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I've not rode a bike in 15 years and I'm not even sure this is being taught anymore. But I have used and practiced techniques in the past that enhanced riding as well as possible accident prevention. Counter-steering involves pushing the bikes grips forward in the direction you wanted the bike to lean. A simple technique and this does take a little practice to master. I've used this in the past in negotiating curves that I was a little too speedy into and in a situation where a cager cut over into my lane. In both situations it helped me to negotiate quicker, than if I had taken time to transfer my weight as normal to get the bike to lean.

Be careful out there!
 
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They discussed it but did not teach it at the "hands on' part of the beginners course. At the advanced course they talked about it and had us practice it. I was shocked at how many people never knew about it.
 

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I think you have to use it to ride but most of us do it without realizing it. I grew up when there were no riding schools so the first time I heard about countersteering I freaked out but sure enough thats how ya corner. should come natural to most, I hope.
 

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I teach the MSF course. The answer is YES. In fact, we practically pound it into them.

On the "Pressing To Initialte Lean" exercise, you are going faster than 10 mph. You can definitely get the hang of it.

From some of the responses, it's either been a while since some of you took it, or you are repeating second-hand knowledge.
 

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Wanted said:
I teach the MSF course. The answer is YES. In fact, we practically pound it into them.

On the "Pressing To Initialte Lean" exercise, you are going faster than 10 mph. You can definitely get the hang of it.

From some of the responses, it's either been a while since some of you took it, or you are repeating second-hand knowledge.
I took it last fall with my wife, we did the press exercise but we were going nowhere near fast enough to really feel countersteering. In most cases people were just swerving around the cones. I asked my wife (who had never been on a bike before) after the course to describe how she felt doing it and she had zero concept of countersteering.

We went for a ride down some of the back roads by our house in the 30+mph range and I told her what to expect. She had a much better grasp of it after that.
 

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Felix T Cat said:
I took it last fall with my wife, we did the press exercise but we were going nowhere near fast enough to really feel countersteering. In most cases people were just swerving around the cones. I asked my wife (who had never been on a bike before) after the course to describe how she felt doing it and she had zero concept of countersteering.
I'm not saying this is the case with your wife, but as instructors, we often have a VERY hard time with women (especially first-timers) who simply will not ride as fast on the course as we want them to. It is a real striggle to get them to speed up.

In our program, we are considering the idea of abandoning the MSF cirriculum altogether and going with the so-called "Oregon" cirriculum instead, which is a more rigourous course and emphasizes a lot more street-related skills.
 

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I fully agree with getting "newbies' up to speed in the parking lot although I must say that there were a few in the class that should not have been there and anything over 10mph would have been bad.

Here in PA they have the basic course and then the advanced course. The basic uses their bikes and teaches enough to get out of someone's way. The advanced uses your own bike and covers more advanced topics. We will probably take the advanced this fall.
 

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Felix T Cat said:
Here in PA they have the basic course and then the advanced course. The basic uses their bikes and teaches enough to get out of someone's way. The advanced uses your own bike and covers more advanced topics. We will probably take the advanced this fall.
The course you have in PA is the same one we have here in Illinois and in 49 states (except Oregon, which has developed their own).

The ERC (Experienced Rider Course) has a lot of the same stuff, but as you said, you do it on your own bike. There is one cool part where we make ya do the cones one-handed... :p
 

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Felix T Cat said:
I must say that there were a few in the class that should not have been there and anything over 10mph would have been bad.
:eek: Hello? That's exactly the people that need to be in the class. The class isn't for experienced riders (not that they can't learn from it), it's to take pure novices/neophites who have never straddled a motorcycle and make them competent riders. The thought that some people shouldn't even be there is completely ludicrous. Just because somebody isn't as good as you doesn't mean they should be prohibited from enjoying the sport we all love. Props to them for seeing the need and taking the class.
 

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Medic1210 said:
it's to take pure novices/neophites who have never straddled a motorcycle and make them competent riders.Â
I agree with most of what you just said... but I would hesitate to say that we are making "competent riders" out of anyone. As I like to say to the students at the end, "Congratulations... you are now qualified to go riding around in a parking lot some more." ;)

IN other words, we are basically giving them the tools and knowledge to go out and become competent riders on their own.
 

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Wanted said:
IN other words, we are basically giving them the tools and knowledge to go out and become competent riders on their own.
Right, maybe the "competent" part was a bit of a stretch, but the thought of keeping certain people out of the class because of their lack of experience is completely counterintuitive.
 

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Medic1210 said:
Right, maybe the "competent" part was a bit of a stretch, but the thought of keeping certain people out of the class because of their lack of experience is completely counterintuitive.
Agreed.
 

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Yes they teach counter steering in PA beginners rider class, but as previously mentioned, you can't make people twist the throttle.

Yes, there are always people who have different learning curves, described as "do not belong" in a previous post. The class is really great for these and other riders to expect differeing skill levels on the road too.

There were 4 bike damaging crashes in the class I took. Thank goodness there were lots of replacement bikes around at no additional cost.

I wonder how many put their own bikes down in the advanced course. Anyone seen it?
 

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GTBozak said:
I wonder how many put their own bikes down in the advanced course. Anyone seen it?
I have seen it happen, but it's very rare.

From my experience, I would say the primary cause of laydowns in the BRC (Basic RiderCourse) is stopping without squaring the handlebars first.

I've never seen 4 crashes in a single class. Man, that must have been something else. Did any of them quit?
 
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