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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
i have 2 questions : 1. does anyone run nitrogen in there tires? 2.buudy of mine went to a shop to have dyna beads put in and the guy at the shop said " you can not put those in there cause it doesn't have enough sidewall " wtf? on there site it says nothing about this and even recommends how much to use for which size tire you!
 

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1. does anyone run nitrogen in there tires

i do for more than a year
 

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I have run dynabeads for the past 4k miles or so. MUCH BETTER! The shop is full of crap, they just didn't want to put them in, or don't sell them, so why go along with it?

Oh, and I've been meaning to switch to nitrogen, just having trouble with a source...
 

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#1 - I have it in my Altima because it came that way from the dealer, but my Altima has a tire pressure monitoring system. But I am not running it in my 9 as I check my pressures regularly.

#2 - I have been running dyno beads for 5k and know of member that have had them in for 10k with no issues.
 

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I work for a company that sells nitrogen generators to shops. The big sell on these is NASCAR uses nitrogen in their race tires and it is supposed to handle temp variations better. My only problem is when you need to add pressure to your tire, you have to use nitrogen. They probaly were going to charge you $20.00 per tire to fill w/ nitrogen. I'd stick with air and dyna beads. 8)
 

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I work for a company that sells nitrogen generators to shops. The big sell on these is NASCAR uses nitrogen in their race tires and it is supposed to handle temp variations better. My only problem is when you need to add pressure to your tire, you have to use nitrogen. They probaly were going to charge you $20.00 per tire to fill w/ nitrogen. I'd stick with air and dyna beads. 8)
No, if your running nitrogen and are low on pressure you can use regular air. Preferable to use nitrogen if its available, but no issue mixing the two.
 
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Nitrogen is a larger molicule and therefore doesn't seep through the tire as easily. It is also more stable and expands and contracts less with heat. Nitrogen is also dried to remove moisture reducing corosion and oxidation. Mixing normal air with it is not harmful in any way but it does defeat the purpose of putting nitrogen in in the first place. There is some evidence that tires last longer with it. But it's not enough to be worth paying for it. If you can get it for free (Costco) there is no reason not to except the inconvenience. Some race shopes sell small refilable bottles that could be carried on a bike, either mounted like a nitrous bottle or carried in a saddlebag. But I don't really see the need. It's benefits are very minimal under the perameters of riding our 9's on the street.
 
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A good external ballance is just as effective as the beads. The theory is that as the tire wears the balance changes. the beads can adapt and the external balance has to be redone. In real life the weight that must be ballanced is almost always in the carcus and wheel. Very little change occurs due to rubber wear. But there is some. The draw backs are that the beads break down over time as they beat and bang around, and any moisture or sealants in the tire will make them clump and become a problem. Creating more of an imbalance than you would get with exteral balance changes, even if the weights came off. So its a personal choise. Either will work most of the time. I find it's cheaper to do the external balance because I look for a deal or do it myself. It's easy to do your own static balance. You can buy balance stands or bubble machines, but you don't need them. Just your axel and jackstands or milk crates will work.
 

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The draw backs are that the beads break down over time as they beat and bang around, and any moisture or sealants in the tire will make them clump and become a problem.
Pegasus, I've not seen that happen. I had balancing beads in my stock tires for over 5,000 miles (removed weights and installed them a week or so after getting the bike) and then in a set of E3's for 11,000 miles in the rear and 12,000 miles in the front. It might have been 12,000 and 13,000 miles, I don't recall. But in the rear I even reused most of the beads that were in the original tire, those that didn't escape when I dismounted the tire. They are ceramic and though I can't say they didn't wear down some, there was no evidence of any kind of powder in the tire to indicate it.

I do fully agree that once you put them in you can't use any kind of sealant as it would clump them together and probably create an imbalance in the tire.

I would have reused them in my current set of E3's but capturing them is hardly worth the effort since I buy them by the pound.

As far as using nitrogen in the tires, I've tried it back when you had to pay extra to have it added. I can't say it was worth it, or at least I couldn't justify it. I still had to add air whenever the weather changed seasonally, but maybe not as much. Air contains 78% nitrogen by volume so adding it just dilutes the pure nitrogen to some degree. We use nitrogen generators at work for a hot melt foaming process we use and I've thought about trying it again.
 
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Pegasus, I've not seen that happen. I had balancing beads in my stock tires for over 5,000 miles (removed weights and installed them a week or so after getting the bike) and then in a set of E3's for 11,000 miles in the rear and 12,000 miles in the front. It might have been 12,000 and 13,000 miles, I don't recall. But in the rear I even reused most of the beads that were in the original tire, those that didn't escape when I dismounted the tire. They are ceramic and though I can't say they didn't wear down some, there was no evidence of any kind of powder in the tire to indicate it.

I do fully agree that once you put them in you can't use any kind of sealant as it would clump them together and probably create an imbalance in the tire.

I would have reused them in my current set of E3's but capturing them is hardly worth the effort since I buy them by the pound.

As far as using nitrogen in the tires, I've tried it back when you had to pay extra to have it added. I can't say it was worth it, or at least I couldn't justify it. I still had to add air whenever the weather changed seasonally, but maybe not as much. Air contains 78% nitrogen by volume so adding it just dilutes the pure nitrogen to some degree. We use nitrogen generators at work for a hot melt foaming process we use and I've thought about trying it again.
With the mileage we get from our bike tires it's not so much of a problem. It a car tire after 60K mi I've seen it turn completely to powder. Bth ways work well enough that there is no bad choice.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
thanks for the input fellows! as always when you want good honest answer just ask here!
 
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