Anyone change their own tires? How bad is the rear to do?
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Thread: Anyone change their own tires? How bad is the rear to do?

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    Default Anyone change their own tires? How bad is the rear to do?

    I'm coming up on my first tire change on the 9. On my ADV bikes I've always done my own. I have a Motion Pro beadbreaker, spoons, rim protectors, balancer, etc. But not a proper tire changing station. Just wondering how hard this big rear tire is to do with "home" tools. I don't mind paying to have it done, but want to tear it down to put moly on the driveshaft splines anyway, figure that once I'm in that deep I might as well try the tire. Thanks in advance.

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    Very Active Member Tazdvl's Avatar
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    Default Anyone change their own tires? How bad is the rear to do?

    Quote Originally Posted by IdahoRenegade View Post
    I'm coming up on my first tire change on the 9. On my ADV bikes I've always done my own. I have a Motion Pro beadbreaker, spoons, rim protectors, balancer, etc. But not a proper tire changing station. Just wondering how hard this big rear tire is to do with "home" tools. I don't mind paying to have it done, but want to tear it down to put moly on the driveshaft splines anyway, figure that once I'm in that deep I might as well try the tire. Thanks in advance.
    My personal experience...all $.02 worth!

    I change my rear tire only once, the first time. Removing the original tire was a breeze. Used 2x4s under the hitch on my pickup truck to create a fulcrum to break the beads. Used my spoons and rim protectors to remove the tire, and never broke a sweat!

    Then I tried to install the new tire. I put soapy water in the beads, slipped the first bead over with no effort at all. An hour later, my wife came out to the garage to find out if there was a trucker and a sailor having a swearing contest!

    Basically,I needed 3 hands, the strength of a silver back gorilla, the dexterity of a surgeon, and a hyperactive spider monkey on speed!

    I settled for my wife putting all of her weight on one of the spoons while I used the other two spoons to work the rest of the tire on to the rim. Setting the beads was easy. I installed a Dunlop 250, and the beads pretty much set themselves.

    I have since used a local motorcycle shop to change my last set of tires. If I bring my own tires, they charge me $50 per tire to mount and balance them. For my next set, I will probably just purchase the tires from the shop, as they offered to match any online sale price I find.

    Long story....sorry. Just my way of saying, no, I won't do it with spoons again!!

    BTW, the spider monkey doesn't help change the tire, but he sure is fun to watch!! Lol!

    Taz
    ----------------------------------
    Taz
    ----------------------------------
    2012 Suzuki Boulevard M109R

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    Very Active Member Bering_C_Sparky's Avatar
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    ^^^^^^That's some funny **** there.

    BCS

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    Very Active Member cbxer55's Avatar
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    Used to change my own back in the day when a "fat" rear tire was a 130. Not a problem. Last time I did one, a friend had a Suzuki cruiser with a 180 on the back. Never again!
    SILVER 2006 M109R.
    BLACK 2008 B-KING


  8. #6
    Very Active Member BIG MIKE 109R's Avatar
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    I take my wheel to my local dealer to install the new tire for $25 per wheel.
    Last edited by BIG MIKE 109R; 1 Week Ago at 11:24 AM.

    JESUS IS LORD! 2008 Candy Max Orange Debeavered, Yana Shiki 2" bones, Grasshopper backrest, V&H Big Shots, Dunlop Elite-3 250 rear, Dunlop D251 150 front, LED brake lights, micro brite rear turn signals, Arlen Ness billet chrome grips, smoothie rear fender, ATRE, Wolo horn, Scorp motor mounts, Gel seat, Chrome M109R derby cover, A&R 6K HID.
    I fly low, those who fly low, fly long! BIG MIKE

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    Very Active Member VzrDean1800's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tazdvl View Post
    My personal experience...all $.02 worth!

    I change my rear tire only once, the first time. Removing the original tire was a breeze. Used 2x4s under the hitch on my pickup truck to create a fulcrum to break the beads. Used my spoons and rim protectors to remove the tire, and never broke a sweat!

    Then I tried to install the new tire. I put soapy water in the beads, slipped the first bead over with no effort at all. An hour later, my wife came out to the garage to find out if there was a trucker and a sailor having a swearing contest!

    Basically,I needed 3 hands, the strength of a silver back gorilla, the dexterity of a surgeon, and a hyperactive spider monkey on speed!

    I settled for my wife putting all of her weight on one of the spoons while I used the other two spoons to work the rest of the tire on to the rim. Setting the beads was easy. I installed a Dunlop 250, and the beads pretty much set themselves.

    I have since used a local motorcycle shop to change my last set of tires. If I bring my own tires, they charge me $50 per tire to mount and balance them. For my next set, I will probably just purchase the tires from the shop, as they offered to match any online sale price I find.

    Long story....sorry. Just my way of saying, no, I won't do it with spoons again!!

    BTW, the spider monkey doesn't help change the tire, but he sure is fun to watch!! Lol!

    Taz
    This pretty much describes my experience doing the rear on the M109. I change the tires on my sons FZ09 without any trouble at all. But never ever again on the 109.

  10. #8
    Very Active Member Big-B's Avatar
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    Been doing my own for years. I use a harbor freight tire changer. No issues. Some times an extra hand helps, but can be done by yourself. I have a no mar bar, spoons and rim protectors so I don't **** up my chrome wheels. Soapy solution can also aid you in removing and installing the tires. I also use the bead seating clamps to keep the tire from "walking" when trying to install the new ones.


    IT'S NOT ABOUT HOW FAST YOU GET THERE, IT'S ABOUT THE RIDE ITSELF. TAKE YOUR TIME AND ENJOY IT!!

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