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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My brake shoes lasted for 30k miles and were running thin except for the rear one, it was down to the metal and had made some gouging on the rotor.

I changed them and rode 3k miles went I heard a hard scraping when I came to a stop. It was the rear pads again, down to the metal again.

Is this going to happen from now on on my rear brakes?

Did I ruin my rear rotor and now I need to replace the rotor?

Is there a fix like sanding or somehow smoothing out the rotor, I have never heard of motorcycle rotors being turned.

If I do need to replace it is $230-ish the best price anyone has seen.

Once again I appreciate the info/feedback/advice.

Thanks


Ray
:super:
 

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How about a pic of it? There is a spec to the rotor. You just need to mic it and see if it is above spec and replace or resurface as needed. Keep in mind that the thinner the rotor gets, it will heat up faster. Are you sure that you do not have a caliper or brake line hanging up causing the rear pads to wear out that fast?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
How about a pic of it? There is a spec to the rotor. You just need to mic it and see if it is above spec and replace or resurface as needed. Keep in mind that the thinner the rotor gets, it will heat up faster. Are you sure that you do not have a caliper or brake line hanging up causing the rear pads to wear out that fast?
rynosback,

When I noticed the pads were worn out I rode straight to the dealer and showed him the rotor. They had worked on the engine just a month ago for the bad clutch and in the process had to disconnect the rear line to do the work.

They put it up on the lift and checked it to see if it might be hanging or not releasing causing the pads to wear prematurely.

That was ok, they said a rough rotor would wear out a new pad fast which is what they thing is the problem here.

I dont see any bad gouges on the rotor, in fact its more like extra metal material from the pads that appear to be in places on the rotor. Its hard to tell from the pics. I cant mic it but the finger test as you run it across the rotor says there is no real wear on the rotor its self, just some extra metal in places and hard metal rubbing on it, if that makes any sense.

Can a bike rotor be turned, they said it couldn't.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Unless you can get it turned it's probably gone.

Here's one on ebay. It's a little rusted but that will clean off. Buy It Now for $49.95 plus $13.33 shipping.

http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/Suzu...6140764QQptZMotorcyclesQ5fPartsQ5fAccessories

You might post you need one in the Classifieds too. Folks swap out for different rotors and may have a stock one. You see front rotors on here a lot.
Zoom,

Yeah, I saw that. not a bad price. On a scale of 1 to 10, 10 being hard to do, where is this job on that scale.
 

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Zoom,

Yeah, I saw that. not a bad price. On a scale of 1 to 10, 10 being hard to do, where is this job on that scale.
if 10 is hard, this is a 2, honestly. You need the axle tool and a torque wrench. Also a decent size wrench for the axle nut. Undo the bolt for the brake caliper bracket and take that off. You then remove the rear wheel. At that point, undo all the bolts and remove the rotor. Put new one back on, blue locktite, torque to 16ft/lbs and reinstall. You can actually do it with the axle through the rim and the rim still on the bike as well but it isn't worth it.

If you have the bike up in the air, turn the wheel and see if it freely turns. If it is binding up and the brakes are on, I wonder if you don't have a seized up caliper.

I would not turn the rotor as it is so thin already. You need a decent amount shaved off to get rid of the gouge, it will be way under spec.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
if 10 is hard, this is a 2, honestly. You need the axle tool and a torque wrench. Also a decent size wrench for the axle nut. Undo the bolt for the brake caliper bracket and take that off. You then remove the rear wheel. At that point, undo all the bolts and remove the rotor. Put new one back on, blue locktite, torque to 16ft/lbs and reinstall. You can actually do it with the axle through the rim and the rim still on the bike as well but it isn't worth it.

If you have the bike up in the air, turn the wheel and see if it freely turns. If it is binding up and the brakes are on, I wonder if you don't have a seized up caliper.

I would not turn the rotor as it is so thin already. You need a decent amount shaved off to get rid of the gouge, it will be way under spec.
Thanks BigpapaM109,

I guess it will run fine with the rotor as it is now?
 

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Thanks BigpapaM109,

I guess it will run fine with the rotor as it is now?
If it is just eating into the rotor, I don't think you will have a problem...other then the noise if any. My real concern is if the caliper is binding up. When you left off the throttle, clutch in, does the bike try to slow down quick as if the rear brake is stuck on? I definitely wouldn't go on any rides this way, but it is fine to get to the dealer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
If it is just eating into the rotor, I don't think you will have a problem...other then the noise if any. My real concern is if the caliper is binding up. When you left off the throttle, clutch in, does the bike try to slow down quick as if the rear brake is stuck on? I definitely wouldn't go on any rides this way, but it is fine to get to the dealer.
No, I dont believe the caliper is sticking, at least now this time. Put about 50 miles last nite after putting on the pads and another 100 today for fun. No noise and does not seem to be binding. I really think if I got the chisel to the rotor I could knock off some of the high spots :joke: I'll bet it will run good for a while still.

Thanks for the input fellers, if I need to get another rotor I know where to look and if the one on there is gonna last or not its gonna cost a set of pads to find out. Still less than the price of a new rotor.
:D
 

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rynosback,

When I noticed the pads were worn out I rode straight to the dealer and showed him the rotor. They had worked on the engine just a month ago for the bad clutch and in the process had to disconnect the rear line to do the work.

They put it up on the lift and checked it to see if it might be hanging or not releasing causing the pads to wear prematurely.

That was ok, they said a rough rotor would wear out a new pad fast which is what they thing is the problem here.

I dont see any bad gouges on the rotor, in fact its more like extra metal material from the pads that appear to be in places on the rotor. Its hard to tell from the pics. I cant mic it but the finger test as you run it across the rotor says there is no real wear on the rotor its self, just some extra metal in places and hard metal rubbing on it, if that makes any sense.

Can a bike rotor be turned, they said it couldn't.
The extra material that you see sticking to the rotor is probably galling. It's probably not pad material but rotor material that has balled up and created those little high spots.

You can take them off with a sharp chisel and then you can sand any high spot that is still left with a small disc sander (I use a 2" right angle air sander). They need to be off there or they can eat up pads and cause pulsing in the rear brake.

It could be that it galled just because you let it get down to the backing pad of the pads and if that's the case it probably won't happen again if you get it cleaned off.

I have seen a rotor that continued to gall over and over again and finally had to be replaced. Each time the galling returned the brakes would pulse obnoxiously.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
The extra material that you see sticking to the rotor is probably galling. It's probably not pad material but rotor material that has balled up and created those little high spots.

You can take them off with a sharp chisel and then you can sand any high spot that is still left with a small disc sander (I use a 2" right angle air sander). They need to be off there or they can eat up pads and cause pulsing in the rear brake.

It could be that it galled just because you let it get down to the backing pad of the pads and if that's the case it probably won't happen again if you get it cleaned off.

I have seen a rotor that continued to gall over and over again and finally had to be replaced. Each time the galling returned the brakes would pulse obnoxiously.
Sounds reasonable.

Worst case scenario I will need to replace the rotor anyway.

I forgot to mention that this outer side of the rotor is the only side effected. The side of the rotor to the wheel is unaffected.

I was really joking about the chisel but it seems that removing the extra material could get the rotor working right again.

Of course all that extra work could be eliminated by just replacing the rotor with a used one.

Weigh the cost of materials against the cost of replacement, hmmmmmm

Thanks tpres500

Ray
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Sounds reasonable.

Worst case scenario I will need to replace the rotor anyway.

I forgot to mention that this outer side of the rotor is the only side effected. The side of the rotor to the wheel is unaffected.

I was really joking about the chisel but it seems that removing the extra material could get the rotor working right again.

Of course all that extra work could be eliminated by just replacing the rotor with a used one.

Weigh the cost of materials against the cost of replacement, hmmmmmm

Thanks tpres500

Ray
:super:
If the rotor surface is otherwise unaffected, then carefully chiseling the balls off (on the rotor please not on yourself:D) then carefully sanding them smooth will probably solve the issue.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
If the rotor surface is otherwise unaffected, then carefully chiseling the balls off (on the rotor please not on yourself:D) then carefully sanding them smooth will probably solve the issue.
Hahaha,

Yeah, gots to be careful. I've had my share of accidents with sharp objects.:D
 

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I would try sanding a small area on it with 100 to 120 grit emery cloth and see what it does. It's hard to tell in the pictures if it's galling or if it's just built up pad material. Once you sand it off you can tell if it's galling because there will be small pits, or sometimes longer strips, where the rotor material was removed and displaced.

You said the inside looks good, did the pads wear on that side too?
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I would try sanding a small area on it with 100 to 120 grit emery cloth and see what it does. It's hard to tell in the pictures if it's galling or if it's just built up pad material. Once you sand it off you can tell if it's galling because there will be small pits, or sometimes longer strips, where the rotor material was removed and displaced.

You said the inside looks good, did the pads wear on that side too?
Zoom,

yes is did wear down the pad but did not get down to the metal.

Seems the inside of the rotor is good.
 

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your rear rotor does not look thin... I change my rear pads with each rear tire and the same for the front...
This has happen to me once, I got lucky as it was not too deep... I drop some EBC pads on and they smooth the rotor out after about 500+ miles 7000 miles later, I'm on next rear tire and another set of EBC... no problem
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
your rear rotor does not look thin... I change my rear pads with each rear tire and the same for the front...
This has happen to me once, I got lucky as it was not too deep... I drop some EBC pads on and they smooth the rotor out after about 500+ miles 7000 miles later, I'm on next rear tire and another set of EBC... no problem
Thanks Listan,

So far the rotor seems fine. I have not tried sanding the rotor yet but even so it looks alright. Think I got lucky and caught it before I did too much damage.
 
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