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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
can the turn signal Lense be taken off and replaced with clear, and if so how is it done.
 

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You buy a set of clear lens from Custom Dynamics or cruiser Customizing, etc.
Undo the screw on your lens cover, turn lens to remove and then put the clear ones on, turn, and replace screw.
The problem is that you'll have to go to colored bulbs then and some of these will overheat.
I finally went to LED bulbs which run much cooler. The next problem is LEDs draw so little juice that you'll have to put load equalizers in the wiring to make them flash at the right speed.
I think it's worth the time and effort.
Jerbear

 

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do you know what type of resistor is needed for the LED swap? are these load equalizers just a series of resistors in line?


-Chad


ps- looks good, maybe that smoked spray lens tint from MHT would blend nicely with the black bike.....
 

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Chad,
I don't know offhand but I could probably get the info as a friend makes his own from Radio Shack parts.
We installed a Kuryakyn Run, Turn, and Brake with Brake light modulator to work with my rear signals, plate LEDs and tail light. This setup came with a load equalizer for the rear setup. On the front, we used a metric load equalizer from Kuryaken that costs about $16.00.
Jer
 

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I was curious because I want to do that LED strip mod that a couple of other guys have already rigged. I'm just waiting to get my safety inspection sticker for 2006 ( they expire for all motorcycles every may 31st) before I mod the blinkers. Massachusetts dealers are hot and cold about modded blinkers.....

plus I would like to set it up so that I can easily detach the stock blinkers/license plate assembly and re attach them next year for the sticker
 

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The corrfect resistor/flasher will be listed on most pages where the actual LED lights are sold. Just take a look
and they jump right out at you.

Sledzep
 

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a typical resistor from radio shack probably won't work well because of the heat, unless you can get one for the right power.

i think the best solution is this...

it's a programmable flasher relay replacement that also has a built in load equalizer that does just what you need. it's 40 bones. i've got one of these, but i haven't had time to put it on yet.

if ya wanna go the cheaper route, for 16 bucks you can get just a plain load equalizer.

 

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Aussie,
The chrome covered incandescent globes were the ones that overheated on mine and melted taking part of the lens with them.
That's why I went to leds (much cooler) to solve the problem. Keep an eye on yours and let me know if you have better luck with the covered incandescents than I did.
Jerbear
 

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jerbear said:
Aussie,
The chrome covered incandescent globes were the ones that overheated on mine and melted taking part of the lens with them.
That's why I went to leds (much cooler) to solve the problem. Keep an eye on yours and let me know if you have better luck with the covered incandescents than I did.
Jerbear
OK will do but as they are flashers they should not run as hot hopefully
 

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If they're only running as flashers, you might get by as I converted my rear to run, turn, and brake which meant they were on all the time, and they were the first to melt.
Our front signals over here also function as running lights, and turn flashers, and they went shortly thereafter. Bulbs melted down and exploded melting a good section of the inside of the clear lens too.
Good luck on yours!
Jerbear
 

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bob109 said:
Just some thoughts on "load equalizers"....

Remedy: Place a in-line resistor of 4 WATTS value into you circut. In addition to the 1 WATT LED, you have returned the circut load to 5 WATTS. Your signal flasher act accordingly to the 5 WATT load and flashes normally.
There is no such thing as a "4 watt resistor". Resistance is measured in ohms, not watts.

I simply mention this so that someone doesn't embarrass themselves going into an electronics store and asking for a 4-watt resistor.
 

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So, we are looking at a need of 36 ohms in resistors to simulate 4 watts on a 12 volt system.
 

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Wanted said:
There is no such thing as a "4 watt resistor". Resistance is measured in ohms, not watts.

I simply mention this so that someone doesn't embarrass themselves going into an electronics store and asking for a 4-watt resistor.
You are absolutely right I erred and removed that post. Been twenty nine years since I had my basic electronics class....guess I'm loosing it a little. If you decrease the ohm load by using LED lights you have to make up for the lost ohms with the in-line resistor. Guess you would have to use a ohm meter on you stock bulb and take a reading. Do the same with the LED. The difference between the two would be the required ohms of the in-line resistor! I think that sounds right???
 

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as long as the bike has a normal pin out flasher you can replace it with an electronic flasher from auto zone for about $15 and it fixes the problem because it does not care what the load is. sure cheaper than "load equalizers" and I think the people selling those are getting the "load".
 

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steve j said:
as long as the bike has a normal pin out flasher you can replace it with an electronic flasher from auto zone for about $15 and it fixes the problem because it does not care what the load is. sure cheaper than "load equalizers" and I think the people selling those are getting the "load".
Steve, I am about 2 days away from ordering some new LED lights. can you tell me more about exactly what to look for??
I was just going to order what they said I needed in the LED write up. I would rather replace a plug in module that wire something in.
I will be replacing all 4 turn signals at the same time so this sounds good.
 

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Bob,

It's been many years since I've worked with a situation like this but here's my thoughts on this subject.

I'm afraid that if you try to measure the resistance of an LED lamp you'll be in for a surprise.  LED's are not a purely resistive device, actually they are considered a solid-state device.  The best way is to calculate the series resistance of the LED.  You'll need is to measure the current draw of the regular bulb.  Divide (roughly) 13.7 (volts) by the current you measured.  This result is the resistance of the bulb.  Make sure that the motor is operating while you do this.  If you don't, your result will be off.  Do the same with the LED bulb.  Only divide 13 volts not 13.7 volts by the current.  You might need to make a jumper to do this.  Since the current draw of the LED will be less than the incandescent bulb, the resistance of the LED bulb is higher than the regular bulb.  Adding a resister in SERIES with the LED would defeat your intention.  The resister must be placed in parallel (to ground) to increase the current flow through the blinker module.  Unfortunately I can't remember the formula to calculate the proper resistance for the additional resistor.  I'll check it out and try to get back to you.
 

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wyomork said:
Bob,

It's been many years since I've worked with a situation like this but here's my thoughts on this subject.

I'm afraid that if you try to measure the resistance of an LED lamp you'll be in for a surprise. LED's are not a purely resistive device, actually they are considered a solid-state device. The best way is to calculate the series resistance of the LED. You'll need is to measure the current draw of the regular bulb. Divide (roughly) 13.7 (volts) by the current you measured. This result is the resistance of the bulb. Make sure that the motor is operating while you do this. If you don't, your result will be off. Do the same with the LED bulb. Only divide 13 volts not 13.7 volts by the current. You might need to make a jumper to do this. Since the current draw of the LED will be less than the incandescent bulb, the resistance of the LED bulb is higher than the regular bulb. Adding a resister in SERIES with the LED would defeat your intention. The resister must be placed in parallel (to ground) to increase the current flow through the blinker module. Unfortunately I can't remember the formula to calculate the proper resistance for the additional resistor. I'll check it out and try to get back to you.
Thank you! When I had my Electronics Training in 1972 LED's didn't even exist to my knowledge :) :).......I guess us old timers have a lot to learn from the younger generation :) :) :).....again, thank you for taking the time to explain LED's. Any additional info would be appreciated. At some point I intend to add LED's to my ride and would like them to work correctly!
 

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sledzep01, just look at the flasher and if it has the normal number of pins/spades like most car/bike flashers you can get an electronic flasher to replace the mechanical one. the electronic flasher does not care what the load is it will flash the same speed all the time. lots cheaper than load equalizers. I ran into this problem on my 03' Honda Sabre that was the only bike I ever had with like a 4 pin flasher so the replacement electronic ones would not work. I got screwed buying a load equalizer from Kury that did not do what it was supposed to. I finally soldered in a 200 ohm resistor in each signal wire to get them to flash at a normal speed.
 
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