OMG trailering the bike, No Straps! Holly! Biker Bar
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  1. #1
    Very Active Member biker-chicky's Avatar
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    Default OMG trailering the bike, No Straps! Holly! Biker Bar

    Does anyone have one of these? Biker Bar

    I know it's a bit pricy, but wow! We have never trailered the bikes before now!

    Hubby's friend is lending us his trailer. We have always ridden the bikes on trips but this time hubby does not want to be wiped out when he has to go back to work. Not a holiday when your exhausted from iron but rides.

    If this idea of trailering the bikes long distances and riding at said locations is pleasing, we will spring for a trailer and possibly a few of these Biker Bars. Looks fast and easy, no straps even for the big Harley's.

    Does anyone have this?

    https://www.etrailer.com/Trailer-Car.../BWMC2301.html


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    Very Active Member TRod's Avatar
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    You couldn't pay me to use that. A few good straps and a wheel chock are maybe $50-75.

    There is a lot of stress put on things the way that works. Straps connected high on the bike have much less stress because of the location and angle.

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    Very Active Member biker-chicky's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TRod View Post
    You couldn't pay me to use that. A few good straps and a wheel chock are maybe $50-75.

    There is a lot of stress put on things the way that works. Straps connected high on the bike have much less stress because of the location and angle.
    Well this bike is no 9 but looks darn secure to me and flipping amazing!




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    Very Active Member thevili's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TRod View Post
    You couldn't pay me to use that. A few good straps and a wheel chock are maybe $50-75.

    There is a lot of stress put on things the way that works. Straps connected high on the bike have much less stress because of the location and angle.
    Come on "T",

    somebody needs to keep the economy going...:-)

    But her hubby can weld a similar contraption made only for their bikes in no time for peanuts if he finds a need for it...

    CHicky,

    The quick on/of is for people who load and unload the bikes daily.. IMHO...
    M109R 2011 Black, 2" lowering bones, air horn, flash to pass garage door opener, Brakeaway Cruise Control, V-stream windshield, Back Off Brake hold, OEM engine guards, Cobra One Piece rear luggage carrier, Cobra Tri Pro 2 in 1 Black exhaust, Cobra FI 2000 AT fuel processor.

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    Very Active Member biker-chicky's Avatar
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    Default OMG trailering the bike, No Straps! Holly! Biker Bar

    Quote Originally Posted by thevili View Post
    Come on "T",

    somebody needs to keep the economy going...:-)

    But her hubby can weld a similar contraption made only for their bikes in no time for peanuts if he finds a need for it...

    CHicky,

    The quick on/of is for people who load and unload the bikes daily.. IMHO...
    I don't know about hubby Wanting to do a welding job, he's sick of fixing chit, that why his bike is bone stock.

    Ya, in the videos looks like it's great for the retired rider, who wants to travel and ride, this is just what we may see in our future. There are just a lot of straight fast roads that I'd rather spend pulling than riding.

    Does anyone get to experience this life style?


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    Very Active Member TRod's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by biker-chicky View Post
    Well this bike is no 9 but looks darn secure to me and flipping amazing!
    That's a stationary bike not going down the road. I don't care if it can hold the bike laying sideways the way it works gives the bike a whole bunch of leverage on the assembly and where it's mounted not only to the bike but to the trailer. When you strap up high, there is a leverage disadvantage for the straps so the load is decreased.

    Going down the road there is constant back and forth and with that cyclical stresses. The way it works a lot of the bikes weight is hanging on the end of a lever that's constantly trying to break the thing and it's mountings.

    A simple $40 chock allows you to ride the bike onto the trailer and into the chock which keeps it upright. You spend 5 minutes putting 2 good quality straps on and you're ready to go.

    Does that contraption stay on when you ride the bike? How much ground clearance do you lose? If it hits the pavement when you ride and screws it up then how will it work?

    Like I said, you couldn't pay me to use it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by TRod View Post
    You couldn't pay me to use that. A few good straps and a wheel chock are maybe $50-75.

    There is a lot of stress put on things the way that works. Straps connected high on the bike have much less stress because of the location and angle.
    I agree totally with TROD on this one.

    BC, don't let yourself get caught up with how amazing something appears to be in a picture. It looks like nothing more than a clever advertising and marketing approach by the manufacturer/distributor. The sure fact that the mounting or securing points are underneath the bike seems like a very bad concept, and an opportunity for someone's bike to be damaged during transport. During the average drive with or without a trailer load, most of us experience some pretty bad roads getting to our destinations. I couldn't imagine that very frail looking device actually sufficiently holding an M109R in place for an extended period of time, on a trailer that's constantly bouncing and shaking during travel. Using good, quality, and proper tie-down straps located in the correct places (the handle bars, top portion of front wheel, and top portion of rear wheel) around the bike is the most secure method of trailering a bike. The item you're looking at seems like a nifty-looking, expensive gadget someone designed without considering the very best locations from which to secure a bike on a trailer. I'm not trying to criticize you about this at all. I would actually hate to hear your bike was damaged, due to improper bracing, and stability during trailer transport. After all, you've been hard at work doing modifications to your 9 this year, and I think you've improved it greatly. Don't risk damaging your 9 with the use of some unproven gadget. It's not worth it.

    Were there any customer reviews available for you to review.

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    Very Active Member thevili's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by biker-chicky View Post
    I don't know about hubby Wanting to do a welding job, he's sick of fixing chit, that why his bike is bone stock.

    Ya, in the videos looks like it's great for the retired rider, who wants to travel and ride, this is just what we may see in our future. There are just a lot of straight fast roads that I'd rather spend pulling than riding.

    Does anyone get to experience this life style?


    I forgot to add that bike will need to be tied/pulled down a little

    so not to allow the suspension to fully extend on

    every bump the trailer hits.. if you know what I mean..
    M109R 2011 Black, 2" lowering bones, air horn, flash to pass garage door opener, Brakeaway Cruise Control, V-stream windshield, Back Off Brake hold, OEM engine guards, Cobra One Piece rear luggage carrier, Cobra Tri Pro 2 in 1 Black exhaust, Cobra FI 2000 AT fuel processor.

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    The few times I had to trailer my bike I had success by using a canyon dancer handlebar tie down adaptor.

    http://www.canyondancer.com/

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    Very Active Member biker-chicky's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mightym90 View Post
    The few times I had to trailer my bike I had success by using a canyon dancer handlebar tie down adaptor.

    http://www.canyondancer.com/
    Nice!


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    Default OMG trailering the bike, No Straps! Holly! Biker Bar

    Quote Originally Posted by JUDAH-9 View Post
    I agree totally with TROD on this one.

    BC, don't let yourself get caught up with how amazing something appears to be in a picture. It looks like nothing more than a clever advertising and marketing approach by the manufacturer/distributor. The sure fact that the mounting or securing points are underneath the bike seems like a very bad concept, and an opportunity for someone's bike to be damaged during transport. During the average drive with or without a trailer load, most of us experience some pretty bad roads getting to our destinations. I couldn't imagine that very frail looking device actually sufficiently holding an M109R in place for an extended period of time, on a trailer that's constantly bouncing and shaking during travel. Using good, quality, and proper tie-down straps located in the correct places (the handle bars, top portion of front wheel, and top portion of rear wheel) around the bike is the most secure method of trailering a bike. The item you're looking at seems like a nifty-looking, expensive gadget someone designed without considering the very best locations from which to secure a bike on a trailer. I'm not trying to criticize you about this at all. I would actually hate to hear your bike was damaged, due to improper bracing, and stability during trailer transport. After all, you've been hard at work doing modifications to your 9 this year, and I think you've improved it greatly. Don't risk damaging your 9 with the use of some unproven gadget. It's not worth it.

    Were there any customer reviews available for you to review.
    Good tips, yes, thanks. Lots of time to investigate, our first experience is almost under way. Yes we're doing the chocks and ties. I just hope it doesn't take all day to load and unload. I just want to flipping ride. Maybe I'll ride and hubby can follow with the trailer rig set up. Maybe I might change his mind about the long haul trailer idea. If we like this idea we'll invest in a trailer/bike set up.

    Everyone Please post your trailering experience and advice, I have read PDFs from uhaul, I know about the trailer wobble and loading the loads equally. Hubby knows quite a bit, but I still need to be able able to load the bikes on my own. I have more days off then he does and if I can trailer the bikes I may save a lot of time as I can drive longer then riding to get to the good spots for ridding!

    Maybe one day I'll make it to the MAM


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    Last edited by biker-chicky; 1 Week Ago at 02:34 PM.

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    Very Active Member Stavros's Avatar
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    Love my triton aluminum trailer..very light yet strong..low,so easy loading without bottoming out,has channels for tie downs,adapts to anything,stonegaurd on front,folding ramp for less wind drag..very easy loading and offloading (one girl job) so light it's easy to move around by hand,u push it out to back of yard for storage..two 9's no problem..so much nicer to trailer to a destination and not worry about weather,to and from..then ride the good areas..plus u can bring so much more gear ,clothes,tools and be ready for anything



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    Quote Originally Posted by biker-chicky View Post
    Good tips, yes, thanks. Lots of time to investigate, our first experience is almost under way. Yes we're doing the chocks and ties. I just hope it doesn't take all day to load and unload. I just want to flipping ride. Maybe I'll ride and hubby can follow with the trailer rig set up. Maybe I might change his mind about the long haul trailer idea. If we like this idea we'll invest in a trailer/bike set up.

    Everyone Please post your trailering experience and advice, I have read PDFs from uhaul, I know about the trailer wobble and loading the loads equally. Hubby knows quite a bit, but I still need to be able able to load the bikes on my own. I have more days off then he does and if I can trailer the bikes I may save a lot of time as I can drive longer then riding to get to the good spots for ridding!

    Maybe one day I'll make it to the MAM


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    Good deal BC. Just take your time, and don't get in a rush about anything. That's usually when unfortunate, unsuspecting, and unnecessary incidents happen. Safety should always be the #1 priority when dealing with a bike in any fashion. Plus, we want the best for you...always!!!

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    Can you rent a U-Haul?

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    Quote Originally Posted by TRod View Post
    You couldn't pay me to use that. A few good straps and a wheel chock are maybe $50-75.

    There is a lot of stress put on things the way that works. Straps connected high on the bike have much less stress because of the location and angle.
    Quote Originally Posted by thevili View Post
    Come on "T",

    somebody needs to keep the economy going...:-)

    But her hubby can weld a similar contraption made only for their bikes in no time for peanuts if he finds a need for it...

    CHicky,

    The quick on/of is for people who load and unload the bikes daily.. IMHO...
    Quote Originally Posted by TRod View Post
    That's a stationary bike not going down the road. I don't care if it can hold the bike laying sideways the way it works gives the bike a whole bunch of leverage on the assembly and where it's mounted not only to the bike but to the trailer. When you strap up high, there is a leverage disadvantage for the straps so the load is decreased.

    Going down the road there is constant back and forth and with that cyclical stresses. The way it works a lot of the bikes weight is hanging on the end of a lever that's constantly trying to break the thing and it's mountings.

    A simple $40 chock allows you to ride the bike onto the trailer and into the chock which keeps it upright. You spend 5 minutes putting 2 good quality straps on and you're ready to go.

    Does that contraption stay on when you ride the bike? How much ground clearance do you lose? If it hits the pavement when you ride and screws it up then how will it work?

    Like I said, you couldn't pay me to use it.
    Quote Originally Posted by thevili View Post
    I forgot to add that bike will need to be tied/pulled down a little

    so not to allow the suspension to fully extend on

    every bump the trailer hits.. if you know what I mean..







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    Very Active Member TRod's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SKIDMARK View Post




    Stuff it butter boy.

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    Quote Originally Posted by TRod View Post
    Stuff it butter boy.

    (Reserved Post for Evillillleil)

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    Very Active Member biker-chicky's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlackhawkFan View Post
    Can you rent a U-Haul?
    No, they don't have the larger ones available with the ramp. And our little truck has its limits as well. We're lucky to have one lent to us. It getting some maintenance, new tires bearings, and some lights, a good clean out and the little dirt bike chocks replaced with the bigger ones I just got. We' ll keep the chocks, and we shall see how I can load and unload the monsters!




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    Very Active Member biker-chicky's Avatar
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    Default OMG trailering the bike, No Straps! Holly! Biker Bar

    Quote Originally Posted by Stavros View Post
    Love my triton aluminum trailer..very light yet strong..low,so easy loading without bottoming out,has channels for tie downs,adapts to anything,stonegaurd on front,folding ramp for less wind drag..very easy loading and offloading (one girl job) so light it's easy to move around by hand,u push it out to back of yard for storage..two 9's no problem..so much nicer to trailer to a destination and not worry about weather,to and from..then ride the good areas..plus u can bring so much more gear ,clothes,tools and be ready for anything



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    Thanks for the info, could you get two 9s on there? I like that it's a light trailer and the tires and rims look good too.


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    Very Active Member Stavros's Avatar
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    Two 9's fit no problem..you have to stagger the chocks about a foot so the bars don't hit each other..plenty of channels in the floor for multiple applications..I tow my diesel tractor with a 6 foot mower deck every now and again..have had 2quads on it..really versatile..with just one 9 on it can't even feel it,forget I'm towing sometimes and get going to quick..gas consumption only goes up if it's loaded with two bikes,with just one its negligble ..

    well made,very light and versatile
    Stav

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    Quote Originally Posted by TRod View Post
    Stuff it butter boy.

    Wheres your sidekick, i saved a space for him even.....


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    Quote Originally Posted by mishap

    Ya, in the videos looks like it's great for the retired rider, who wants to travel and ride, this is just what we may see in our future. There are just a lot of straight fast roads that I'd rather spend pulling than riding.

    Does anyone get to experience this life style?
    We have been travelling by RV for 20 years and towing a motorcycle when we travel. I would recommenend an inclosed trailer for security, cleanliness, and the added benefit of being able to store tools, equipment, and clothing.

    As far as strapping bikes down in the trailer, I always use four straps and on most bikes I attach the straps to the frame. A Condor chock works very well.

    I have pulled a trailer with a motorcycle for 50,000+ miles without a mishap.
    [/url]

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    Very Active Member biker-chicky's Avatar
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    Default OMG trailering the bike, No Straps! Holly! Biker Bar

    Quote Originally Posted by Metalman View Post
    We have been travelling by RV for 20 years and towing a motorcycle when we travel. I would recommenend an inclosed trailer for security, cleanliness, and the added benefit of being able to store tools, equipment, and clothing.

    As far as strapping bikes down in the trailer, I always use four straps and on most bikes I attach the straps to the frame. A Condor chock works very well.

    I have pulled a trailer with a motorcycle for 50,000+ miles without a mishap.
    [/url]
    Oooo, this looks nice, I see you have a double axel for the trailer, does it have brakes as well? Would this set up be good for two bikes? The motor home pulls good then, this is quite a bit of miles, WOW! We'll be using a smaller trailer for two bikes with a single axel. I'd love to see more pictures, and any places you would never park at again.

    I could not find any other brand but these chocks and the tiny tube style for dirt bikes. Thank you so much for sharing.


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    Very Active Member Poseidon's Avatar
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    I have a 7x16 V nose enclosed trailer.

    Name:  IMG_3973.jpg
Views: 131
Size:  94.9 KB


    We use it for hauling the 9, ATV's, and primitive camping. I started adding RV electrical to it last year (still haven't finished it yet) and insulated the walls. I still need to finish the ceiling too. Because of the multiple uses, I wanted to be able to easily keep the floor of the trailer clear, meaning I needed chocks that are easily removable. This is what I went with.

    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1

    To remove them, you just have one thumb screw to remove and all that is left behind are the 2 low profile brackets for each chock. It works great for both the 9 and the Magnum. I just ordered and received a second one so I can haul both bikes at the same time. I plan to bring both bikes to the MAM this year.

    Next, you will want to get some soft straps to wrap around the forks just above the lower triple tree. That gives you a loop to attach the ratchet straps to. There are lots of options for these. Here is a link to some similar to the ones I use. (I bought mine at Romney Cycle back when I bought my 9)

    https://www.amazon.com/200lb-Workloa...or+motorcycles

    Even tho they are pictured looped over the handlebars, I do not recommend using them that way. I've seen handlebars bend, slip in the risers allowing the bars to rotate down, grips slip off, etc. all of which ends with your bike on its side. Just wrap the soft straps around the fork and insert one end thru the loop on the other end of the strap. Here is a picture of the soft straps on my 9. if you look in the bottom right corner of the picture, you can see the hook of the ratchet strap.

    Name:  IMG_1762.jpg
Views: 129
Size:  59.3 KB


    You can see the soft straps a little better on the Magnum.

    Name:  IMG_3667.jpg
Views: 130
Size:  78.1 KB


    Here are the ratchet straps I use. I like them because they are retractable, lock into place really well, yet are quick release. My wife has been able to load and unload the ATV's easily on her own using these straps. When you are done, just push a button and the strap retracts.

    https://www.amazon.com/Erickson-3441.../dp/B005C2ACBI

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    Princess Auto had those on sale recently, ask them and they often honour the sale price for 1 or more months.


    Quote Originally Posted by biker-chicky View Post
    Oooo, this looks nice, I see you have a double axel for the trailer, does it have brakes as well? Would this set up be good for two bikes? The motor home pulls good then, this is quite a bit of miles, WOW! We'll be using a smaller trailer for two bikes with a single axel. I'd love to see more pictures, and any places you would never park at again.

    I could not find any other brand but these chocks and the tiny tube style for dirt bikes. Thank you so much for sharing.


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    Default OMG trailering the bike, No Straps! Holly! Biker Bar

    Quote Originally Posted by BradSmith View Post
    Princess Auto had those on sale recently, ask them and they often honour the sale price for 1 or more months.
    Oh darn, I just got them, I'd have to drive 1.3 hrs to get that money, I'll have to ask next time. Thanks for the heads up. Ya these were 99.99$ lol 100 bucks. Crazy!


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    Very Active Member biker-chicky's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Poseidon View Post
    I have a 7x16 V nose enclosed trailer.

    Name:  IMG_3973.jpg
Views: 131
Size:  94.9 KB


    We use it for hauling the 9, ATV's, and primitive camping. I started adding RV electrical to it last year (still haven't finished it yet) and insulated the walls. I still need to finish the ceiling too. Because of the multiple uses, I wanted to be able to easily keep the floor of the trailer clear, meaning I needed chocks that are easily removable. This is what I went with.

    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1

    To remove them, you just have one thumb screw to remove and all that is left behind are the 2 low profile brackets for each chock. It works great for both the 9 and the Magnum. I just ordered and received a second one so I can haul both bikes at the same time. I plan to bring both bikes to the MAM this year.

    Next, you will want to get some soft straps to wrap around the forks just above the lower triple tree. That gives you a loop to attach the ratchet straps to. There are lots of options for these. Here is a link to some similar to the ones I use. (I bought mine at Romney Cycle back when I bought my 9)

    https://www.amazon.com/200lb-Workloa...or+motorcycles

    Even tho they are pictured looped over the handlebars, I do not recommend using them that way. I've seen handlebars bend, slip in the risers allowing the bars to rotate down, grips slip off, etc. all of which ends with your bike on its side. Just wrap the soft straps around the fork and insert one end thru the loop on the other end of the strap. Here is a picture of the soft straps on my 9. if you look in the bottom right corner of the picture, you can see the hook of the ratchet strap.

    Name:  IMG_1762.jpg
Views: 129
Size:  59.3 KB


    You can see the soft straps a little better on the Magnum.

    Name:  IMG_3667.jpg
Views: 130
Size:  78.1 KB


    Here are the ratchet straps I use. I like them because they are retractable, lock into place really well, yet are quick release. My wife has been able to load and unload the ATV's easily on her own using these straps. When you are done, just push a button and the strap retracts.

    https://www.amazon.com/Erickson-3441.../dp/B005C2ACBI
    Ya those are perfect, thanks


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  30. #28
    Very Active Member Latinrascal's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mightym90 View Post
    The few times I had to trailer my bike I had success by using a canyon dancer handlebar tie down adaptor.

    http://www.canyondancer.com/
    I don't care to tell you how many bikes i have personally witnessed that used those straps that have fallen over damaging itself as well as other bikes on the trailer. I even seen one, a harley fat boy go bouncing off the back of the trailer down I-75 because of those damm canyon dancers on bikes with with bars that mount like ours do. Yes they work great for the crotch rockets (i still wouldn't trust them) but look how their bars (most often 2 individual straight bars, not 1 curved bar) usually mount! With bars such as we have that are attached in the center and then curve outwards allow those straps to either bend the bars ends or rotate them down enough to allow the straps to loosen and bike falls over. Use them if you wish but you have been warned, those things are an accident waiting to happen.

  31. #29
    Very Active Member TRod's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Latinrascal View Post
    I don't care to tell you how many bikes i have personally witnessed that used those straps that have fallen over damaging itself as well as other bikes on the trailer. I even seen one, a harley fat boy go bouncing off the back of the trailer down I-75 because of those damm canyon dancers on bikes with with bars that mount like ours do. Yes they work great for the crotch rockets (i still wouldn't trust them) but look how their bars (most often 2 individual straight bars, not 1 curved bar) usually mount! With bars such as we have that are attached in the center and then curve outwards allow those straps to either bend the bars ends or rotate them down enough to allow the straps to loosen and bike falls over. Use them if you wish but you have been warned, those things are an accident waiting to happen.
    I would never tie to handlebars. Only to the forks or the triple tree.

  32. #30
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    One of the best features of the Condor chock is that it doesn't require binding down the front end of the bike. I apply down and side tension to the middle of the bike and it stays put.

    My dual axel trailer has brakes on both axels. (biker chicky)

    The problem with a single axel trailer (though easier to pull) is possible instability if one of the tires has a blowout. And that is a real possibility. Also, the dual axel trailer will be more stable in cross winds and rough roads. I don't need to use stabilization jacks when loading motorcycles on the trailer, even when it's disconnected from the tow vehicle.

    I have never carried more than one bike at a time, but if I did, I'd try to load one facing the front and one facing the back.

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