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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
:edit:..as there has been some delays in import deliveries via USPS I post some information that might clear things out to people who are expecting something outside US (probaly already old news..but anyway):edit:

Emergency Information System Message

Message n° 0148/2010
11 November 2010 / 11 novembre 2010 à 20h20

ENGLISH/ANGLAIS

Dear Sir/Madam,

The designated operator of the UNITED STATES OF AMERICA wishes to inform the designated operators of UPU member countries of the following heightened security measures concerning mail transportation to the United States in light of recent terrorist threats to air transportation.

These heightened security measures will take effect on 18 November 2010 and will expire on 8 December 2010.

Security measures - passenger aircraft

On 9 November 2010, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security issued amended Aviation Security Directive 1544-10-05A and Emergency Amendment (EA) 1546-10-07A, applicable to international mail, parcels and EMS items sent to the United States via both U.S.- and foreign-flag passenger carriers. According to this security directive, an aircraft operator must not transport on passenger aircraft international mail cargo from non-U.S. locations containing items weighing 16 ounces (453 grammes) or more.

An aircraft operator may, however, transport international mail accepted from a designated operator, provided it has obtained the tendering statement described below. This tendering statement may be provided along with existing UPU shipping documentation, or the designated operator may provide it in a separate document. However, in no case may aircraft operators accept for transport on any aircraft any shipments originating or transferring from or transiting through Somalia or Yemen.

Designated operator tendering statement:
All mail pieces in this dispatch weighing 16 ounces (453 grammes) or more were received from a business in this country with an established relationship of more than 30 calendar days and an established shipping and billing address.
Airlines have been advised that any mail accepted according to the tendering statement identified above must not be transported on board any flight unless each individual piece has been screened. The responsibility for screening has been placed with the aircraft operators. The screening methods they should use are outlined in amended Security Directive 1544-10-05A and Emergency Amendment 1546-10-07A.
This policy also applies to any closed-transit international mail dispatches to the United States (regardless of whether the United States is the final destination of the dispatch or an intermediate transit point).

Security Measures - All-cargo and twelve-five aircraft

On 9 November 2010, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security issued amended Aviation Security Directive 1544-10-04A and Emergency Amendment (EA)1546-10-06A (this EA applies to all foreign air carriers regulated under 49 CFR 1546.101(e) and (f) conducting operations in the US), applicable to international mail and items defined as cargo in accordance with the Full All-Cargo Aircraft Operator Standard Security Program (FACAOSSP) and Twelve-Five Standard Security Program (TFSSP). This section excludes all items under 16 ounces (453 grammes), inbound Army Post Office (APO)/Fleet Post Office mail, aircraft operator company material (COMAT), diplomatic pouches, and all U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) shipments tendered on a US Government Bill of Lading (GBL). However, the aircraft operator must not accept for transport on any aircraft any shipments originating or transferring from or transiting through Somalia or Yemen.

For the purposes of this security directive and emergency amendment, at all non-U.S. locations, "cargo" shall be classified as "elevated risk cargo" when it meets one or more of the following conditions:

1. the supporting shipping documentation (including air waybills and manifests) for the cargo shipment describes the cargo as "personal effects" or "household goods", or the commodity information is determined to be missing or incorrect; or
2. the shipment is paid for by cash or personal cheque or shipped cash on delivery; or
3. the shipper does not have all of the following:
a. an established business relationship of more than 30 calendar days; and
b. an established shipping address; and
c. an established billing address; or
4. the International Air Transport Association (IATA)-registered agent, other cargo agent, freight forwarder, consolidator, regulated agent, or air carrier does not have all of the following:
a. an established business relationship of more than 30 calendar days; and
b. an established shipping address; and
c. an established billing address; or
5. the shipment is cargo accepted from an aircraft operator's direct employees or authorized representatives.

The aircraft operator must implement the following procedures for "elevated risk cargo":

Any cargo identified above must not be transported onboard any flight unless each individual piece has been screened. If any elevated risk cargo is found to contain printer or toner cartridges, the cargo must not be transported by air and the aircraft operator must maintain positive control of the cargo and notify the US Transportation Security Administration (TSA). The responsibility for screening has been placed with the aircraft operators. The screening methods that they should use are outlined in amended Security Directive 1544-10-04A and Emergency Amendment 1546-10-06A.
Effective 18 November 2010 at 17.00 GMT:
1. The foreign air carrier must screen all cargo consisting of international mail from non-U.S. locations weighing 16 ounces (453 grammes) or more. However, it may transport mail accepted from the designated operator and is not required to screen these shipments when the foreign air carrier obtains the tendering statement below. This statement may be provided as part of existing UPU shipping documentation or the designated operator may provide this statement as a separate document.
Designated Operator Tendering Statement:
All mail pieces in this dispatch weighing 16 ounces (453 grammes) or more were received from a business in this country that has an established relationship of more than 30 calendar days and an established shipping and billing address.
2. Any mail pieces accepted without the tendering statement identified above must be screened.

Summary

In summary, passenger aircraft transport of shipments containing items weighing 16 ounces (453 grammes) or more requires a:

· "business relationship";
· shipping address;
· billing address; and
· a designated operator tendering statement.

These shipments will require screening by the aircraft operator. All other items weighing 16 ounces (453 grammes) or more cannot be transported on passenger aircraft and will require cargo transport.

The regulations for transport on cargo aircraft are less stringent and require additional screening by the aircraft operator only when the items are classified as "elevated risk cargo". International mail shipments tendered under the terms of the "designated operator tendering statement" will not have to undergo the same level of screening as "elevated risk cargo".

These security measures became necessary after it was determined that the security and safety of postal employees and airline passengers worldwide were at risk. The 453-gramme weight limit referred to in this directive will provide an appropriate level of security safeguards while minimizing the impact on operational procedures for the dispatch of letter-post items. The latest UPU statistics on mail volumes show that only 2.4% of letter-post items weigh more than 500 grammes.

The designated operator of the United States wishes to thank you for your cooperation and understanding of the need to protect postal employees, airline passengers, transportation personnel and citizens throughout the world against the security risks posed by these terrorist threats to the international mail transportation chain.

Yours faithfully,

Akio Miyaji
Director of Operations and Technology
 
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