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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm out riding today and I hear an exhaust leak, A BIG ONE. (might I add I just put new gaskets and bolts in the thing) I pull into my parents house and look at the front and the bottom bolt is GONE.... I have some bad luck when it comes to exhaust leaks.
 

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crap like that happens to me life in general. Be glad it's just a bolt. I can imagine how annoyed that made you until you were able to fix the issue.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
It's gone. I always have issues with the front bolts. I don't know if something happened to the threads from the previous owner or what.
 

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2007 Candy Sonoma Red
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Did you happen to put an extra set of exhaust gaskets in? Those bolts thread in a long ways and shouldn't work out that easily if you torque them properly. I just torque mine and don't use lock-tite on them and they've never loosened.
 

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Loctite is only good for about 400 degrees, I would think that it would not hold much.:dontknow:

I am wondering though if the pipes were not seated well before you torqued the bolts, then the pipes vibrate and the bolts would become very loose very quickly. Always seat the pipes then tighten the bolts.
 

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:agree: with Paladin and Zoom, don't loctite them, and if the threads are messed up, drill out, and use a heli-coil insert to repair, in fact I use anti-seize lube on mine, so that I can remove them later without 'pulling' the aluminum threads by accident. Aluminum will seize at hight heat, to the carbon steel bolt, and I'm wondering if maybe this might be the problem now. Book says torque to 16.5 ft/lbs, so don't over do it. FYI .... RRH ... :doorag:
 

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It's always a good idea to re-torque exhaust bolts after a few warm-ups and cool-downs. The heat-cycles will expand and contract the metal, which allows the bolt to back off -- but it should stay put for years after being retorqued once more.

(If it's a bi-metal connection, then the metals also have different expansion rates, which can exacerbate the issue.)
 
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