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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just installed the DLP Heavy duty clutch kit and the MTC springs. Followed the instructions from BigPapa's site and also the adjustment recommendations from the 109 Manual. Everything went in fine and bike rode well, but within first 5 miles of ride started to notice a slip on the clutch when accelerating. Brought the bike home and noticed all the play at the clutch lever had gone. Readjusted to get the 10-15mm play at the lever and the slip still remained. Decided then to investigate at the source and took off the clutch cover to discover that the basket had a covering of clutch material in it; also found that the 1st drive plate (one just behind the driven plate closest to the outside of the bike) was almost stripped on one side (i.e. all the raised areas had been almost completely flattened - photo 1 shows the shredded plate while photo 2 shows what the adjacent plate #2 looks like).

Question is now do I have to replace all the plates or can I just replace the one plate that has been worn down (and after only some 20 miles of riding)? Also as all the plates are the Cycle House heavy duty ones, do I have to replace with that plate or can I replace with a standard Suzuki one?

Given how much material appears to have been worn off I'll also do an oil and filter change out. Any advice on what to do with the clutch plate appreciated - and any thoughts on why it might have happened?
 

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I think if it was my bike I would change the oil and replace any worn plates. Then when adjusting the cable end play at the clutch perch it should be .500 or 1/2 inch to .625 or 5/8 inch. Reguardless of what anyone here or anywhere tells you this is the factory spec. Under hard acceleration this amount of lever free play is taken up and eliminates the chance of clutch slippage which is what you suffered. This free play is measured from the end of the clutch lever to the hand grip whith the bike not running...
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Should I be able to replace just the shredded plate or do you think I need to replace all the clutch plates? Reason I'm wondering is that the 4 remaining ones will be the Cycle House heavy duty plates and if I change one it will likely be a Suzuki standard plate (if you can buy just 1 rather than the set).

Had originally set the free play as per the manual but it was all taken up when I checked the bike after the ride (and noted the slippage). Wondering why it all went, even when set to spec?

Will definitely change the oil and filter as there's likely to be a lot of clutch plate crud floating through it.
 

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I would replace all the plates, and do it again.
Only this time, you need to measure the the clutch plate stack width and make sure you order the right part# for parts 6,7,& 8.
Part#'s 6, 7, and 8 are the same part just different widths. Which one you buy depends on the overall clutch stack width.
I believe the reason most people get away with the stock part#6 when replacing a stock clutch, is because it's usually the right one given they are stock. An aftermarket clutch however may be different and require a different plate to get the stack width right.

If it was my bike, I would just do it again, only buy stock clutch plates, and forget the aftermarket ones. Stock work just fine.
 

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I would replace all the plates, and do it again.
Only this time, you need to measure the the clutch plate stack width and make sure you order the right part# for parts 6,7,& 8.
Part#'s 6, 7, and 8 are the same part just different widths. Which one you buy depends on the overall clutch stack width.
I believe the reason most people get away with the stock part#6 when replacing a stock clutch, is because it's usually the right one given they are stock. An aftermarket clutch however may be different and require a different plate to get the stack width right.

If it was my bike, I would just do it again, only buy stock clutch plates, and forget the aftermarket ones. Stock work just fine.
Roger that!!!! Stock plates are the way to stay. As he said, you could try it, but get the caliper/micro out and measure before hand. All about the measurements.
 

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Whats the proper spec for the stack?
That's a good question. The dealer measured mine last time and recommended the right part#. He did tell me, but I can't recall. I keep forgetting to call or check when I'm in there.
I will try and find out.
 

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I would replace all the plates, and do it again.
Only this time, you need to measure the the clutch plate stack width and make sure you order the right part# for parts 6,7,& 8.
Part#'s 6, 7, and 8 are the same part just different widths. Which one you buy depends on the overall clutch stack width.
I believe the reason most people get away with the stock part#6 when replacing a stock clutch, is because it's usually the right one given they are stock. An aftermarket clutch however may be different and require a different plate to get the stack width right.

If it was my bike, I would just do it again, only buy stock clutch plates, and forget the aftermarket ones. Stock work just fine.
:agree: AND I would soak the friction plates in oil before assembly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Canuk, not sure which plates you mean for parts 6, 7 & 8 - do you count drive plate #2 (the first plate closest to the engine in the basket) as part 1?

The service manual (page 3-96) indicates that the 5 friction drive plates all have the same dimensions for thickness and similarly the 2 driven plates (with friction material on just one side) both have the same thickness dimensions so, I would assume any of the 5 drive plates are interchangeable and similarly the 2 driven plates could be interchanged. Am I missing something, want to make sure I take no chances this time.

As to the service limits for the plates, Page 11-28 with the service info shows:
- Drive plate #1 (there are 5 of them, friction material both sides) : 3.52-3.68mm,
- Drive plate #2 (only 1 of them, steel plate installed first within the clutch basket): 1.92-2.08mm,
- Driven plate #1 (4 of them, just steel plates) : 2.82-2.98mm,
- Driven plate #2 (2 of them, they have friction material on one side): 3.32-3.48mm

Thanks for everyone's comments and advice so far.
 

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Canuk, not sure which plates you mean for parts 6, 7 & 8 - do you count drive plate #2 (the first plate closest to the engine in the basket) as part 1?

The service manual (page 3-96) indicates that the 5 friction drive plates all have the same dimensions for thickness and similarly the 2 driven plates (with friction material on just one side) both have the same thickness dimensions so, I would assume any of the 5 drive plates are interchangeable and similarly the 2 driven plates could be interchanged. Am I missing something, want to make sure I take no chances this time.

As to the service limits for the plates, Page 11-28 with the service info shows:
- Drive plate #1 (there are 5 of them, friction material both sides) : 3.52-3.68mm,
- Drive plate #2 (only 1 of them, steel plate installed first within the clutch basket): 1.92-2.08mm,
- Driven plate #1 (4 of them, just steel plates) : 2.82-2.98mm,
- Driven plate #2 (2 of them, they have friction material on one side): 3.32-3.48mm

Thanks for everyone's comments and advice so far.
If you look at the diagram of the entire clutch set up,you will see part#6 listed there. But you won't see part#7 or #8. Those two are pictured to the top right of the diagram by themselves. The implication is that they are the same as part#6, just different widths. Hope that helps
 

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Would you buy a new gasket for the engine casing as part of this procedure if you haven't been in the engine yet or will the existing gasket come away freely without tearing or breaking up?
 

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I agree with V42A9, did you soak all the plates incl. the metals in oil for at least 24 hours before you installed them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Soaked all the friction plates overnight but not the metal ones. Not sure what soaking the full metal plates would have done; the friction material would soak up and retain some oil but would assume that all the oil would do is slide off the metal plates.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Forgot to add - with regards the gasket, they're relatively cheap (<$20) and when taking off the clutch cover I found the gasket did stick and I couldn't get it off in a single piece. Always think it's easier to replace the gasket after fulling cleaning the mating surfaces, saves all the hassle of trying to get back in and rectify an oil leak.
 

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Would you buy a new gasket for the engine casing as part of this procedure if you haven't been in the engine yet or will the existing gasket come away freely without tearing or breaking up?
I've had mine apart quite a few times, and re-used the seal each time. As long as it doesn't tear it seems to be good to re-use.
 
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Hmmm...I replaced the stock plates with the same ones you did, keeping the original steel plates. That was almost 10K miles back and I've never had an issue with the clutch slipping. I'm not disputing anyone else's theories about stack height, but I'm wondering why I didn't have the same issue:dontknow:...and I know I'm not alone. DLP has sold tons of those plates, and I don't remember any other threads about the clutch slipping right after installing them.
 
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