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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
For those with Air rides, what do you have your pressures at?
Looking for a range of pressures.

Measured the stock shock in the loaded and unloaded state and looks like many other airshocks will work on the bike as long as the weight and pressure don't exceed limits.

Does anybody have high and low specs for any air rides?

Thanks.
 

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Tough to say, since the system does not include a pressure gauge.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
No Guage?

Hmmmm. Just a button to raise and lower then?

Any specs in the manual? I can't find any on the Arnott site.
 

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2007 Candy Sonoma Red
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They both use a very similar compressor, and it's a small high pressure unit. I checked the specs on mine (Kewlmetal) when I got it just in case it needed replaced at some point and it was rated for around 160 psi. I don't recall the brand but they are commonly used in air ride (bagged) suspensions on lowered cars and trucks.

I have tried checking the pressure and it changes a lot. On the Kewlmetal you apply pressure to both sides of the cylinder. Pressure on one side changes the height of the ride, pressure on the other side controls how much damping it has. So you have to adjust the two pressures to get the height and ride combination you want. It takes some experience to get it right without a lot of adjusting, so I played around with the idea of using two gauges to adjust it. I tried just one on the height side and it would go from low pressure to over 200 psi whenever you hit a dip in the road and the dip compressed then unloaded the suspension. I gave up on it after that.

With the Arnott you're just dealing with ride height, so knowing the pressure wouldn't help you much. Just air it to the height you want and go. The damping is a knob on the cylinder and doesn't need adjusted much unless you go from one up to two up or want to stiffen it for a more aggressive ride.

Both just use a switch (Arnott) or switches (KM) to adjust the height, and you can do it on the fly.
 

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Sure they offer one and there is even a port in the manifold for it, but it is not with the system and since any gauge would work, I am not sure why anyone would pay $60 for a part that should cost you $10
 

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Just think of the cool bracket its in & the name painted on the gauge face.;)
 

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Just think of the cool bracket its in & the name painted on the gauge face.;)
Wow! You are right.

The name alone is worth $50.

Imagine if it said HD:eek:
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks.

I would imagine the adjustment knob on the Arnott is just controlling the non pressure side to slow the piston. Like the Kewlmetal one does with the pressure on both sides. Thanks for the info. This helps ALOT. I need to make one bracket for the end of my air cylinder and then some testing.

They both use a very similar compressor, and it's a small high pressure unit. I checked the specs on mine (Kewlmetal) when I got it just in case it needed replaced at some point and it was rated for around 160 psi. I don't recall the brand but they are commonly used in air ride (bagged) suspensions on lowered cars and trucks.

I have tried checking the pressure and it changes a lot. On the Kewlmetal you apply pressure to both sides of the cylinder. Pressure on one side changes the height of the ride, pressure on the other side controls how much damping it has. So you have to adjust the two pressures to get the height and ride combination you want. It takes some experience to get it right without a lot of adjusting, so I played around with the idea of using two gauges to adjust it. I tried just one on the height side and it would go from low pressure to over 200 psi whenever you hit a dip in the road and the dip compressed then unloaded the suspension. I gave up on it after that.

With the Arnott you're just dealing with ride height, so knowing the pressure wouldn't help you much. Just air it to the height you want and go. The damping is a knob on the cylinder and doesn't need adjusted much unless you go from one up to two up or want to stiffen it for a more aggressive ride.

Both just use a switch (Arnott) or switches (KM) to adjust the height, and you can do it on the fly.
 

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I would imagine the adjustment knob on the Arnott is just controlling the non pressure side to slow the piston. Like the Kewlmetal one does with the pressure on both sides. Thanks for the info. This helps ALOT. I need to make one bracket for the end of my air cylinder and then some testing.
The adjustment knob on the Arnott controls the fluid flow in the hydraulic shock, not the air in the bladder. That's actually a better way to do it than trying to balance the air pressure on two sides of a piston to control the dampening.
 

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Sure they offer one and there is even a port in the manifold for it, but it is not with the system and since any gauge would work, I am not sure why anyone would pay $60 for a part that should cost you $10
It comes as a kit, everything you need.I bought one in a chrome bracket that included the fitting for the manifold. I wanted it , so I bought it :dontknow: I did get it through a inside source so I didn't pay that much , but it was still up there.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Makes sense.

That makes sense. I have a new air cylinder coming next week. I hope to control the non pressure size with a valve and allow the air to move in and out under control. I hope it doesn't make a whistling noise. It may all fail completly. But I like a challenge.

The adjustment knob on the Arnott controls the fluid flow in the hydraulic shock, not the air in the bladder. That's actually a better way to do it than trying to balance the air pressure on two sides of a piston to control the dampening.
 
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