M109r.... new rider
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  1. #1
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    Question M109r.... new rider

    I'm probably about 5'9 250lbs, I've rode a few dirt bikes here and there... new to street bikes. I've always loved the m109r before I could even drive a car legally lol. You guys think that's too much bike for someone as their first? Open to all opinions/recommendations.

    Sidenote: I'm 22 years old
    Last edited by MittenBoy; 1 Week Ago at 02:05 PM.

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    Very Active Member 60ratrod's Avatar
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    if you haven't gotten it already, then yes. if you went ahead and gotten it, be careful and respect the power. if you haven't gotten it, then look into getting the m50. similar style, just less power and displacement. the m109r is absurdly powerful, and not a great match for a street beginner.
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    Very Active Member thevili's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MittenBoy View Post
    I'm probably about 5'9 250lbs, I've rode a few dirt bikes here and there... new to street bikes. I've always loved the m109r before I could even drive a car legally lol. You guys think that's too much bike for someone as their first? Open to all opinions/recommendations.
    I got my bike lic. at the age of 53, never rode the motorcycle before....first bike- Honda vtx1300C, not much lighter then M109R,. within a year I upgraded to this one... I think, if you want one badly, get it! Just make sure it is not too heavy for you to maneuver when parking.. To be extra respectful of it at the beginning is a must,.. then the rest comes natural... JMHO...
    M109R 2011 Black, 2" lowering bones, air horn, flash to pass garage door opener, Brakeaway Cruise Control, V-stream windshield, Back Off Brake hold, OEM engine guards, Cobra One Piece rear luggage carrier, Cobra Tri Pro 2 in 1 Black exhaust, Cobra FI 2000 AT fuel processor.

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    Very Active Member biker-chicky's Avatar
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    Welcome to your future addiction!

    You know how to operate a bike, your a sizeable guy, you love it, as long as you have some self control and can spend some time with slow riding practice, this bike will be sure to please. It's easy to Ride at speed; it's the slow ride that's a bit of a challenge. as far as I recall as a new rider, who graduated self to the heavy bike over approxamatly 3 years, and I'm an old girl, 5'5 and 170 pounds, if I can handle the monster I have a good feeling you may as well. It's a different bike, very sensitive throttle. I can let out my clutch and move at a snails pace without tipping over or feet on the ground with no throttle, been like that since new. I have a 2006


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    Very Active Member Stillfree's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by biker-chicky View Post
    Welcome to your future addiction!

    You know how to operate a bike, your a sizeable guy, you love it, as long as you have some self control and can spend some time with slow riding practice, this bike will be sure to please. It's easy to Ride at speed; it's the slow ride that's a bit of a challenge. as far as I recall as a new rider, who graduated self to the heavy bike over approxamatly 3 years, and I'm an old girl, 5'5 and 170 pounds, if I can handle the monster I have a good feeling you may as well. It's a different bike, very sensitive throttle. I can let out my clutch and move at a snails pace without tipping over or feet on the ground with no throttle, been like that since new. I have a 2006


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    I think everyone is different some r natural riders and others struggle along but eventually become skilled riders in time - i started riding at 60 yrs old and my first bike was a vulcan 500 cc . In 2.5 years I went from the 500cc to a m50 then a m90 and finally a m109R. As i graduated from bike to bike I found each new bigger bike easier to ride compared to the last bike. The bigger the bike it seemed to me the better the balance was. U just have to remember the M109R is abt 800 lbs and once it starts to fall chances r u won't be able to stop it - always park it in gear and be careful that it is on a good tilt when its on the stand. Once ur cruising it feels like u've been on it for years. Enjoy it but respect the power !

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    Quote Originally Posted by biker-chicky View Post
    Welcome to your future addiction!

    You know how to operate a bike, your a sizeable guy, you love it, as long as you have some self control and can spend some time with slow riding practice, this bike will be sure to please. It's easy to Ride at speed; it's the slow ride that's a bit of a challenge. as far as I recall as a new rider, who graduated self to the heavy bike over approxamatly 3 years, and I'm an old girl, 5'5 and 170 pounds, if I can handle the monster I have a good feeling you may as well. It's a different bike, very sensitive throttle. I can let out my clutch and move at a snails pace without tipping over or feet on the ground with no throttle, been like that since new. I have a 2006


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    Great advice, and I agree 100%. To the OP, some very important things to consider here are...

    1. You do have some riding experience.

    2. You MUST respect the M109R and it's power at all times.

    3. You MUST take your time becoming familiar with the characteristics and operation of the 9.

    4. You obviously love the appeal of the 9, and have wanted one for some time.

    5. If you buy something else now, you'll likely be wasting money, because you're real interest is in the M109R, and you'll probably regret it, if you don't get what you want now.

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    Very Active Member Stavros's Avatar
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    Good points by all..my first bike was my 9... Definatley a handful,but if you respect its power and weight,it can be done..if you are a hotdog on it without proper experiance,you will get hurt..I didn't want to buy a small bike knowing this is what I wanted,and take multiple losses moving up from a small bike to the bigger ones.no regrets

    get it and be careful,take your time
    Last edited by Stavros; 1 Week Ago at 03:43 PM.
    Stav

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    All good advise just remember it is you that is in control the bike will only do as you ask just be careful

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    Very Active Member stormiezzz's Avatar
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    Get the 9 now. Don't start off small. You will regret it. Go for your dream bike and take the plunge. Just listen to all the advice given above. I cannot over emphasize the importance of what has been said before me. That been said, I hope you have a thick wallet. Most of us like to mod our bikes to our liking. That costs a bit.
    "RIDE IT LIKE YOU STOLE IT"

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    Very Active Member Latinrascal's Avatar
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    If you're ridden the big cc dirtbikes with a paddle wheel then you know what the 109 pulls like when you get on the throttle. Bike is well balanced and carries much of its weight on the low side so it's not as top heavy as say compared to the vtx1800. Your not a small guy and should have no problem controlling this bike. I predict if you buy the m90 you will be trading it in by end of riding season for the 109.

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    Very Active Member Bobby1048's Avatar
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    Default m109.... new rider

    Everyone here has some awesome responses to to your post. My suggestion would be if you want it get it, just don't settle. If you're buying it get what you want. Secondly, as biker-chicky (and others) have stated respect the machine it will turn on you in a heartbeat if you are not respectful to it. Not to bore you (or anyone else for that matter) I have been riding off and on for 40 years, and yes I'm that old, my last bike was an '02 Goldwing same displacement as the 109. I have had "Sally" since March 9th it took a week or two to get accustomed to how she behaves. Now I'm so comfortable taking her out and about. Spring in Ohio is not to conducive to everyday riding. RESPECT the machine. Keep the dirty side down. Bob
    U. S. Army Retired I was in Aviation now I can fly low and fast. If only the "9" had wings.......

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    Very Active Member Champ1's Avatar
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    The only person that can determine if the 9 is a good first bike is you...your level of common sense and maturity is what will dictate the right first bike. Bear in mind it is a heavy bike with a LOT of torque and power...my so what point is....yes going down doing something stupid or making a rookie mistake will likely injure you seriously, but the weight and mass of the bike is also capable of causing serious injury to others around you even if they are in a car. If I had this bike when I was 22 the carnage would have been horrific.
    the probability of being watched is directly proportional to the stupidity of your act

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    The age issue is a very good point Champ. Most 22 year old males are still very immature and somewhat irresponsible, in terms of making sound, spur-of-the-moment decisions, such as "should or shouldn't I try to impress my friends and onlookers by doing careless stunts, or trying to ride beyond my riding skills and experiences." Usually, the outcome of those scenarios are not very good. The M109R is not the bike for anyone with an immature mindset. It would've not been good for me to have an M109R when I was just 22 years old. I was far too ****y and extremely over-confident in my abilities, and I would've possibly hurt myself, and others on the beast this M109R is.

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    Very Active Member Poseidon's Avatar
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    I agree with the age comments... But then again, other than the weight of the bike and the muscle it takes to control it, what situation is he going to get himself into that he couldn't do on a liter bike? The age and responsibility of the rider is what is important for riding in general. More a question of should he be on a bike at all. If so, I see no issue with getting a 9 as a first bike. Plenty of others have done it. My advice is to #1, TAKE THE MSF COURSE!!!! Then, practice not only slow speed maneuvers, but more importantly the evasive maneuvers and emergency braking. The 9 is a Beast and definitely is NOT as nimble as a sport bike, adventure bike, or even the dirt bikes you have been on are.

    Make sure you also understand that the price you pay for the M109R is only a down payment. The real money it will cost you is in the mods you do!!!! $100 here... $300 there... next thing you know, you've exceeded the MSRP of a new bike in mods!

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    ^^^^^...Very, very, very well stated P.

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    Very Active Member Stillfree's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JUDAH-9 View Post
    ^^^^^...Very, very, very well stated P.
    Personally I think the biggest concern for me on a large extremely fast bike is speed vs braking distance . I have almost ****e my pants a few times in fear that I never gauged my breaking distance properly based on my speed to stop b4 hitting the car in front of me. I have also fish tailed a few times trying to stop b4 hitting a car in front of me. U need to always keep a very safe distance between u and other vehicles based on ur speed , road surfaces , weather and driver errors . This bike is so powerfully fast that b4 u open it up you need a lot of space to come to a safe stop.

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    Last edited by Stillfree; 1 Week Ago at 08:20 AM.

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    Very Active Member blacklightning's Avatar
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    I got my first bike for my 40th birthday gift to myself. It was a 97 yamaha fzr600. In my opinion a 600cc+ sport bike is more dangerous than the M109. I say that because the power is more unpredictable and can get away faster. Within 6 months I moved on to the M109, and it was perfect. I think the weight and handling is the biggest factors. The power is there, but it is not overwelming. I say, get the bike.
    Now, if you were looking at a zx14 or hayabusa, I might have a different opinion, but the M109 is just fine.

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    I agree with those who said to go with the M109R. And I also agree that you should take a MSF riding course or two. If you are somewhat responsible, you should be OK riding the bike once you've taken the course(s) and have practiced maneuvering and street riding. The problem with any bike is that it can take you into turns much faster than it should and the results can be disastrous. But the biggest factor will be how you deal with crazy, disrespectful, hateful, and oblivious drivers. These are the biggest problem to motorcyclists, since four wheel vehicles always win in a crash with a motorcycle. Riding a motorcycle is much different than driving a car.

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    Very Active Member QZephyr's Avatar
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    I didn't start with the 9, and when I first saw one, I knew I shouldn't. In order to get my now ex wife into riding, we bought a pair of Burgman 400's. I got a used M50 a couple years after and then 2 years after, the 9. I could have done the 9 shortly after I got the M50, but I didn't have the money at the time. I had already test rode one. Seriously, none of us can actually tell you what to do. This bike is heavy in slow corners and no one is exaggerating when we say it has a lot of power. There are similar and larger displacement bikes that don't come close to the power of the 9. The first time I opened the throttle after getting mine, I threw my left arm right behind me. I also let the clutch out to quickly on a slow turn and had to set it down as it killed. Two people helped me lift it back up. Neither happened again, but it could have been worse for me, if this would have been my first bike. Make a smart decision and be safe with whatever you decide.

    When you do things right, people won't be sure you did anything at all.

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    I grew up riding dirtbikes. Bought a street legal xr400 and rode that one the street for a few years. Then went to the 9, no problem handling it. Only problem is all my years of riding dirtbikes has gotten me in the habit of doing wheelies. The 9 is happy to oblige that habit if I do it right. Although I'm sure its going to break something eventually.

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    Very Active Member Stillfree's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Latinrascal View Post
    If you're ridden the big cc dirtbikes with a paddle wheel then you know what the 109 pulls like when you get on the throttle. Bike is well balanced and carries much of its weight on the low side so it's not as top heavy as say compared to the vtx1800. Your not a small guy and should have no problem controlling this bike. I predict if you buy the m90 you will be trading it in by end of riding season for the 109.
    I bought and sold my M90 all within 3 or 4 weeks then bought the my M109R. I have now crossed the line where I will never get my money back for all the mods I have added and all the mods still on my list I want to add. I have no regrets or disappointments with this bike.

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    Default Lots of Solid Advice for New Niner Riders in this Forum

    Started riding at age 52 last year. Never been on a motorbike before. Bought a 2016 M90 and thought she would be around for a few years. Got my 2017 M109R last week.

    If you get the nine straight off, RESPECT the obscene gobs of power it makes! I'd be willing to bet that you've never been on a machine like it before. Spend lots of time in empty parking lots with low speed drills for weight management and throttle/clutch/brake control, or the nine will control you. It's easy to ride at speed (it's built for that) but getting there could be like a rodeo ride that won't end well if you don't practice and, above all, respect the machine's capabilities!

    Wish I had done this sooner! Cheers.

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    As everybody else said respect the bike and it will respect to you I'm 23 just a hair over 200 pounds and 5:10 it's a very comfortable bike for me to ride expecially comparing it to the other street bikes that I've had previously (Kawasaki ninja, and a triumph tt600) I have a 2014 M109R boss Edition with Cobra aftermarket pipes, K&N intake and healtech Xtre power box, it pulls like no other with tbe amount of torque this thing has, biggest thing you have to remember is its an almost 800 pound bike with a wide rear tire so it's not going to lean as easy as a street bike or dirt bike and it's got a he'll of alot more torque than one also
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