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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Engine Ice, radiator smoking

Just wondering if anyone else is running engine ice. I switched to engine ice about a month ago and all was fine. This past saturday night I took the bike out and it seemed like it was running a little hot. I was at a red light and noticed some smoke that I could only see from the head lights beam. I pulled into a gas station and turned it off to let it cool down. Started it back up and let it get to temp. Stared at the head light and saw it again. Looks more like a steam/vapor then smoke. The fan came on and it went away. So Im pin pointing it down to the radiator. Funny thing is, besides saturday night the fan never came on. Even during the day with 90+ weather.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Im wondering if somehow the radiator got poked when we changed the clutch cable during ocean city bike week.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Im gonna take it all apart when I get my clutch cable and try to see where its coming from.
 

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I'm getting ready to buy the new Amsoil coolant additive. I'm sure others like me here got an e-mail from the Rep introducing this product.
 

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i used to use something similar called 40 below in my mud bogging truck, it was the only way I could keep it from over heating once the radiator got full of mud. worked like a charm! I've been thinking of trying ICE but just havent pulled the trigger yet. Think this winter when i rip the 9 down i'll be giving ICE a shot.
 

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I'm not sure what good it does unless you have overheating problems to begin with. I've used it on cars where I couldn't fit a big enough radiator to adequately cool them, but we have plenty of cooling on this bike. And the thermostat is still going to hold it at the same temp with or without the ICE.
 

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Getting ready to buy a bottle

AMSOIL's New Dominator Coolant Boost

Racers demand lower engine operating temperatures in order to achieve maximum efficiency and horsepower on the track, while the straight water coolant used by many racers opens engines up to damaging radiator and water pump corrosion. AMSOIL Dominator® Coolant Boost (RDCB) provides racers and motorists with significantly lower engine operating temperatures, quicker engine warm-up times and advanced corrosion protection.
Dominator Coolant Boost is formulated with proprietary tiered surfactant technology, providing quick and effective heat transfer inside radiators and cylinder heads, which results in reduced operating temperatures, more efficient operation, increased horsepower and significantly reduced engine warm-up times in cold weather. Coolant Boost also contains a robust mixture of corrosion inhibitors that protect the radiator, heater core, water pump, cylinder heads, engine block and intake manifold from the damaging effects of corrosion.
Temperature Reduction Dynamometer Test
To test the temperature reduction capabilities of Dominator Coolant Boost, dyno tests were performed on a Chevy 350 cubic inch engine with an aluminum block and cylinder heads. Running the test with both straight water and water treated with Coolant Boost, the engine was operated at 4,500 rpm until coolant temperature stabilized.
COOLANT MIXTURESTABILIZED COOLANT TEMPERATURE
Straight Water​
221°F​
Water with Coolant Boost​
202°F​
Test results show water treated with Coolant Boost provided a 19°F temperature reduction.
Aluminum Corrosion Test
The Aluminum Corrosion Test (ASTM D-4340) measures the corrosion protection properties of Dominator Coolant Boost in modern automobile and high-performance race engines with aluminum cylinder heads. A cast aluminum puck was heated to 275°F at 28 PSI and exposed to the test coolant mixture for one week. Weight loss of less than 1.0 mg is required to pass the test.
COOLANT MIXTUREWEIGHT LOSSStraight Water3.97 mg/cm2/wkWater with Coolant Boost0.14 mg/cm2/wkTest results show water treated with Coolant Boost easily passed the Aluminum Corrosion Test.
Metal Corrosion Test
The Metal Corrosion Test (ASTM D-2570) measures corrosion protection properties in automotive cooling systems. Using ASTM corrosive water designed to simulate hard and corrosive water in degraded coolant, six metal coupons constructed of the most common metals in automotive cooling systems were exposed to the test coolant mixture at 190°F. The coolant was maintained at a temperature and flow rate equivalent to the operating conditions seen in most passenger vehicles. Corrosive weight loss suffered during the test determines the additive's corrosion protection properties.
METALSTRAIGHT WATER
WEIGHT LOSS
WATER WITH COOLANT BOOST
WEIGHT LOSS
Copper66mg7mgSolder120mg0mgBrass59mg3mgSteel54mg0mgCast Iron117mg0mgCast Aluminum89mg0mgTest results show water treated with Coolant Boost significantly reduced weight loss due to corrosion.
Recommendations
Dominator Coolant Boost is recommended with both racing applications using straight water coolant and automotive applications using 50/50 coolant/water mixtures.
Directions: With engine off and cool, make sure cooling system is filled with selected coolant. Shake bottle and pour calculated amount of Coolant Boost into radiator. Start engine, turn heat on high and run for 15 minutes. Do NOT use distilled water unless mixed with 50% antifreeze.
Dosage: For straight water applications, add 2 fl. oz. of Coolant Boost per quart of tap or softened water. For 50/50 coolant/water applications, add 1 fl . oz. of Coolant Boost per quart of 50/50 mix.
Frequency: In applications using Coolant Boost with straight water, drain and re-fill the coolant system and add Coolant Boost once per year or when indicated by color change. A distinctive pH color change indicates when the pH has fallen to a point where corrosion can set in. When the Coolant Boost/water mixture changes from pink to clear, another dosage of Coolant Boost should be added. Monitoring the pH level will ensure all vital areas of the cooling system are protected against corrosion.
In applications using Coolant Boost with 50/50 coolant/water mixtures, add Coolant Boost once per year or every 30,000 miles, whichever comes first. Follow coolant manufacturer recommendations for coolant change intervals.



 

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Interesting. I've always liked Amsoils synthetic oil. Lets us know if you use it and how it performs. With the cooler weather coming I wonder if you won't really be able to tell a difference until the heat of next summer.

These liquid cooled bikes are great. Unless you've ridden air cooled bikes in the past you just don't realize how nice it is to ride in 90+ heat hard in the mountains and still not have any heat hitting your legs. I've owned two straight Suzuki Fuel Injected/Liquid Cooled bikes and I just can't see ever riding a carbureted/air cooled bike ever again.

My radiator fan has only come on a handful of times during 7000 miles of riding this spring/summer here in the south.

Depending on how old your bike is I'd get the radiator system flushed & filled new every 24 months per the owners manual (Page 2-20 of Periodic Maintenance).
 

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I had a little coolant puking on this last trip to the Dragon. Not much and my light never came on, however I need to top off my resovoir and find out where it's coming from.
Now, after reading your post I may just flush everything out and start with fresh. According to OilDoc I'll only need 1 oz. per qt. of 50/50 mix.
 

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I'm not sure what good it does unless you have overheating problems to begin with. I've used it on cars where I couldn't fit a big enough radiator to adequately cool them, but we have plenty of cooling on this bike. And the thermostat is still going to hold it at the same temp with or without the ICE.
What's the best way to determine the temp on these 9s anywho? Does someone make a temp gauge? What is normal temp?
 

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What's the best way to determine the temp on these 9s anywho? Does someone make a temp gauge? What is normal temp?
adapted an automotive temp gauge. what zoom said was right, bike will run at t-stat rating but ice might help in prolonged stop and go traffic when the t-stat is fully open anyway. t-stat starts opening at 190f, fully open at 195f. as long as you are moving it will range between these two figures. when you are stopped for any length of time or in stop and go traffic expect 200f or better. the fan kicks on between 215f and 220f and you can see the temp gauge coming back down to 210f or so before it starts all over again. :bigthumbsup:
 
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