair of Yani Shiki chromed levers in place of the OEMs. An extremely easy install even for the mechanically un-inclined. So, I jump on the interstate which is about a half mile from my house and head to a buddy's house about 30 miles away. This was during rush hour so there was a good deal of stop and go traffic to contend with.
After several stops I noticed that the brake lever had absolutely no play in it whatsoever. As I tried to proceed, the bike began to slow down and finally came to a dead stop in the center lane. I had no idea what was happening. So here I am holding up traffic which thanks to some very observant drivers, did not turn me into a hood ornament.
I turned the engine off, thinking at first that it had seized up, and held in the clutch and with great effort was able to push it to the shoulder. Sat the bike on the side stand and caught my breath. 5 min later I start the bike up put it in neutral and it rolls just fine. Now there is plenty of play in the brake lever. I haul my butt home and just as I turn onto my street the same thing happens all over again. Wait five minutes and everything is fine.
Closer examination at home reveals that the brake actuator never fully released because the new lever kept pressure on it. So each time I pulled the lever I added more pressure to the brakes until enough had built up to actually stop the bike. If I had compared the position of the actuator plunger position from the old lever, with the new lever position. I would have caught the problem earlier and simply filed down the portion of the lever that pushes the actuator. A scary lesson learned about after market chromed accessories
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
15,179 Posts
I do hope you contacted

the manufacture of the product, They could have some legal issues with that one. Glad you safe man!!
A couple of days ago I installed a pair of Yani Shiki chromed levers in place of the OEMs. An extremely easy install even for the mechanically un-inclined. So, I jump on the interstate which is about a half mile from my house and head to a buddy's house about 30 miles away. This was during rush hour so there was a good deal of stop and go traffic to contend with.
After several stops I noticed that the brake lever had absolutely no play in it whatsoever. As I tried to proceed, the bike began to slow down and finally came to a dead stop in the center lane. I had no idea what was happening. So here I am holding up traffic which thanks to some very observant drivers, did not turn me into a hood ornament.
I turned the engine off, thinking at first that it had seized up, and held in the clutch and with great effort was able to push it to the shoulder. Sat the bike on the side stand and caught my breath. 5 min later I start the bike up put it in neutral and it rolls just fine. Now there is plenty of play in the brake lever. I haul my butt home and just as I turn onto my street the same thing happens all over again. Wait five minutes and everything is fine.
Closer examination at home reveals that the brake actuator never fully released because the new lever kept pressure on it. So each time I pulled the lever I added more pressure to the brakes until enough had built up to actually stop the bike. If I had compared the position of the actuator plunger position from the old lever, with the new lever position. I would have caught the problem earlier and simply filed down the portion of the lever that pushes the actuator. A scary lesson learned about after market chromed accessories
 

·
Radio Active Member
Joined
·
27,668 Posts
Glad that nothing really bad happened to you. It is just the lack of R&D and trying to get the product out so they can make some $$.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,478 Posts
A few people here have had the same problem with the Cycle House levers.

When it comes to aftermarket stuff, espically items that can affect the performance of the bike, I double check everything. If I can't fix the problem, the parts go back.

I'd rather be safe than sorry. :bigthumbsup:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Dido!!

A couple of days ago I installed a pair of Yani Shiki chromed levers in place of the OEMs. An extremely easy install even for the mechanically un-inclined. So, I jump on the interstate which is about a half mile from my house and head to a buddy's house about 30 miles away. This was during rush hour so there was a good deal of stop and go traffic to contend with.
After several stops I noticed that the brake lever had absolutely no play in it whatsoever. As I tried to proceed, the bike began to slow down and finally came to a dead stop in the center lane. I had no idea what was happening. So here I am holding up traffic which thanks to some very observant drivers, did not turn me into a hood ornament.
I turned the engine off, thinking at first that it had seized up, and held in the clutch and with great effort was able to push it to the shoulder. Sat the bike on the side stand and caught my breath. 5 min later I start the bike up put it in neutral and it rolls just fine. Now there is plenty of play in the brake lever. I haul my butt home and just as I turn onto my street the same thing happens all over again. Wait five minutes and everything is fine.
Closer examination at home reveals that the brake actuator never fully released because the new lever kept pressure on it. So each time I pulled the lever I added more pressure to the brakes until enough had built up to actually stop the bike. If I had compared the position of the actuator plunger position from the old lever, with the new lever position. I would have caught the problem earlier and simply filed down the portion of the lever that pushes the actuator. A scary lesson learned about after market chromed accessories
The same thing happend to me! I took my calipers apart for paint and some other up grades on the 9 including the levers.
Out for a zip and WOW! As soon as I made a few applications I began to notice the front brakes holding. Pulled over, bleed them and headed home.
It happend again, so after some head scratching I looked over the return of the piston and sure enough it was not traveling all the way home.
Took my buffing wheel to it, removed the crome finish and that was enough to allow the fluid back into the res.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
198 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
It has become common practice now days, to manufacture a product and let the populace refine it. Microsoft is a good example, they make a new version of windows, and get all the bugs they can out of the software before releasing it to the public. But it is inevitable there will be issues with probably 20% of the computers out there. So people start calling and over the months, they finally iron out most of the bugs. In essence the public fixes the problems for Microsoft.
Anything after market should be used with a lot of scrutiny, examined and compared to the original for design flaws and defects. :doorag:
It appears that you're correct. Still it's a shame that we (the consumers) are treated that way. Especially considering what we are charged for aftermarket products. My best friend and riding buddy has a favorite saying. "You teach others how to treat you, by what you allow them to do to you" So I guess as long as we will pay some of the exorbitant prices that we pay for substandard products, there is no incentive for some companies to improve the quality of product.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
913 Posts
Sorry this happened to you, but if you would of researched aftermarket levers, you would of know what the problem was.

Many aftermarket accessory companies will get a master cylinder perch and make thier levers off the perch deminsions. So when they put everything together, everything works. But what they all forget is the brake light switch that gets attached to the bottom of the master cylinder perch.

There is nothing wrong with your levers, there is nothing wrong with the bike. Your brake lever is constantly putting pressure on the system, and when you are riding, the heat will build up extra pressure, making your calipers to close. Thus eventually making your bike come to a stop. After your brake fluid cools, your brakes will release

To simply fix this problem: You must grid down a plastic nub, and angle your brake switch back some

On the bottom of your master cylinder, there a black switch held on by one phillips head screw. Remove this screw. Your switch will just hang now. Remove the plug from the switch so you can hold the switch in your hand.

Now you can look at your switch, there is a little nub on the switch that goes into a recessed hold in the bottom of your master cylinder. You need to grind this nub down with whatever you got. A dremel tool, grider, grind wheel, chainsaw file, wood file. Its pretty soft plastic, just grind this down until its flush with the switch.

Plug switch back in, reinstall switch with phillips head screw, but now move the switch back to where the brake lever will go all the forward against the master cylinder perch.


This is the easiest fix. I've been through 3 sets of aftermarket levers and all had the same problem. I've grinded down the nub on the brake lever on one set, but grinded down too much, thus ruining that brake lever. This is the best fix

Any questions, feel free to pm me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
198 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for the information

Great information, thanks. Wish I'd known that before my little incident.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
102 Posts
:agree::agree:I used a razor blade and just cut it off.

Sorry this happened to you, but if you would of researched aftermarket levers, you would of know what the problem was.

Many aftermarket accessory companies will get a master cylinder perch and make thier levers off the perch deminsions. So when they put everything together, everything works. But what they all forget is the brake light switch that gets attached to the bottom of the master cylinder perch.

There is nothing wrong with your levers, there is nothing wrong with the bike. Your brake lever is constantly putting pressure on the system, and when you are riding, the heat will build up extra pressure, making your calipers to close. Thus eventually making your bike come to a stop. After your brake fluid cools, your brakes will release

To simply fix this problem: You must grid down a plastic nub, and angle your brake switch back some

On the bottom of your master cylinder, there a black switch held on by one phillips head screw. Remove this screw. Your switch will just hang now. Remove the plug from the switch so you can hold the switch in your hand.

Now you can look at your switch, there is a little nub on the switch that goes into a recessed hold in the bottom of your master cylinder. You need to grind this nub down with whatever you got. A dremel tool, grider, grind wheel, chainsaw file, wood file. Its pretty soft plastic, just grind this down until its flush with the switch.

Plug switch back in, reinstall switch with phillips head screw, but now move the switch back to where the brake lever will go all the forward against the master cylinder perch.

This is the easiest fix. I've been through 3 sets of aftermarket levers and all had the same problem. I've grinded down the nub on the brake lever on one set, but grinded down too much, thus ruining that brake lever. This is the best fix

Any questions, feel free to pm me.
 

·
Radio Active Member
2007 Candy Sonoma Red
Joined
·
22,864 Posts
After reading about this problem before I checked mine on the last two sets I installed. The original Cycle House holed levers with the M109R stamped in them would have had the same problem, so I drilled a hole in the back to let the brake light switch recess in it a little. I didn't want to cut it off in case I went back to stock or other levers. I now have a set of the Kuryakyn Wide Blade levers, which look and work like stock but are chromed and wider, and they fit just fine.

It's a good idea to check them to make sure there is always clearance between all parts once the lever is released.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top