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  1. #31
    Very Active Member JUDAH-9's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by slooker View Post
    That looks pretty cool. I'd have to figure out what I'd want on there.
    Did you click on the Color tab, scroll down, and select the white color? The black wheel looks sharp with the white letters.

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  3. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by slooker View Post
    @josey88

    https://www.meancycles.com/store/par...?PartID=229763

    Will that work for the brake line? Since MeanCycles is at least 2 weeks out, I'm ordering directly from MotionPro for the three cables, but they don't have the brake lines as far as I can see.
    That won`t work because you need the 3 brake line pieces .
    My suggestion : Just take a rain check on your trip , order the kit and have it installed , along with the 2" risers . You will have all the time in the world to make the trip after that .
    The sooner you order it , the sooner you will get it .

  4. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by josey088 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by slooker View Post
    @josey88

    https://www.meancycles.com/store/par...?PartID=229763

    Will that work for the brake line? Since MeanCycles is at least 2 weeks out, I'm ordering directly from MotionPro for the three cables, but they don't have the brake lines as far as I can see.
    That won`t work because you need the 3 brake line pieces .
    My suggestion : Just take a rain check on your trip , order the kit and have it installed , along with the 2" risers . You will have all the time in the world to make the trip after that .
    The sooner you order it , the sooner you will get it .
    Well crap. I already ordered the cables from motion pro. I'll keep looking for the brake kit.

    Sadly, it's a monthly trip that I have no control over and have to take a motorcycle.

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  6. #34

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    Quote Originally Posted by josey088 View Post
    You know , if you are not too handy you can take the bike to a motorcycle shop and have the cables installed for a few dollars , It would save you a ton of frustration and many tries . It will also be done right . It will take about 2 hours max . Piece of cake for a bike mech .
    Clutch adjustment correctly is very important so you would not screw up the clutch . Trottle cables are a pain in the ass , too . 1) I would either take the bike to a Suzuki dealer as a first choice to have the risers /cables done or 2) go to a good motorcycle shop .
    If you want to attempt it yourself, get online and watch a few videos , take it easy and go slow .
    The install of the risers is very easy . The cables , well... on the clutch , you need to check the route for the cable and the adjustment after .
    You cut make the installation and save the money and , after that , take it to a shop to have the cables adjusted , trottle and clutch ... this is a good alternative that will save you money and will get the cables adjusted correctly .
    I am forgetting something very, very important : the brake cables will need to be bleed correctly on the two front calipers after replacement of the front cables . That is something that you absolutely have to do correctly in order to have brakes . If you don`t know how to do that , a visit to a shop will be the best option .
    Cheers...

    ps: I myself didn`t know how to do the cables install . I was new to motorcycle mechanics then , years ago , but I had a friend that helped me and it was really not a big deal ... but you have to have someone that knows how to do it .
    Hi Josey, first off, just to clarify something here after reading all these two pages, the brake cables are not cables, they are hydraulic lines. Cables have an external liner usually nylon lined with an internal S/S sliding cable - aka the clutch cable. The Brake lines or hoses are hollow and push brake fluid under high pressure down to the calipers. Secondly, 2 hours at my motorcycle shops equals about AU$200 which I would rather have in my pocket and I love the challenge of learning how to do it myself. Once you have done it the first time, the next time is easy.

    Fitting 2" risers with standard cables
    I just fitted the 2" risers to my bike and it is possible with standard cables and hydraulic brake hoses. The clutch works fine with re-routing (as I'll explain below) but the throttle doesn't look as pretty as it would with 2" extended cables as I had to add a cable tie to the riser to keep it off the tank, however it does work. To stop the throttle sticking on right lock I simply rerouted it from out of the silly coat-hanger and rubber-band to give it more length. However, if you want it to look nice, buy the 2" or 3" longer throttle cables. Maybe the C109R throttle cables are longer as well if the clutch is? That's something I'll be looking into as ordering longer cables in Australia is expensive.

    Clutch Cable Re-route
    Firstly, I removed the headlight and radiator shroud.

    To reroute the clutch cable, undo the 10mm nut and bolt at the lever end. Wind the cable adjuster right into the lever housing, stopping when the slot in the nut and cylinder line up. Pull the lever out about 120 degrees and the cable will come out. You can then undo the ferule on the end of the cable from the lever and remove the cable.

    Lie under the front of the bike on the left-hand side and pull the clutch cable all the way down under the motor. Then feed it back up on the inside of the frame but outside the engine mount bolts.
    Click image for larger version. 

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    Feed it back up to the headlight area and back to the clutch lever. Hook the lever on to the ferrule, hold the lever out at 120 degrees again (the end is pointed towards the headlight) and place the narrow part of the lever back in the slot in the housing where it bolts in. Pull it back around to the grip and it will just pop back in allowing you to put the bolt and nut back in.

    Throttle cables
    The throttle cables are a little bit harder but once you learn the tricks, they are not too bad. You can do it yourself with a basic toolkit.
    First you have to remove the seat, undo the plastic side-covers on either side of the seat (they each have an allen bolt and then push/pull pins into rubber ferrules) and then remove the tank so you can get to the cables on the throttle body on the motor. You undo the rear 12 mm tank bolt, lift the tank and place it on a couple of blocks of wood to hold it up. under the tank is a brown plug you have to squeeze to undo and a fuel line under the tank. This took me a couple of goes, you have to squeeze both sides of the blue tab and then it will slide off. The fitting on the tank obviously has a valve in it as only a few drops come out of the line.

    You then lift the tank at the back and pull it backwards exposing a multi-pin plug at the front. To pull this one apart, you lift the tab (rather than squeeze it) and just pull it apart. Now you can take the tank off and put it as-side. You could probably leave it in place lifted up but I prefer to lift it out of the way rather than damage it.

    Removing the Throttle cables
    I watched a couple of you tube videos and read instructions on this site but they all glossed over the actual steps so here they are in detail.

    I found no matter how hard I tried, I couldn't get the cables off at the Throttle grip. There was just not enough slack even though I backed off the adjuster under the throttle completely and my bike had 30,000km on it.

    Between the two cylinders you will see a throttle body (looks like a carby but no fuel or jets in this). In the middle on the side of this is a disc with a push and pull cable and a nut in the centre. Do not remove this nut!
    You only need to undo the top cable. Take a 10 mm spanner and wind the top fitting bolt on the left up about 5 turns so the fitting winds out towards the front of the bike. You now should be able to pull the cable towards the back of the bike and slide the nut out of the two prongs, releasing the cable. You don't need to remove it completely. This will give you the slack you need for the next bit.

    Now undo the three JIS screws (no they are not Phillips on Japanese motorcycles and cars - but that's another story) under the throttle. Lift the top cover off and turn it 90 degrees to show the cables.
    Wind the lock-nut and adjuster in towards the right-angle fitting to loosen the cable as much as possible. Make sure the bottom section is still locked into the handlebars and can't rotate then pull the right angle fittings down a bit and push them up into the housing. This will loosen the cables a bit more.

    Twist the grip like you are accelerating and use a small pic or screw driver to lift the cable and remove the ferule from the hole. Remove the second cable and your throttle cables are loose.
    Easy!

    Installation is just a reverse of these steps.

    This is how I ran my standard cables with 2" risers. It's not pretty but doesn't hit the tank but I'll chase some longer cables down the track. I just want to get the beast back on the road so I can ride it too work and go for a blast next weekend with the boys.

    Click image for larger version. 

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ID:	389662
    Last edited by edz_M109r; 2 Weeks Ago at 08:25 AM.
    66 Mustang Convertible; DR650

  7. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by edz_M109r View Post
    Hi Josey, first off, just to clarify something here after reading all these two pages, the brake cables are not cables, they are hydraulic lines. Cables have an external liner usually nylon lined with an internal S/S sliding cable - aka the clutch cable. The Brake lines or hoses are hollow and push brake fluid under high pressure down to the calipers. Secondly, 2 hours at my motorcycle shops equals about AU$200 which I would rather have in my pocket and I love the challenge of learning how to do it myself. Once you have done it the first time, the next time is easy.

    Fitting 2" risers with standard cables
    I just fitted the 2" risers to my bike and it is possible with standard cables and hydraulic brake hoses. The clutch works fine with re-routing (as I'll explain below) but the throttle doesn't look as pretty as it would with 2" extended cables as I had to add a cable tie to the riser to keep it off the tank, however it does work. To stop the throttle sticking on right lock I simply rerouted it from out of the silly coat-hanger and rubber-band to give it more length. However, if you want it to look nice, buy the 2" or 3" longer throttle cables. Maybe the C109R throttle cables are longer as well if the clutch is? That's something I'll be looking into as ordering longer cables in Australia is expensive.

    Clutch Cable Re-route
    Firstly, I removed the headlight and radiator shroud.

    To reroute the clutch cable, undo the 10mm nut and bolt at the lever end. Wind the cable adjuster right into the lever housing, stopping when the slot in the nut and cylinder line up. Pull the lever out about 120 degrees and the cable will come out. You can then undo the ferule on the end of the cable from the lever and remove the cable.

    Lie under the front of the bike on the left-hand side and pull the clutch cable all the way down under the motor. Then feed it back up on the inside of the frame but outside the engine mount bolts.
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG-0553-resize.jpg 
Views:	11 
Size:	82.8 KB 
ID:	389660
    Feed it back up to the headlight area and back to the clutch lever. Hook the lever on to the ferrule, hold the lever out at 120 degrees again (the end is pointed towards the headlight) and place the narrow part of the lever back in the slot in the housing where it bolts in. Pull it back around to the grip and it will just pop back in allowing you to put the bolt and nut back in.

    Throttle cables
    The throttle cables are a little bit harder but once you learn the tricks, they are not too bad. You can do it yourself with a basic toolkit.
    First you have to remove the seat, undo the plastic side-covers on either side of the seat (they each have an allen bolt and then push/pull pins into rubber ferrules) and then remove the tank so you can get to the cables on the throttle body on the motor. You undo the rear 12 mm tank bolt, lift the tank and place it on a couple of blocks of wood to hold it up. under the tank is a brown plug you have to squeeze to undo and a fuel line under the tank. This took me a couple of goes, you have to squeeze both sides of the blue tab and then it will slide off. The fitting on the tank obviously has a valve in it as only a few drops come out of the line.

    You then lift the tank at the back and pull it backwards exposing a multi-pin plug at the front. To pull this one apart, you lift the tab (rather than squeeze it) and just pull it apart. Now you can take the tank off and put it as-side. You could probably leave it in place lifted up but I prefer to lift it out of the way rather than damage it.

    Removing the Throttle cables
    I watched a couple of you tube videos and read instructions on this site but they all glossed over the actual steps so here they are in detail.

    I found no matter how hard I tried, I couldn't get the cables off at the Throttle grip. There was just not enough slack even though I backed off the adjuster under the throttle completely and my bike had 30,000km on it.

    Between the two cylinders you will see a throttle body (looks like a carby but no fuel or jets in this). In the middle on the side of this is a disc with a push and pull cable and a nut in the centre. Do not remove this nut!
    You only need to undo the top cable. Take a 10 mm spanner and wind the top fitting bolt on the left up about 5 turns so the fitting winds out towards the front of the bike. You now should be able to pull the cable towards the back of the bike and slide the nut out of the two prongs, releasing the cable. You don't need to remove it completely. This will give you the slack you need for the next bit.

    Now undo the three JIS screws (no they are not Phillips on Japanese motorcycles and cars - but that's another story) under the throttle. Lift the top cover off and turn it 90 degrees to show the cables.
    Wind the lock-nut and adjuster in towards the right-angle fitting to loosen the cable as much as possible. Make sure the bottom section is still locked into the handlebars and can't rotate then pull the right angle fittings down a bit and push them up into the housing. This will loosen the cables a bit more.

    Twist the grip like you are accelerating and use a small pic or screw driver to lift the cable and remove the ferule from the hole. Remove the second cable and your throttle cables are loose.
    Easy!

    Installation is just a reverse of these steps.

    This is how I ran my standard cables with 2" risers. It's not pretty but doesn't hit the tank but I'll chase some longer cables down the track. I just want to get the beast back on the road so I can ride it too work and go for a blast next weekend with the boys.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG-0555-s.jpg 
Views:	11 
Size:	105.5 KB 
ID:	389662
    I referred to the whole package as cables since we all know what are we talking about . I and everybody else here knows that the brake cables are hollow tubes that carry the hydraulic fluid ... there are no mentally retarded people here on the forum , as far as I can tell .
    As per the installation of the standard length "cables" following the install of 2" risers , it can be done but it would look crappy (well, to me at least) .
    I never said it cut not be done .
    The replacement of cables with extra long ones is your choice since it is your bike and I would not criticize someone else`s choice on their own bike ... nor do I care either .
    The op was asking some questions and I was simply answering them based on my own experience for that job and I gave some suggestions with the absolute best intentions .
    Have a wonderful day
    Last edited by josey088; 2 Weeks Ago at 03:46 PM.

  8. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by josey088 View Post
    I referred to the whole package as cables since we all know what are we talking about . I and everybody else here knows that the brake cables are hollow tubes that carry the hydraulic fluid ... there are no mentally retarded people here on the forum , as far as I can tell .
    As per the installation of the standard length "cables" following the install of 2" risers , it can be done but it would look crappy (well, to me at least) .
    I never said it cut not be done .
    The replacement of cables with extra long ones is your choice since it is your bike and I would not criticize someone else`s choice on their own bike ... nor do I care either .
    The op was asking some questions and I was simply answering them based on my own experience for that job and I gave some suggestions with the absolute best intentions .
    Have a wonderful day
    I ended up ordering all the new cables AND hoses, and the new risers will be here about the same time. I don't have someone knowledgeable about bikes helping me, so I'll probably have a shop do it for now.

    I'll post pictures once I've got it done.

    I appreciate all your guys' help.

  9. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by slooker View Post
    That looks pretty cool. I'd have to figure out what I'd want on there.
    Since this bike is often referred to as the “BEAST” perhaps you should go with a design of an animal that comes to your mind, when you think of the word/name beast. I went a design of a Lion’s head cut into my Derby Cover, because it holds a two-fold meaning for me. If you go to my album, and look at my Crushed Chrome M109R with the two black rally stripes, you’ll see a side-profile pic of the bike, depicting the chrome Derby Cover with the Lion’s head design/cutout.

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