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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
OK I just bought a Blurple M109 on Fri, Sat i Dumped it
-I have never rode before and being inexperienced: i was pushed over toward a curve, by a car(no blinker) and couldn't control the motion.... anyways i don't like replaying it but long story short... i got knocked off my bike and i watched roll down the street at about 10 mph until it tipped on its side. It was pretty much the cars fault but i definitely didn't have control of the situation.....

-the damage isn't that bad (but its still hell to think about), a few scratches, broken blinker, skewed handlebars, and a bent rear brake pedal

-the main problem is that the bike wont start, it turns on but doesn't crank at all, and its making funny noises
- i called the dealership they said it was a problem with the fuel injection, and it needs to be reset.... does anyone know if i need special tools and computers for this, or is it something i can do myself..... also any other info about why it wont start is good too....
 

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Glad to hear you are okay... don't worry the bike will be back to normal soon enough :)

Just curious, are you sure the kill switch is in the run position? Make sure as it might have been flipped to kill when you went down or what not, and might just need to be turned back to run...

Good Luck!!!
 

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Again first off I'm glad you are ok. Could have been worse. Surprised to hear of that size of bike being your first. Not a very easy bike to learn on...size or power wise. Regardless, I think the dealership may be right, a fuel reset after a shacking like that should do the trick.
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Disconnect the battery for a while and that should re-set the computer. Good luck and get back on the road!!
 

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At least one rider on this site like his brake pedal BETTER after he bent it in a msihap like yours. You might have just done your first mod. (!)

Glad you're OK -- Sounds to me like the kill switch too -- that would make it an easy fix.
 

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WOW glad you are OK.
Cars with fuel injection have a dedicated switch that shuts the FI down in a big crash. There must be something like that going on.

Sledzep
 

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#1....very thankful you are ok!!!
#2 please.....please.....whatever you do, get some riding instruction and/or training. This is a very large bike to start with if you have never riden before. Think about your family without you.
 

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Ouch. Glad you're ok, though I have a concern for you if a kill switch is unfamiliar. The kill switch is the red rocker style switch on your handlebars, right side.
It may be a good idea to take a class, I've known several people that have and they swear by it. Each not having owned a motorcycle before. I think they're only a couple days.
Be Careful Man.
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Kill switch is the big red switch on the right side next to your throttle. Should be in the down position to run. Many times it gets accidentally pushed in the opposite direction getting off the bike or otherwise and can be a simple thing. Check it out to see if that may be the issue.
 

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squanine said:
the kill switch, do you guys mean the fuel shut off- like in cars, if so were is it located (again i have no manual at this time).....
Dude, I mean this with all due respect, but you REALLY need to study your owners manual if you don't know where the kill switch is on your bike. It's the big red switch on the right handlebar. Also, take a MSF course ASAP. This is a very big bike with tons of power and a somewhat twitchy throttle... all things that can work together to get you in trouble very quickly.

After checking to see that the kill switch is in the RUN positioni, check to see if your FI light remains on after the bike runs through the pressurization process when you turn the key on. When my bike fell off the side stand, it shut itself off (as it was designed to do). When I stood it back up, the FI light stayed on and the bike wouldn't start. I just turned the key off and back on a couple times to let the fuel injection system re-prime itself. Do this if your FI light stays on. Also, since you didn't know about the kill switch, I have to ask you if a couple simple things are happening. Are you making sure your side stand is up if trying to crank it in gear? Are you holding the clutch in while cranking? I really think it's either the kill switch or the FI system needs to re-prime. Try turning the key on and off a few times to see if that gets the FI light off.
 

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It may not be obvious from what Medic said -- The side stand has a lock-out mechanism built into it. It won't let you start it with the stand down, only with it up.
 

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Are you guys kidding us or what ?

This guy should sell this bike immediately and get something like a 650cc for his first bike.( and take the MSF course) He is definitely going to get killed or seriously hurt. Why would anyone start out on a bike with the most power of any cruiser on the road ?

Please get a smaller bike that you can control before you kill yourself !!!!!

Sorry if I am being blunt, but safety First, means safety FIRST !!!

Sheesh, we need to look out for each other, not be afraid to hurt each other's feelings.
 

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Oh yeah, and did you guys ever stop to think that maybe the bike Gods are trying to tell our novice friend something -----by giving him such a hard time and not letting the bike start up for him after a laydown???

It is just plain smart/healthy to get a much smaller bike for your first !!!! (put the macho thinking on hold for just a little while)
 

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squanine said:
...-I have never rode before and being inexperienced: i....
Now that you survived your first crash, go find a Motorcycle Safety Foundation class and get in it. Don't hit the open road until you get through the class before you get yourself on a less favorable list of statistics.
http://www.msf-usa.org/

Have fun and be safe,
Polartek
 

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The guy already has his money sunk into this bike. It's a little too late to tell him to go get a smaller one as I'm guessing he's completely upside down in the loan. However, the suggestions to take the MSF course are right on track. He can learn more on smaller bikes before getting back on his 109.

There are a number of other people on this site that got the 109 as their 1st street bike. Not my personal suggestion, but they seem to have done fine.

My suggestion at this point would be to follow advice of others here. Take the course, get your bike fixed, then ride VERY carefully for the next couple of months until you are extremely comfortable in nearly all situations you might find yourself in. Find some empty roads to practice on.

As for the repairs, this is one situation where I would strongly suggest getting it repaired by a pro. You did have insurance, didn't you? You should really find a competent shop to look things over. Primarily, make sure the forks are ok and aligned, and that there is no frame damage. If the insurance is going to cover it, just get everything fixed at once. Skipping a couple of steps won't make your record with the insurance company any better. Just bite the bullet, pay the deductible, and get it fixed right.
 

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Here's another vote for the MSF class. If you can't or don't want to take a class, there are several books with titles similar to "Motorcycling for the Beginner", etc. Anything to help you understand WHY things are the way they are. Also, let someone who knows the mechanics of a motorcycle check it out. The last thing you need right now is an ill-handling bike while you're trying to learn how to master it.

Sorry to hear that you had a "ragin' cager" incident so soon in your riding experience. It doesn't get any better, to be honest :confused: The only defense we have is knowledge and experience :)
 

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The 109's have a "TIP-OVER SENSOR" which shuts down the injection system in the event the bike is laid over on either side. The sensor sends a signal to the computer which shuts down the electric fuel pump. The computer has to be reset after such a incident for the FI system to function. Disconnect the battery for several minutes then reconnect it. Your bike should fire up.
 

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  First off, glad your OK!  That said, Sorry dude but I just gotta follow suit and ping you on getting that MSF course under your belt as soon as possible.  Since you bought the bike and likely can't wait to get back on once she's fixed, at least take it out to an abandoned parking lot and log in as many hours as you can.  Recommend you keep becoming intimate with the beast in a safe setting until your local MSF course can get you in.
  Understand this post, along with many others may seem like we're bashing you but I hope you realize that's not the case.  Think I'm safe in saying that your communicating with over a couple hundred years of collective motorcycle riding experience here at M109Riders.com and the overall consensus should be given a bit of thought.  You can learn alot from this site as well as from your road rash. 
  Now, not trying to sound all gay here, but I also like to believe that the majority of all folks that ride share a special bond and nobody wants to see any other rider put themself in an unsafe environment.  Ride Safe!  :doorag:   
 

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Well, first I'm glad your not hurt...except for your pride.
Now I'll tell you, you should have bought a 650 or 800 for a first bike and not this beast. It's very hard to learn how to ride and watch all the idiots on the road when you can barely control the power the bike has.
It's probably not feasable for you to trade now, but you might consider getting a cheap used 650 from someone and ride it for a few months until your more comfortable with the bike and until you get a MSF course finished.
I started with a 650 Yamaha V Star, after about 6 months I was ready for a bigger bike. I ended up keeping the V Star for about 3 years beacuse I really liked it and now I have the 109R. :bigthumbsup:
 
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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Also, don't forget with this bike, you have to have the cluth in to start the bike. This is the first bike I have owned that you have to do this with. I forget alot of the time. Doubt that is the issue, but just am trying to think of everything it could be.

Have to agree with my esteemed members here on training. Not to slam you, but because we care about all of our brotherhood here. Last thing any of us want to see is a fellow rider hurt especially if there is something we can do to help prevent it. When I fist started riding again, I practiced in parking lots and back roads where there was not alot of traffic. I took this one road like 100 times until I knew it like the back of my hand. Many times I still take it just to see how well I still know it. MSF is a must, plus you get a discount on your insurance in many states. Then after you go through the first course, take the advanced, trust me, it is worth the afternoon or two and you will remember much of what you learn.

Don't take the remarks you see here as people trying to slam you, but people trying to help you. We all want to see you and hear about you down the road, not on the side of the road bro. Best wishes.
 
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