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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
It's been a while since I welded aluminum with a TiG setup. I have some practice pieces but for some reason I cannot get the welds consistent. Either it won't pool properly or suddenly overheats the material into a pool of goo..

Anyone here that can give me some pointers? It's been about 25 years since I worked with aluminum. I'm running a Miller Diversion 165 unit.
 

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Did you give your tungsten a "zap" on something to melt the tip to a round ball? This softens the arc for aluminum.
Just something I learned years ago.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Finger temp control

and

Normally, I prep the tungsten to a point. It usually smooths out into a ball end a few seconds into welding. I'm readying some online stuff. Looks like a need a dedicated wire brush. I was using my regular brush, looks like it was contaminating the material.
 

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Yip get a Stainless Brush and use it only on the ally stuff.

If You were to use a foot control you can up the heat when you start to weld and as the metal takes heat bring it down , works 100% for me but I am still not where I would like to be with my ally welding , practice , practice , practice !! post pics of some of your welds ..........
:bigthumbsup::bigthumbsup::bigthumbsup:
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Ugh, the foot control is $165...

The torch control is pretty easy to use (single finger). I think my issue is just plain ole contamination.
 

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Im not a welder but from my experience with working with welders especially when working aluminum it sounds like you arent cleaning the material enough to completly remove the oxidation from the surface. This oxidation provideds a kind of protective coating that causes exactly what you are describing. Get a dedicated SS brush and make sure to clean the pieces very well right before stricking your arc and you should notice a difference.
 

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The foot control is only 50 for that unit. I highly recommend picking it up for alum as that metal will need you to back of the heat quickly as it heats up. Something that's really tough to do with the hand control while maintaining a good arc. As for the balling that was suggested don't bother. It's an inverter based machine not a transformer based machine which means you can keep the point leaving you better control of your pool. Those 165's do a fantastic job for the price.

Happy welding!
 

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contamanation is your worst enamy for Alum. welding set your argon gas flow to around 15 to 20. make sure the alum is clean..clean..clean... you can simpoly just grind the welding area or buff it clean works best for me then for best results preheat or just use your tig to heat it up make sure you use a green tungston with a ball on the end and welder set on AC (green is pure tungston) tack pieces together and rock and roll and practice practice is the best info good luck
 

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To get a nice ball on the end of pure tungsten set welder on dc electrode negative and weld on steel it will form a perfect ball .Don't sharpen your tip on a grinder used for anything other then tungsten that will contaminate the tungsten.
 

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I have the same machine and was having the same problem. Get the foot control, trust me. I dont remember paying that much for it though. I have seen it on ebay for about $140. Do not use green tungsten in the diversion 165 because it is a squarewave machine. You want to use the orange ceriated tungsten for aluminum and steel as per millers instructions. Sharpen your tungsten to a point. Read your owners manual the Tig handbook by Miller located here. http://www.millerwelds.com/resources/TIGhandbook/ This will tell you everything you need to know.
 

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contamanation is your worst enamy for Alum. welding set your argon gas flow to around 15 to 20. make sure the alum is clean..clean..clean... you can simpoly just grind the welding area or buff it clean works best for me then for best results preheat or just use your tig to heat it up make sure you use a green tungston with a ball on the end and welder set on AC (green is pure tungston) tack pieces together and rock and roll and practice practice is the best info good luck
I have nothing to add!!! What he said!!!
 

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You shouldn't have too much trouble with heat with a thumb control, but rule of thumb (no pun intended) if you can weld immediately you have too much heat.
You should need to hold the arc in one place for a moment or two to get heat up and this also helps with cleaning, one side of the AC curve (positive to negative pulse) creates the heat and the other has a cleaning effect.
Many AC machines allow you to alter the base line on the AC curve to allow more heat or more cleaning.

Cheers
Munchy
 
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