How would you fix this tank dent?
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Thread: How would you fix this tank dent?

  1. #1
    Very Active Member LoBlo's Avatar
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    Default How would you fix this tank dent?

    So I dropped my bike a few months ago. Low speed, just slipped on some gravel and I'm fine. The guards did an ok job but the shifter is bent and needs to be replaced and there's a eye sore of a dent on the left side of the tank. The front cowl got scraped as well. Here's some pictures.

    So how would you guys go about fixing the dent? A new tank is way too pricey for me.

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    Also, for the cowl, I was just going to find a good paint guy and have him sand it down and repaint it. Probably some black gloss paint for the clutch handle. Think that will work?

    LB

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    Very Active Member JUDAH-9's Avatar
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    LB, I honestly would replace the tank. With a dent that size, you run the risk of the protective coating on the inside of the tank to have been cracked, which will then begin to crumble, and eventually start rusting the inside of the tank. At that point, the rust will contaminate and subsequently destroy your fuel system and along with your fuel components. My advice is...Donít take shortcuts with your bike, because sometimes those shortcuts will create bigger and/or worse problems.
    Last edited by JUDAH-9; 2 Weeks Ago at 04:58 AM.

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    Radio Active Member rynosback's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JUDAH-9 View Post
    LB, I honestly would replace the tank. With a dent that size, you run the risk of the protective coating on the inside of the tank to have been cracked, which will then begin to crumble, and eventually start rusting the inside of the tank. At that point, the rust will contaminate and subsequently destroy your fuel system and along with your fuel components. My advice is...Donít tank shortcuts with your bike, because sometimes those shortcuts will create bigger and/or worse problems.
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  6. #4
    Very Active Member LoBlo's Avatar
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    Meh. Ok, I know good advice when I hear it. New tank it is.

    The thing that hurts the most about a bike drop isn't the the pride or embarrassment of the bike dents.... its the giant dent out that you know is going to come out of your wallet that hurts the most!!!

  7. #5
    Very Active Member DutchM1800R2's Avatar
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    About those dents, both in the tank and your wallet..

    I agree with the guys above about having the inside of your tanked checked before having it fixed.
    If you go for a new tank, take some time checking for prices. Online they seem to range between $750-$860 for your colour, and a dealer may likely ask for more.

    Thereís a new tank in your colour on eBay for $550, but thatís in Europe so youíll need to check shipping and customs. Also, it will have ĎIntruderí on there i.s.o ĎBoulevardí.

  8. #6
    Very Active Member Mrtallguy67's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LoBlo View Post
    Meh. Ok, I know good advice when I hear it. New tank it is.

    The thing that hurts the most about a bike drop isn't the the pride or embarrassment of the bike dents.... its the giant dent out that you know is going to come out of your wallet that hurts the most!!!


    Do yo have insurance on the bike? I know when I laid mine down it didn't have any paint work needed and no dents to repair, however insurance still paid out over 5k for the repairs. I went down on the exhaust side and the exhaust, crash bars, foot rest/brake and handle bar ends took the brunt of it. Either way, insurance just pulled my deductible out of the payout and I still had plenty of cash left to fix the bike. Also, no rate increase as its only a recreational vehicle. I would not hesitate to go that route again over trying to piece it together to save money. just my .02.

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    Very Active Member JUDAH-9's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mrtallguy67 View Post
    Do yo have insurance on the bike? I know when I laid mine down it didn't have any paint work needed and no dents to repair, however insurance still paid out over 5k for the repairs. I went down on the exhaust side and the exhaust, crash bars, foot rest/brake and handle bar ends took the brunt of it. Either way, insurance just pulled my deductible out of the payout and I still had plenty of cash left to fix the bike. Also, no rate increase as its only a recreational vehicle. I would not hesitate to go that route again over trying to piece it together to save money. just my .02.
    Thatís GREAT advice Bro. You bring up a very good point/option. It would be best to use his insurance to cover the cost. Most Motorcycle Insurance Companies pay for OEM replacement parts vs repairs, which would help LB to put his bike back to the exact condition it was in, or possibly even go with some aftermarket upgrades. The aftermarket upgrade parts are generally less expensive than the OEM parts.

    LB, I hope you havenít waited too long to report the incident to your insurance company. You should pursue that avenue, and see how it all pans out. It may turn out just fine, or possibly even better than you expect.

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    Very Active Member cbxer55's Avatar
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    So these bikes have a protective coating on the inside of the tank? Must be clear, because the inside of the tank looks like natural metal to me. Honestly, I've never had a problem with unprotected tanks rusting on the inside. Just keep the tank full, no rust.
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  11. #9
    Very Active Member JUDAH-9's Avatar
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    Yes, the 9 does have a protective coating on the inside of the tank. Iíd be willing to bet that many other bike manufacturers are doing the same thing, as bike concepts and overall quality has evolved greatly over the last 3 decades.

    Many years ago, around the mid 80s to early 90s, and before the birth of fuel injected bikes, I vaguely remember having some friends and/or knowing of a few guys who complained about their fuel tanks having rusted on the inside. It led to a plethora of fuel related problems and problems with their carbureted motors. It was especially problematic when guys stored their bikes for the winter, but failed to fill their tanks with fuel and some sort of fuel additive to preserve the fuel and help protect the inside of the tank...such as Marvel Mystery Oil. Although it is wise to stick with those same protective measures today, having that protective coating inside the tank helps to preserve the tank, even if someone failed to fill their tank with fuel, and add a product like MMO. I donít know how many consecutive times one could get away with failing to do that, bit Iím sure some do.

  12. #10
    Very Active Member cbxer55's Avatar
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    I go through gallon bottles of MMO. Several a year. I keep four of the one quart bottles in the garage, and fill them from the one gallon bottles. The quart bottles are measured in four ounce increments on the bottles side. So very easy to keep a pretty exact amount in the tank. And they have easy pour spouts. But hey, I know from recently, that you are a recent convert to using it.

    Years ago, a friend trailered an 83 Kawasaki GPZ 1100 to my house in Commiefornia. Wouldn't run or start. Opened the tank to find it almost completely rust. Found and removed the fuel filter and it was totally filled with it. Ugliest sight I've ever seen. He bought a new filter, but to get it running I back flushed the original filter til it was clean. I bought two gallon bottles of MMO and poured them in the tank. Put the cap on and sloshed it around real good, poured out the MMO. It was ugly. But I was able to strain it and get the bigger particles out. Then poured it back in and sloshed it good again. Kept doing this til the tank was clean. Two more fresh bottles and did it several more times. When done, I couldn't tell it had been rusty. Put the filter back on in it's proper orientation (it had been installed backwards by some jackwad in the past, not my friend. He had only recently bought the bike). Filled the tank with gas and took it for a ride. Went out to Willow Springs / Tehachapi Mountain Road, which is about ten miles long and straight as an arrow, with no side roads hitting it, and slightly downhill for five miles or so, then slightly uphill for the last five. Only real danger on that road is BIG ass jack wabbits. Laid on the tank and took it past 150 mph. First time I'd ever been that fast on a bike.

    When he cam and picked it up, I put the new filter on. Then told him, "from this point on, keep the damn tank full, and you'll never have this problem again." We're still friends, even though I'm in Oklahoma and he's still in commiefornia. He still lives by what I told him. He even uses MMO himself.
    Last edited by cbxer55; 2 Weeks Ago at 03:35 PM.
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  13. #11
    Very Active Member JUDAH-9's Avatar
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    Yes, I did convert to MMO some time in 2019, and Iím thankful to all of you who convinced me to do so. That product is phenomenal, tried, and true. Many of the guys at various local auto parts stores have spoken very highly of it, stating they have been using the product for as far back as they can remember...with nothing but great results. I now add 4 ounces of MMO to every other fuel up on each of my four bikes.

  14. #12
    Very Active Member cbxer55's Avatar
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    I started using it way back in the late 70's / early 80's. Some old guy I worked with had a hot rod, and he had this MMO bottle mounted on the firewall with lines plumbed into the vacuum lines on the carburetor. Back then, you could buy that set up from MMO. I still think it's better mixed in the gas, especially nowadays with fuel pumps submerged in the tank. So it gets to lube things that would normally never get lubed. I typically use it at a ratio of one ounce per gallon. But sometimes, I get lazy and slack off for a tank or two. So all said and done, about the same as you.
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    Very Active Member VzrDean1800's Avatar
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    If you do buy a replacement tank, before you send the old one to the metal recycler, pour some water in it and let it sit for a few days. See if it starts to rust. I'm curious if our tanks do have a lining or coating in them.
    Dean

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    Active Member Puckman77's Avatar
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    I bought a new 2017 BOSS the same grey as OP. Two weeks into ownership I parked slightly downhill while waiting for buddy to gas up, slowly rolled off kickstand onto some paver blocks and got a similar dent. I couldn't find any non-Cali tanks at either Bike Bandit or SuzukiParts.com so had to buy a Cali tank, with a new cap and key, then ran a short length of fuel line from the vent port under the rear of the tank down to the left side passenger peg attachment hole (pegs removed), capped the hose and then drilled a small hole in the end of the cap to allow for two way air flow.
    It's been working great for two plus years now and only get small amount of gas drippage after a hot days ride. How much gas evaporates is another story, but the hole is large enough to keep the tank equalized with outside pressure. I was going to buy a non-Cali tank if/when they became available but I think I'm leaving well enough alone. My original tank sits in the garage with a dent!

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    Very Active Member JUDAH-9's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Puckman77 View Post
    I bought a new 2017 BOSS the same grey as OP. Two weeks into ownership I parked slightly downhill while waiting for buddy to gas up, slowly rolled off kickstand onto some paver blocks and got a similar dent. I couldn't find any non-Cali tanks at either Bike Bandit or SuzukiParts.com so had to buy a Cali tank, with a new cap and key, then ran a short length of fuel line from the vent port under the rear of the tank down to the left side passenger peg attachment hole (pegs removed), capped the hose and then drilled a small hole in the end of the cap to allow for two way air flow.
    It's been working great for two plus years now and only get small amount of gas drippage after a hot days ride. How much gas evaporates is another story, but the hole is large enough to keep the tank equalized with outside pressure. I was going to buy a non-Cali tank if/when they became available but I think I'm leaving well enough alone. My original tank sits in the garage with a dent!
    Wow! Your response above took me totally by surprise, and left me slightly in a state of disbelief. Perhaps due to my lack of knowledge, I canít imagine how purposely creating a fuel leakage on your bike would be wise and/or safe. Personally, I wouldíve purchased a brand new tank, or waited until I found a non-Cali tank, rather than purposely having fuel leak from my bike, or trying to repair a dented tank. There very well may be no issues with what youíve done, but I just couldnít imagine doing that to my bikes...primarily from a safety perspective.

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    Active Member Puckman77's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JUDAH-9 View Post
    Wow! Your response above took me totally by surprise, and left me slightly in a state of disbelief. Perhaps due to my lack of knowledge, I canít imagine how purposely creating a fuel leakage on your bike would be wise and/or safe. Personally, I wouldíve purchased a brand new tank, or waited until I found a non-Cali tank, rather than purposely having fuel leak from my bike, or trying to repair a dented tank. There very well may be no issues with what youíve done, but I just couldnít imagine doing that to my bikes...primarily from a safety perspective.
    JUDAH, you are correct that this setup is not optimal. That said, I stole it from the Cali guys who install air rides in their nines. The compressor goes where the CARB required vapor recovery system is installed, leaving them no choice but to find another way to keep the tank from over pressurizing or collapsing under vacuum. The normal tank cap has a built in pressure relief/vent that burps the pressure build up from the tank getting hot while riding. The Cali cap has no relief/vent built in because they require the vapor recovery system which pumps the vapors right back into the intake. A Cali cap only fits a Cali tank and same thing for the non-Cali setup. If the gas volume depletion rate while riding is less than the pressure build up from gas vaporization (as is the case when taking a break on a hot day) then the tank cap relieves this pressure directly into the atmosphere (big no-no in Cali). In the other direction, when you shut down for the night and everything cools, the vacuum created by the gas condensing is broken by the cap venting and allowing air into the tank to make up the volume and prevent tank collapse. I capped my fuel line and drilled a hole to best approximate the relief/vent capacity of the non-Cali cap. If I ran the hose under the tank and up to the triple tree to get the end higher, then I would prevent the spotting I get now from condensing vapors dripping out the hose via gravity. BUT, I might have other issues that are worse. I might search for a small spring loaded vent/relief that I could fit to the end of the hose that would exactly mimic the non-Cali cap, but I would want it to not be so ugly. If I didn't tell you I had this rig, you'd be hard pressed to recognize it on the bike.

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    Very Active Member JUDAH-9's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Puckman77 View Post
    JUDAH, you are correct that this setup is not optimal. That said, I stole it from the Cali guys who install air rides in their nines. The compressor goes where the CARB required vapor recovery system is installed, leaving them no choice but to find another way to keep the tank from over pressurizing or collapsing under vacuum. The normal tank cap has a built in pressure relief/vent that burps the pressure build up from the tank getting hot while riding. The Cali cap has no relief/vent built in because they require the vapor recovery system which pumps the vapors right back into the intake. A Cali cap only fits a Cali tank and same thing for the non-Cali setup. If the gas volume depletion rate while riding is less than the pressure build up from gas vaporization (as is the case when taking a break on a hot day) then the tank cap relieves this pressure directly into the atmosphere (big no-no in Cali). In the other direction, when you shut down for the night and everything cools, the vacuum created by the gas condensing is broken by the cap venting and allowing air into the tank to make up the volume and prevent tank collapse. I capped my fuel line and drilled a hole to best approximate the relief/vent capacity of the non-Cali cap. If I ran the hose under the tank and up to the triple tree to get the end higher, then I would prevent the spotting I get now from condensing vapors dripping out the hose via gravity. BUT, I might have other issues that are worse. I might search for a small spring loaded vent/relief that I could fit to the end of the hose that would exactly mimic the non-Cali cap, but I would want it to not be so ugly. If I didn't tell you I had this rig, you'd be hard pressed to recognize it on the bike.
    Thanks for that eloquent explanation Puckman. I really appreciate that. What you said was clearly and very-well stated. I now have a much better understanding of what you did and why.

    Thanks again,
    Bobby 😎👍👍👍😎

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    Very Active Member LoBlo's Avatar
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    So I looked up the cost of a new tank and its surprisingly cheaper than when I looked a few months ago. Must be a surplus in the Suzuki warehouses. Got the new tank in and am in the mist of transferring the fuel pumps, etc over.

    LB

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    Very Active Member JUDAH-9's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LoBlo View Post
    So I looked up the cost of a new tank and its surprisingly cheaper than when I looked a few months ago. Must be a surplus in the Suzuki warehouses. Got the new tank in and am in the mist of transferring the fuel pumps, etc over.

    LB
    I happy to hear itís working out for you LB.😁👍👍👍😁

    Iím certain you made the right decision, rather than trying to repair the damaged tank.

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